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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



TELEPHONE 545 1982 




VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1 



AMHERST. MA 



iai\ 

MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 




SUMMER REGISTRATION 



SPECIAL ISSUE 



INSIDE 




• Trustees vote fee increases: page 3 

• Registration Specials: centerfold, back page 

• Casper* eases course choice: page 14 

• Area job market grim: page 12 






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«. .MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 



TW£ """runccm MIMMER COLLEGIAN 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



.MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 



Comments 



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Letters 



The Massachusetts Summer Collegian welcomes all letters to the editor. They must be signed and 
include the author's address and phone number. Also, all letters must be typed, double-spaced, at sixty 
spaces per line, and no more than two pages. 

Organizations may submit letters, but they must include a name and phone number for reference 
purposes. 

All letters are subject to editing, for either content or space, according to the judge- 
ment of the editors. Due to space limitations, there is no guarantee that all 
letters received will be printed. 

Next week - notes from the State House 

— ^^— pammaaaaamaam — ^ — — — ^ ^— — ^— »— — mamamwawaawaawm ^ ■■■■^■■^■w 

The Summer Collegian will be featuring "What's the Story?" — If you have a question about 
the University, address inquiries to Susan Genser c-o "What's the Story?" in the Collegian office. 



E. Patrick McQuaid 



Taxing the odds 

Meatcleavers tend to mess things up a bit. Especially when it's one man 
who has to do all the aiming. But didn't this Michael Dukakis tell the people 
of Massachusetts before he was elected governor of the Commonwealth, 
what he would do with the State budget? Alas, once again Bay State 
voters thought that at least here was the miracle man, who could sweep 
aside all their plights and woes with a single stroke of the almighty pen. 
Once again disappointment and disillusionment reigns. 

No, this governor did not have a very high opinion of sweeping things 
aside, urilike so many of his predecessors. When he opened his desk 
drawer and saw the bills spill out, he did not slam it shut and forget about it 
for another four years. Indeed he decided to do the impossible and tackle 
the largest deficit any state in the union has ever faced. 

To balance this year's fiscal budget (July 1, 1974- June 31, 1975) he had 
to pressure the foot-dragging legislature into passing $110 million in new 
taxes and borrowing another $450 million by floating state bonds (which 
eventually have to be paid back with over $100 million interest). 

But already the next fiscal year is creeping up on us and the Governor 
has announced that despite a drastic across-the-board 10 per cent cut in 
the budget of the ten executive departments, another whopping $687 
million will have to be squeezed out of Massachusetts taxpayers in one 
way or another, if this State is to avoid total bankruptcy. In one way or 

another. 

But in getting those $687 million together the Governor is truly in a tight 
fix. On the one hand he must consider the growing inability and un- 
willingness of lower and middle income families to slice off a growing 
amount of their already inflation worn wages to finance abstract State 
programs they never seem to get anything out of. 

On the other hand is big business and industry just waiting for a good 
excuse (like the imposition of increased corporation taxes to get out of the 
State and look for more profitable havens elsewhere. And if big business 
leaves, thousands of jobs leave ... 

Mr. Dukakis can still impose new taxes, but only if he managss to 
achieve an atmosphere, where truly everybody feels he or she is being 
treated fairly and where everybody is convinced that all other possible 
options have been exhausted. 

The latter, however, has not been done, due mostly to the Governor's 
neurotic effort to keep a holier-than-thou image. Repeatedly during his 
campaign last year then private citizen Dukakis put off the legalization of 
off-track betting as an unethical way of raising money. 

But according to State Senator George Rogers (D-New Bedford) 
organized crime annually reaps in more than $2 billion in illegal betting and 
gambling money in Massachusetts. Roger noted that this figure, now 7 
years old, could possibly be much higher today. The Senator is convinced 
that if off-track betting were legalized "we could kill two flies with one 
swat." The State, if it put a 10 per cent tax on off-track betting, could raise 
over $200 million in annual revenue and by the same token virtually 
eliminate one of organized crime's most powerful strongholds. So far there 
has been as good as no opposition in the legislature to Roger's bill (Senate 
620), which was introduced in the Senate on Wednesday and is expected 
to come out of committee quickly for consideration by the full Senate. 
There has not yet been any comment from the Governor's office on the 
bill. 

Granted, even if Senate 620 is passed and is signed by the Governor into 
law, new taxes will still be unavoidable. 

Per-the sales tax, which is one of the lowest in the country could be 
raised by 1 per cent, perhaps the State income tax hiked from 5 to 7 per 
cent. 

In any case, if the Governor puts his signature on Senate 620, he can 
truly say that he has tried his best. It would be to his and our advantage. 



Notes From The Undergrad 



Dismissing any similarity to academics, 
that is to say that any resemblance to actual 
scholastics (living or dead) is purely coin- 
cidental, we struck out, camera clad for the 
1975 Commencement ceremonies. This was 
neither the first time nor the last that I should 
be present at the annual rites of passage; 
however, my attendance at the graduate 
post mortum, also knows as the President's 
Lunch, was a knew one on us all. 

Once again the press was "cordially in- 
vited" and once again was welcomed with 
the usual warm sincerity that any student 
might expect from any campus ad- 
ministrator. After a greeting by President 
Robert C. Wood ("Ya gonna roam around, 
take pictures? That's right. Nice to see you 
again.") we made an open bar our focal point 
where came the much talked about decision 
between gin or rum; they had no Irish. This 
was quickly settled by the UMass (our own) 
Department of Safety's top agent, Saul 
Chapin; known in the newspaper business as 
a form rejection. "Just routine," as we 
were courteously shoved behind a coat rack 
and aptly applied the third degreee. After 
providing requested press identification, the 
local grand inquisitor proudly stated that 
"The Collegian is folded up' ". Profound 
protector of freedom; read on, sir. 

Our cordial invitation lead us promptly to 
the rear of the Franklin Dining Commons 
wnere two card tables were intwwii luyeiner 
and shrouded under a while linen tablecloth. 
From this angle we could get some really fine 
close-ups of the kitchen, the fire escape, and 
stored furniture. By the rightful definition of 



the word, we had a real exclusive. 

Sweet smoke of rhetoric! We were soon 
graced by the electric voice of Chancellor 
Randolph ("Bill" as our sources report) 
Bromery. "Just a brief word as the soup's 
getting warm..." he paused for a short round 
of laughter; a bureaucratic chuckle or two. 
Mean while, back in the kitchen with George 
Washington Carver, my companion in 
penmanship retorted, "Oh, it's Gazpacho. I 
thought it was tomato jello. Hhhmm with 
nitrogycerine in the soup 
something's bound to 

blow." Counter to our 
conversation, the 
Chancellor continued, "I 
wanna thank those who 
have attended 
remarkable job 
great day ... blah. .and 
once again, blah..." Mr. 
Bromery was attired in a 
light shaded suit, the 
President was dressed 
entirely in blue, from the 
face down (Dr. Benjamin 
Ricci was the only one wearing an 
off-print tie) and Senate speaker Jon Hite 
wore the school colours, including a red tie 
with some sort of patriotic insignia on it. "I'm 
the only one here wearing a school tie!" he 
stated. We never knew that such an or- 
nament was in existence. 

President Wood took the mike; all rose 

from their untouched Gazpacho. "Would like 

^to tha,n)c...wor\derful ceremony. ..special 




thanks to.. .blah. ..blah... and of course.. .and 
I'll keep it short. We don't want the soup to 
get warm..."; a pregnant pause followed by 
the expected polite titter of response. 
Communication problem? No fault of our's. 
Indeed most of the soup did get warm. 
Surprisingly none of it boiled over. Then 
straight through the second course of 
apetizer, that being the salad, with plenty of 
greenback, student funded lettuce that dried 
to a crisp, and full swing into the "home 
grown" pineapple desert. 
A culinary masterpiece 
molded into some 
variation of fowl; our 
guess being an artificial 
campus pond swan. 
Budget problems? No 
fault of our's. "You won't 
want to take a picture of 

that, will vou? That's right. 
Nice to see you 
again," said the President. 
"And remember to let 
people put their drinks 
down before you shoot 
any of them, won't you? Ah-huh." 
The President's Lunch costs students a 
mere $1,200 and is that part of graduation 
that totally excludes the students except as 
an occasional conversation piece ... and 
speaking of conversation, we can not 
overlook the most recent exercise in 
bureaucracy; that being the Board of 
Trustees' Meeting. This performance was 
given by the same troupe on location at the 



UMass- Boston campus. The coffee was cf 
finer quality but twice as expensive. 

Accomplishments at such assemblages 
are few and far between and any noteworthy 
results are relayed on the news pages of this 
chronicle; however, some serious 
stenography was in order as occassion gave 
rise. 

A brief parley jockeyed between State 
Secretary of Education, Paul Parks and 
UMass-Amherst SGA President, John 
O'Keefe concerning the "Horseback Riding 
Trust Fund" which brought some duration of 
comic relief from the mundane routine. As he 
rolled what was hopefully a cigarette, Mr. 
O'Keefe concluded with "I would suggest 
that the Secretary of Education get together 
with the student leaders." He also made 
clear that any budget votes would have to be 
in the negative as he was representing the 
student body (Yes, that's what we pay him 
to do.) 

All in all, the most profound quote of the 
month, aside from Dr. Wood's "I gather 
we're having the President for lunch", which 
the New Yorker picked up on some time ago, 
must be attributed to Chancellor Randolph 
("Bill" as our sources report) Bromery who 
at the Trustee's meeting made clear his 
position on the budget: "...and those who 
don't qualify for financial aid, then, their 
parents have to pay or they'll have to get a 
second job... or ...something. Finally, it is 
that "or something" that I find disturbing. 



5-member audit team appointed 



Campus Center under investigation 



by Richard Wright 

For anyone who frequents the Campus 
Center this summer it will be obvious that 
many face-lifting operations are underway 
including renovations of the Bluewall and the 
landscaping of the surrounding grounds. 
What may not be noticeable to a casual 
passer-by is the intensive investigation of the 
Campus Center management operations 
called for last month by Chancellor Randolph 
W. Bromery. Wm\ 

auditors appointed 

The investigative team appointed by 
Bromery began its investigation into the 
Campus Center as a result of "a year of 
allegations and rumors" Bromery has grown 
concerned about. The team will conduct a 
management operations audit in all 
departments of the Campus Center and fe 
expected to submit a final report before 
summers end. 

The investigation is the latest phase of a 
continuing series of controversial and 
confusing developments surfacing from the 
Campus Center over the past few years. 
Even as the audit team undertakes to 
determine if there is any substance to 
allegations of mismanagement, the team 
itself has become the subject of controversy. 

A spokesperson from the office of the 
Student Government Association President 
John O'Keefe said yesterday that a 
memorandum had been sent last week to 
Bromery concerning the lack of an un- 
dergraduate student member on the audit 
team. The spokesperson said no response to 
the memorandum has been received. 

The special investigative unit will be 
headed up by Kenneth Dean, who has been 
acting director of the Residential Life office 



and who was an acting director of the 
Campus Center for a period of 1973 prior to 
the hiring of the present director John 
Corker. ^ j HJ 

Other members of the select ,WWi include 
Robert Planner, Associate Professor of 
General Business and Finance; Albert 
Wrisley, Associate Professor in Hotel, 
Restaurant and Travel Administration; 
Gordon Gillet, graduate student in ac- 
counting and Michael Gregory, graduate 
student in business administration. ^*g 

Dean said the team wilt interview the 
department heads at the Campus Center, the 
student Board of Governors, and John 
Corker the present director of the complex. 

"We will get a very quick overview of the 
functions performed by the Campus Cen- 
ter," Dean said. Following this interview 
process a detailed plan for conducting the 
Study will be assembled according to Dean. 

previous investigation 

The appointing of this special investigative 
team comes exactly two years to the month 
after a report was released by a private 
consulting firm that reviewed the Campus 
Center to determine why it was a money- 
losing operation. 

That study was commissioned by the 
Board of Governors and revealed there was 
no reason the building should be losing 
money if certain changes could be made. 
According to a spokesperson for the Board 
of Governors many of the recommendations 
of the consulting firm were not implemented 
due to the feeling of the Board, at that time, 
that many students would not support the 
necessary commercialization required to 
become profit generating. Additionally, 
unusual constraints encountered in an 
operation of the type the Campus Center 



represents would make implementation of 
some of the recommendations impossible. 

The spokesperson said however, the firm 
of Arthur D. Little Inc. which conducted the 
study two years ago said the Campus Center 
should seek to operate as a break-even 
operatiorttv^ J^rtj 

"If it hadn't been for one department we 

'would have broken even (i his year)," said the 

spokesperson. "On the whole the building is 

doing quite well", the spokesperson added. 

The report of A.D. Little said the Campus 
Center should be able to "generate sufficient 
revenues to cover maintenance and 
overhead". According to newspaper reports 
at the time of the study, student observers 
felt the future of the Campus Center hinged 
on who replaced top management personnel 
who had resigned in early 1973 alledgedly 
due to political infighting among the 
management, the administration, and the 
Joard of Governors. 

Among the top three managers of the 
Campus Center, one has recently resigned 
and another has been asked to resign by the 
Board of Governors. Philip Amico, Food 
Services Manager has been charged with 
misfeasance by the Board and has been 
asked to resign. Oliva Stephano, Purchasing 
and Production Manager submitted his 
resignation officially for reasons of ill health. 



Stefano not billed 



The Board of Governors became con- 
cerned when it learned that Stephano was 
not billed for eight months by Amico for a 
wedding reception for Stephano's daughter 
last August. The bill for $2,452 was finally 
sent in March and as recently as last month 
had not been paid in full. 



Corker said "I feel his (Stephano) intent 
was never to pay the bill. But his judgement 
was extremely poor. We felt mutually that he 
should resign." 

Allegations that the cost of the Stephano 
reception may have been substantially higher 
than the bill sent will be among the items to 
be investigated by the audit team. 

The Board voted unanimously this week to 
ask Amico to resign which reconfirmed the 
unanimous vote of May 15. At that time 
Board Chairperson Jeffrey Taggert said one 
of the reasons for the decision to ask for 
Amico's resignation was his failure to bill 
Stephano for the wedding reception. 

Another complaint involved the disclosure 
that Amico had been allowed to live in the 
Campus Center hotel free of charge for eight 
months. Corker explained that because 
Amico lives in Connecticut and works 10 to 
12 hour days seven days a week he permitted 
Amico to live in the hotel. 

Other items to be looked at by the team 
will include the cash payments paid to some 
bands performing at the Campus Center, 
rumors of prostitues working in the building 
during conventions, and pricing practices. 




Collegian News 

Desk phone 

$45-1982 



Board of Trustees vote 



Mandatory Fee$ Increase 



by Dan LaBonte 

Most UMass-Amherst students 
will find at least mandatorv fee 
increases when they receive their 
fall 1975 semester bills this summer. 
The two significant room and board 
increases — $39.50 per year for a 
ten-meal dining hall plan and $30.00 
per year for residence halls — are a 
result of action taken by the board 
of trustees concerning fee changes 
contained within the FY 1976 Fee- 
Based Budget for the Amherst 
campus. 

The trustees, at their regular 
June meeting, voted over- 
whelmingly that effective in the fall 
semester 1975, for one year, all full- 
time undergraduate students be 
required to subscribe to a boarding 
plan in the campus dining com- 
mons — at a 6.4 percent increase 
— and live in on-campus residence 
halls — at an average 4.7 percent 
increase — during their freshman, 
sophomore, and junior years. 

The age exemption which has 
previously allowed 21 -year olds 
impunity from the room and board 
requirements is no longer effective. 
Only married students, veterans, 
students living in and commuting 
from their parent'(s) or guardian's 
home, and resident members of 
fraternities or sorrorities are exempt 
from the requirements. 

The two student trustees, John 
O'Keefe and Cary Rothenburger, 
cast the only votes against the 
mandatory fee increases. State 
Education Secretary Paul Parks, 
sitting in for Gov. Michael S. 
Dukakis on the board was the only 
abstention. 

Parks was unsure as to the affect 
the fee increase would have on the 
amount students have to pay to 
attend UMass, and he said it wasn't 
:lear where all the fee revenue was 
:>eing spent 



According to Acting Director of 
the Office of Residential Life (ORL) 
W. Daniel Fitzpatrick, the increases, 
which raise the rent for 
unrenovated dorms from $615 to 
$654 and from $675 to $705 for 
renovated droms, will help UMass 
meet it's fiscal responsibilities. 

"The largest hurdle we (UMass) 
have to overcome at the moment is 
in meeting the Commonwealth's 
obligation to bond holders," Fitz- 
patrick said in a recent interview. 



Both Warren and Fitzpatrick, in 
separate interviews, said the 
ultimate goal of the university is to 
provide total voluntary dormitory 
and dining common services, 
however in order to meet financial 
responsibilities, mandatory dorm 
and dining halls were the only 
immediate solution. 

According to the Fee-Based 
Budget, ORL has, in the past, 
"been involved in the exploration of 
alternatives to mandatory oc- 



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Secretary of Education Paul Parks, Chancellor Randolph W. 
Bromery, and trustee finance committee chairman Robert Gordon 
at the June 4 Board of Trustees meeting. 



FRISBEES 



The increase in fees and ex- 
pected occupancy increase will 
generate approximately $370,000 in 
additonal revenue. About sixty 
perceni of the revenue will cover 
increases in utility costs, according 
to the Fee-Based Budget (Doc. 
T75-121). 

Arthur H. Warren, Acting 
Director of the Food Services, said 
the major portion of the mandatory 
dining hall fee increase "will 
hopefully cover the increased food 
and labor costs" for next year. 



cupancy and the near total reliance 
on two semester's room rents from 
students to meet a year's 
operational costs." 

"To my knowledge, at this point 
in time, there are no steps being 
taken in regards to the exploration 
of alternatives to present policies of 
mandatory dorm occupancy," 
Fitzpatrick said. The hope is, 
however, that "by September, a 
committee will be organized to 

continued on pg. 15 



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THE MASSACHUab.lTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



— MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 



THE M — " CCTT * *"*AMER COLLEGIAN 



MONDAY. JUNE 23. 1975 - 



PtOW 






The state flag flew upside down as some sixty per cent of thei 
5,000 degree candidates gathered beneath a bleak, rain threatening 
sky to hear a succession of speakers warn them of an equally 
depressing and uncertain economic dilemma facing them upon the 
conferral of their graduate degrees. 

beneath a bleak, rain threatening sky to hear a succession of 
speakers warn them of an equally depressing and uncertain 
economic dilemma facing them upon the conferral of their graduate 
degrees. 

Rev. Leo A. LeClerc prayed during his invocation, that the Lord 
help the graduates "find a place in the sun, but first, help them find a 
position." 

That may indeed require some kind of divine intervention, for, as 
Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery pointed out in his opening 
remarks, "The world, this nation and in particular this state is ex- 
periencing the worst economic crisis since the Depression of the 
30 s ..beset by deep social malaise, increasing disharmony between 
races and sexes and a pervasive disenchantment and 
discouragement with its institutions." 

Senior William H. Foster, in his commencement address, aptly 
noted that "A university is a very specialized environoment and only 
vaguely resembles reality." A reality which principle speaker Dr. 
Marina von Neumann Whitman, former member of President 
Richard M. Nixon's Council of Economic Advisers, said is in need of 
"firm, unambivalent economic policies." 

PhofiS by Debbie Schafer and E. Patrick McQuaid. Text by Dan 
LaBonte. 



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by Cliff Skibinsky 

UMass Amherst and UMass Boston are the two 
leading contenders for the site of the long delayed 
John F. Kennedy Memorial Library, according to 
Library Director Daniel Fenn. There is also a possibility 
that the library will be built at two separate locations 
offered by Harvard. 

The decision will come this week when the Library 
Corporation Board of Directors, which includes 
Edward Kennedy and Arthur Slesinger Jr., among 
other associates of the late president, meets to decide 
on a site. 

Fenn says that there is some preference among the 
directors for the UMass Boston site, mainly because 
President Kennedy wanted the library to be built in an 
urban area. However, Fenn did state that Amherst 
had a number of advantages, among them, the lower 
cost of construction due to the fact that no demolition 
of existing buildings would be necessary in Amherst 
as it would in Boston. This fact would also allow the 
Library to be completed sooner; an "important 
consideration" said Fenn. 

Gerald J. Grady, cochairperson of Citizens for the 
JFK Library, an Amherst group, listed other factors 
which he felt should be considered in choosing a site. 
Grady, a former political science professor, stated that 
Kennedy was a "national or worldwide person" as 
opposed to a person who was primarily connected 
with Boston or Harvard. Thus, he feels, the library 
should be built outside of Boston to emphasize this. 
Grady suggests that a visit to a library located in 
Amherst with its unhurried atmosphere may be more 
meaningful than a visit to a library in Boston's urban 
setting with its plethora of libraries and museums. In 
addition, he said, Amherst has many of the ad- 
vantages of an urban area as it is situated ap- 
proximately equidistant from the eastcoast's two 
major urban centers. 

A JFK Library in Amherst would bring the town 
and the university many advantages, Grady said. 
Primary of these, he feels, is the honor and prestige 
the library would bring UMass Amherst. It would, he 

said. put the university in "the big leagues." Grady is 
excited by the educational benefits the HDrary wouiu 
bring Amherst. He cited the "innovative ideas" it 
would bring. 



The library would bring to Amherst, according to 
Director Fenn, an archives with an estimated 45 
million documents, including films, oral history in- 
terviews, and books and papers. It would also bring a 
museum with 13 thousand objects from the Kennedy 
era. The library would work closely with all 
educational institutions in the area. It would offer 
films, free lectures, presentations to public school, 
and traveling exhibits of documents and photos. At its 
present cramped location in a Federal records building 
in Waltham, the library has sponsored talks by figures 
such as Tom Wicker of the N.Y. Times, and Sander 
Vanocur of NBC. 

The library would also bring some 300,000 visitors a 
year; 2700 persons in 810 cars on a peak day, ac- 
cording to a JFK Library consulting firm. The firm 
says that the total impact on area traffic will be very 
slight. Most of the visits to the library will be 
generated by students and faculty of surrounding 
institutions and would not add to the traffic level. The 
firm also claims that the economic impact of the 
library could be absorbed by existing facilities, i.e., 
shops, restaurants, etc. 

Grady claims that most of the visitation would 
occur in the summer when the traffic level is low. He 
says that this would help balance out local business 
over the year. In addition, local construction in- 
dustries, where unemployment is about 25 percent, 
may benefit from an Amherst site, Grady said. As the 
building of the library is a federal project, bidding is 
open to all, giving local companies a chance to im- 
prove business. All things considered, says Grady, the 
postitive impact of the library would be so great as to 
make negative effects negligable. 

UMass' involvement with the Kennedy Library 
began early in February after the library corporation 
dropped its original plan to build the library in 
Cambridge due to community opposition to increased 
traffic. Since then Harvard Colleae has offered 
separate sites for the museum and a- es. However, 
Stephen E. Smith, head of the libr. , corporation in 
Boston, has said that the corporation does not have 
the money to build the library at two separate sites. 
Thus, a Harvard location appears unlikely. After the 
original Harvard site was dropped, UMass president 
Robert Wood offered sites at both UMass Amherst 

continued on pg. 15 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



« ■ • - .v\ 

MONDAY, JUNE 23, 19. 5 



MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Bits and Pieces 



Bits and Pieces 



Students Unite! 



The Union of Student Employees 
(U.S.E.) will take another step 
forward on Monday, June 23rd, 
with a formal hearing before the 
Massachusetts Labor Relations 
Board. The hearing will be con- 
cerned with U.S.E.'s case for legal 
recognition by management. The 
union had filed a petition seeking 
certification by the commission on 
April 8th. At that time, the union 
submitted authorization cards 
signed by a substantial majority of 
the Campus Center's student and 
hourly workforce. The issues in- 
volved in the hearing include 
whether student employees are 
eligible for inclusion under Public 
Employees collective bargaining 
laws, as well as the criteria for 
determining the appropriate 
bargaining unit. 

On June 13th, U.S.E. attended a 
pre-hearing conference on an unfair 
labor practice charge which had 
been filed by the union. The charge 
dealt with an evaluation form which 
had been instituted at the end of 
last semester by the C.C. Food 
Services Department. The union 
found the form, and particularly 
two of the questions offensive and 
discriminatory against union 
organizers and members. The 
questions are as follows: LOYALTY 

Has a definite concern for the 
company and-or management and 
strives to project a good image? 

Is disloyal to management, 
agitates employees? 

Is disloyal to management, 
projects a bad image to customers? 

Is neutral in his-her loyalty to 
management and RELATIONS 
WITH SUPERVISERS? 

Very pleasant and cooperative, 
willing to help? 

Very uncooperative, resents 
taking orders? 

Constant grumbler and corn- 
plainer? 



Maintains good relation.' with 
supervisors? 

In light of the fact that over 65 
per cent of the workforce in the 
Campus Center signed union 
membership cards last semester, 
the union felt that being "disloyal 
to management," "agitating 
employees," or being a "grumbler" 
as a criterion for further em- 
ployment would be discriminatory 
against union membership, and 
was an attempt by management to 
interfere with the Campus Center 
worker's right to organize. 

At the conference Friday, the 
University's representative in light 
of what he termed a "complex and 
emotional" argument, offered to 
withdraw the two questions the 



union objected to from the 
evaluation form, in order to "get on 
with the important questions" 
which will be decided next week. 

Chrissi Emerson, membership co- 
ordinator for the Union of Student 
Employees said that the union is 
encouraging all available student 
and hourly employees to attend the 
hearing next Monday. Car pools 
can be arranged for those who 
would like to attend from the 
Amherst area. For more in- 
formation she can be reached 
evenings at 586-3478. 

The other work that the union 
has been involved in so far this 
summer has been a program 
providing job information to those 
incoming students. 



Stay Healthy 



University Health Services will 
offer prepaid health services to 
students during the summer. 
Services available will be the same 
package provided during the 
regular school year, including: 
physician, nurse practitioner, 
mental health consultations, 24- 
hour urgent care, medications, 
diagnostic services, impatient care, 
consultation with orthopedic and 
gynecological specialists and health 
education programs and con- 
sultation. 

Two programs initiated this past 



year also are included: the Dental 
Program provides emergency care, 
initial oral examination, and oral 
health education sessions, with 
additional services available on a 
co-payment or fee-for-service 
basis. The Eye Care Program 
provides screening and emergency 
care. Optometric examination is 
available on a co-payment basis. 
None of these services are provided 
by the student supplementary 
insurance plan except in cases of 
accidental injury: 

The prepaid package of services 
covers the period from June * 1 
through August 31 for a $35 fee. 
Students who are enrolled in the 
summer session pay a health care 
fee as part of their service fees. 



Price Slasher 



The Message Company of 
Amherst announced plans recently 
to present the 1975 Discount Guide 
to Dining and Entertainment in the 
Pioneer Valley. Publication date is 
slated for September 1. 

Over 30,000 copies of the coupon 
booklet will be distributed 



throughout the five-college area, 
reported Jerald H. Lazar, president 
of the Message Company. 

The Message Company is an 
editorial consulting and creative 
design service which has produced 
such publications as UMass 
Rowing News and NU, The Five 
College Jewish Monthly. 

All local businesses which 
students patronize — including 
restaurants, clothing stores, stereo 
shops, florists, theaters, etc. — 



I 



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Tennis Shoes : 

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00 



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features: 

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• spacious — two cubic-foot capacity 
•versatile — has two ice cube trays and freezer 
compartment 

handsome-decorator walnut finish doubles as 
end table 



You can keep a complete supply of snacks and refresh- 
ments — including milk, fresh fruits and other perishables 
— right in your dormitory room with a refrigerator. And 
the convenience of a Campus Rentals unit can be yours for 
just pennies a day. 

Added Features: 

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limited quanity available 

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KARATE 

KARATE IS FOR YOU 

Learn Karate This Summer 
Protect Yourself 

—A modern, scientific approach to the basic principles 
and practice of Karate 



—This is the least expensive program to be Jound 
anywhere that teaches the true art and discipline 
in Karate 



Summer classes will be scheduled to your 
convenience 



—For further information, call the UMass 
Karate Club at — 

586-3924 

(EVENINGS) 



have been invited to submit 
discount coupons for the 
DISCOUNT GUIDE. Lazar 
predicted the total purchasing value 
of the pocket-sized booklet to be 
"in the hundreds of dollars." 

The DISCOUNT GUIDE, Lazar 
added, "will be a service to both the 
students and the merchants. Over 
7,000 copies of the DISCOUNT 
GUIDE will be in the hands of new 
and transfer students who will need 
an introduction to the many ser- 
vices this busy area provides." 

If the DISCOUNT GUIDE is 
successful, Lazar indicated, it may 
be published on a semi-annual 
basis. 

TAOC Union? 



The Teacher's Assistants 
Organizing Committee (TAOC) is a 
group of University graduate 
students who are investigating the 
possibility of forming a T.A. Unfon 
(including R.A.'s and S.A.'s as 
well). With most other employees 
on campus either unionized or in 
the process of organizing, and with 
Dukakis' proposed cutbacks, T.A.'s 
have recognized the importance of 
forming an organization to protect 
their rights. Formed in May, the 
TAOC was initially funded by the 
Graduate Student Senate and is 
working this summer with three 
salaried graduate student 
organizers and an actiwe work- 
group. Basic tasks for this summers 
organizing include population and 
legal research, making contacts 



with T.A. unions at other univer- 
sities, and compiling a newsletter 
on unionization efforts. 

The T.A. Organizing Committee 
meets every Thursday afternoon at 
3:00 p.m. in the Campus Center 
(room number posted by elevator 
on concourse level of Campus 
Center.) All graduate students (with 
or without Assistantships) are 
encouraged to come and exchange 
views and information concerning 
the unionization movement. The 
TAOC hopes to involve as many 
graduate students as possible in 
order to insure the growth of a 
democratic union which is truly 
responsive to the needs of all 
graduate students at the University. 
In addition to making people 
familiar with the political and 
economic issues surrounding 
unionization, the TAOC needs 
graduate students interested in 
helping with research. 

Anyone interested in further 
information about the TAOC, or 
T.A. unionization in general, is 
invited to attend the regular 
Thursday meetings and-or stop by 
the TAOC's office, room 426 on the 
second floor of the Student Union 
Building. 



65ers 



get 
freebies 



[ FUNKY ] 

\ CL OTHES! 






PANTS: 
$1" to $5 

SHIRTS: 
$3 to $7 

..Always a good buy! 



4 



VASIL. 

AMHERST CARRIAGE SHOPS 



People 65 years of age or older 
no longer have to pay tuition to 
enroll on a space available basis in 
credit-free workshops offered by 
the Division of Continuing 
Education at UMass. 

Throughout the year Continuing 
Education offers many workshops 
designed to meet the educational, 
career and leisure time needs of 
adult learners. 

This summer over 25 workshops 
in alternative energy and food 
production are offered in the 
program, "Toward Tomorrow: A 
Symposium of Alternatives." 
Topics include organic farming and 
gardening, electric cars, windpower 
and solar energy. 

Instructors emphasize the "how- 
to" of the subject matter. 
Whenever possible students are 
involved in building, measuring, 
growing and problem solving. 
Workshops meet on weekend or 
week-long schedules from June 27 
through Aug. 15. 




Serving Beer & Wine 

Monday and Tuesday 

Special: 

Large 

Pitcher of Beer 

and Large 

Tomato & Cheese Pizza 

$025 



Gay Alliance 



The People's Gay Alliance and 
the Gay Women's Caucus extend a 
welcome to summer students and 
non-student newcomers to the 
Amherst area. The People's Gay 
Alliance and Gay Women's Caucus 
are recognized student 

organizations formed to provide an 
atmosphere of support, friendship, 
and personal growth for the Gay 
community. 

On a regional-national level we 
join in working with other Gay 
organizations in efforts to end 
discrimination. We are also 
committed to work toward the 
elimination of prejudicial practices 
on campus and the establishment 
of supportive facilities for the Gay 
community. 

Recently, we have intensified our 
efforts in working with third world 
and feminist communities, in the 
realization that the same in- 
stitutions which oppress these 
people also oppress us, and that 
united action is essential in ending 
prejudice and discrimination 
against all. 

We realize that the repressive 
atmosphere created by church, 
state, family, etc. makes many Gay 
people hesitant to participate in the 
Gay community or to even seek the 
counselling and supportive help 
need to deal with their feelings. To 
this end, Gay Line was established 
and will operate during the summer 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8 
p.m. to 11 p.m. 

We have male and female co- 
counsellors to rap about your 
feelings, answer any questions you 
might tvi\ We are not a 
professional staff. Our counselling 
is based on our own experiences. 
We know that many of you will be 
apprehensive of the consequences, 
perhaps a bit frightened and will 
want utter discretion. We respect 
these feelings and wishes because 
many of us have had similar 
anxieties when we first contacted 
P.G.A.-G.W.C. 

If you need further help, we have 
a referral list of professional 
counsellors, health 
services, Gay 

denominations etc. 
Gay Line, 545-0154. 
mean being alone! 

Over the summer, People's Gay 
Alliance and Gay Women's Caucus 
will sponsor social function and 
participate in political activities. 
Dances will be held each month at 
Farley Lodge on campus. The first 
disco dance is slated for Friday, 
June 27, from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. 
Refreshments will be served; cover 
is 75 cents. 

A picnic and barbecue is in the 
planning for August. The People's 
Gay Alliance and Gay Women's 
Caucus will lend their political 
support as the need arises. Further 
details on these events will be 
posted throughout campus, in the 
Collegian, and announced on 
Gaybreak Radio at 10 p.m. WMUA 
91.1 FM on the first and third 
Wednesday of every month. 

The People's Gay Alliance and 

Gay Women's Caucus also extend 

an invitation to all interested 

* persons to stop by our office on the 

Student Union balcony, Rm 413. 



Only 
Open 
Seven Days 



3' 



11 a.m. 'til 1 a.m. 



SUBS & PIZZA 

55 



UNIVERSITY Dr 
Amherst Mass. 
TEL. J5b 8914 



clinics, legal 

religious 

So call us on 

Gay does not 



Kundalini Yoga 



Kundalini Yoga classes will be 
held Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings from 5:30-7:00 in the 
Campus Center. Check daily 
schedule for room number. 

The classes will be sponsored by 
the Kundalini Yoga Club, and will 
include the following: chanting, 
mediation, mantras, breath 
technique, and massage. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



— MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975_ 



. MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Whafs 




On 



• Bicentennial Lecture Series • 



Music 'n Dance 




The American Bicentennial from Different Cultural I 
Perspectives is the theme of this year's Summer j 
Activities lecture series. 

Everett Emerson, president of the Amherst 
Historical Society, will begin the series on June 24 
with "Literature of the Pioneer Valley in the 
Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century." 

Emerson will focus on the history of the Valley, its 
people, patterns of settlement and writings that have 
dealt specifically with the area. 

A professor of English at UMass, Emerson has 
written and edited several books on American history 
including the forthcoming Letters from New England: 
The First Decade of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 

1629- 1638. 

The second lecture in the series, "How do We 
Discover Who Discovered America; An Asian- 
American Perspective on the Heritage of America," 
will be presented by Bob Suzuki on July 1. 

Suzuki will explore American history from the 
viewpoint of minority groups, an approach he feei;' 
can yield a better perspective on the nation's heritage. 

Active for many years in Asian American studies 
and problems, Suzuki is currently a professor in the 
School of Education at UMass. His specialties are 
multicultural education and Asian American studies. 

All Bicentennial lectures will be presented at 2:00 
p.m. in the Student Union Colonial Lounge at UMass. 




Tuna Stewart 

Everett Emerson 



The Detroit Four 

The Detroit Four, featuring drums, piano, 
trombone and bass, will present the first 
Music and Dance Review of the Summer 
Concert series. The concert will begin at 8:00 
p.m. on Thursday, June 26. 

The band will play music of the 40's and 
50's, what was commonly known as 
"bebop." 

The bebop period was marked by in 
novative musicians like Max Roach, Dizzy 
Gillespie, Charlie Parker, J.J. Johnson and 
Tad Dameron. 

Dameron wrote for the first Dizzy Gillespie 
band in the 40's and was among the first to 
add bop's harmonic and rhythmic patterns to 
the big band sound. 

J.J. Johnson was considered the greatest 
trombonist of his generation. Drummer Max 
Roach contributed greatly to the field of 
percussion instruments and modern choral 
background during the period. 

The Detroit Four will also play Charlie 
Parker selections. Parker made his name in 
bebop with a straight ahead playing style. 
Appearing with The Detroit Four will be 
"The Mad Gibsons." The concert will begin 
at 8:00 p.m. on Metawampe Lawn, behind 
the Student Union. The rain location is the 
Student Union Ballroom. 
Bring a blanket for seating. 



The Mad Gibsons 

At five years old, Albert Gibson broke into 
show business in "Hell's A Poppin" a 1920's 
dance review. 

In the 1930' s, Sandra Gibson was known 
at the "Queen of Boogie Woogie." 

On Thursday, June 26 the husband-wife 
team will appear here as "The Mad Gibsons" 
in a music and dance review celebrating the 
40's and 50's. 

For over 50 years Albert Gibson has been 
on the stage in a variety of dancing, singing 
and comedy acts. He is credited with 
originating dances like "Scraunce" and 
"Hicky Ricky" and "Pull-it." 

During her career, Sandra Gibson has 
appeared as an exotic dancer, a comedienne, 
a singer and in films. She is known as a show 
business jack-of-all-trades and has per- 
formed at the old Apollo theater, the Cotton 
Club, Radio City and The Roxy. 

The Gibsons will appear with The Detroit 
Four in the first Summer Activities concert, 
June 26 at 8:00 p.m. The concert will be on 
Metawampe Lawn behind the Student 
Union. In case of rain it will move indoors to 
the Student Union Ballroom. 

Bring a blanket for seating. 




Student Union 

Art Gallery 



The Mad Gibsons will appear in a 
Detroit Four on Thursday. June 26. Music and dancing from the 40 s 
and 50's will be featured. 



The Student Union Art Gallery will be offering a very extensive 
summer program this year, as a result of "a tremendous amount of en- 
thusiasm and interest for the gallery's programs in the past," according to 
gallery director Joe Kos. 

The gallery will continue to run as it has in the past, using the space 
primarily as an experimental workshop for students to show their works, 

Kos said. 

Howard McCalebb, artist- lecturer from the UMass Art Department, 
will highlight the gallery's premier exhibition which will run from June 24 
through July 1. McCalebb's show, entitled "Poem", will include some of 

his latest work. 

The gallery plans to exhibit a series of shows by area artists, and there 
is a good possibility of extending the shows to other schools outside the 5- 
College area on an exchange basis, according to Kos. 

"There will be quite a few interested art people staying in the 5- 
College area this summer who want a place to show their work and to see 
what others are doing and I can't think of a better place for all of this to 
happen than right here at the Student Union Gallery," Kos said. 

"Stories" a group show by area artists, is the gall' Vs second 

scheduled exhibit and will run through July 8. Other shows include an 

opportunity for area photographers to display their work during a Photo 

-.Show which will run through July 15. Don Milliken is scheduled to round 

out the gallery's timetable with an exhibit entitled Object (ionables) that 

will show August 3 through 9. 

There will also be numerous additional unscheduled shows during the 
course of the summer "to fill in the gaps" between scheduled events, 
according to Joe Ng, a gallery staff member. 

To present as interesting, active, and diverse program as possible, Kos 
sa id he'll "be looking forward to the continued support from area students, 
music and dance review with the artists, and interested people as has been shown on the past." 



by, for, and about women 



Project Self Workshops 



Project Serf is a series of 
workshops by. for and about 
women, sponsored by 

Everywoman's Center at UMass. 
This summer 30 eight week 
workshops and three Days and 
Weekends are being offered to area 
women. 

Project Self and Days and 
Weekend workshops are designed 
to serve as alternative educational 
experiences for those who are 
recently returned to school, who 
are considering it, and for women 
who simply want to explore some 
skills and experiences with other 
women. The workshop atmosphere 
is supportive and friendly, and the 
structure is loose. 

The workshops to be offered this 
summer include a wide spectrum 
on exploring skills for living, cultural 
identity for women, and personal 
and political identity. Some of the 
workshops which explore skills for 
living are: Bicycle Repairs, 
Demystifying Our Cars, and Car- 
pentry. 



Other workshops are oriented 
towards exploring our identities. A 
few of these are: Women's Scripts: 
How Families And Society Affect 
Life Roles For Women, Hatha 
Yoga, Self- Help: The Politics of 
Women's Health Care, Speak Up: 
A Self-help Workshop on Asser- 
tiveness and Sketchings: Informal 
Writing for Increased Awareness. 
There will be a number of 
workshops which deal with women 
and their creativity. These cover 
areas such as Women's Future 
Through Science Fiction, Reading 
Poetry, Creative Dance, and the 
Role of Women In Dance. 

In addition to the series of eight 
week workshops, Everywoman's 
Center is offering two weekend 
workshops and one day workshop. 
These are: Life Planning and 
Creati"e Outdoor Living Weekends, 
and Body Work and Movement 
Day. The cost of these specific 
workshops vary and they are 
scheduled throughout the summer. 
All eight week workshops are 



twenty-five dollars and a limited 
number of scholarships are 
available. Workshops begin the 
week of June 23rd and end the 
week of August 11th. 

The registration period for 
Project Self workshops is being 
extended through the week of June 
23 this year, since some of the 
workshops still have openings 
available. Everywoman's Center 
advises those who are interested in 
a particular workshop to call the 
center at 545-0883 and see if 
enrollment is still open. 

Everywoman's Center will be 
switching to new summer hours on 
June 23rd. The Center will be open 
Monday through Thursday from 1 1 
a.m. to 4 p.m. for the duration of 
the summer. Please feel free to call 
or come in at these times. 

EWC will be open for official 
University business only on Fridays. 
In these cases call 545-0913. 

EWC is located in 506 Goodell 
Hall. 



- Loca I 



MUSIC 



Concerts 



s 



Chubby Checker - Mt. View Frolics (Chicopee), June 28 
James Montgomery Band - Crystal Park (Palmer), June 20, 21 
Mitch Chakcur & The Mission Band - Rusty Nail (Sunderland), 

June 20-22 

Fat - 5th Alarm (Springfield), June 26-28 

Deadly Nightshade - Shea's Grove (Chicopee), June 28 

Jim K Band - Red Pantry (Belchertown), June 20, 21 

Some Of My Best Friends - Steak Out, June 20, 21 

Radio King a His Court of Rhythm - 5th Alarm, June 22, 23 

Big Screamin' McGrew - Shea's Grove, June 27 

Hamilton Bates Blue Flames - Lazy River (Northampton), June 20-22 

Little Fire - Vin's Gym (Springfield), June 20, 21 

Jacob's Reunion - Chelsea House Cafe and Folklore Center (W. 
Brattleboro, Vt.), June 27, 28 

Jack Veronesi with Tom McNamera - Lazy River, June 24, Zb 

Seagull - Red Pantry, June 26-28 

Cricket Hill - 5th Alarm, June 20, 21 

Forest - Lakeview Inn (Southwick), June 24 

Doctors - Highland (Springfield), June 20, 21 

Little Fire - Steak Out, June 25-28 

Nick Seeger - Chelsea House Cafe and Folklore Center, June 20, /' 

No Left Turn — Rusty Nail, June 24 

Hand Picked with Bruce MacKay - Red Pantry, June 29 

Moonlight Flyers — Lazy River, June 26-29 

Firewater - Shea's Grove, June 20, 21 

Albatross - 4 Leaf Window (New Salem), June 20-22 

Potter Mountain Road Band - Lakeview Inn, June 20-22 

Full Moon - Quicksilver, June 20, 21 

' ' iy Bear - Red Pantry, June 24, 25 

-,7 Dantas Band - The Pub, June 20, 21 
Tupelo — Red Pantry, June 22 



(Tickets available at Tickteron in CC Hotel Lobby) 
UMASS 

Paul Winter Consort — July 10, Metawampe Lawn (12 & 8 PM) 
fr ee SPRINGFIELD 

Eric Clapton-Santana — June 24, Civic Center 
Elvis Presley - July 14 & 15. Civic Center (sold out) 
Ali vs. Bugner, other fights, closed circuit TV - June 30, 
Exhibition Hall, Civic Center 
Professional Wrestling - July 5, Exhibition Hall, Civic Center 
U.S. Accordian Championship & Festival - July 9-11, Civic 
Center 

The Osmonds - Aug. 7, Civic Center 

Miss World U.S.A. Pageant (with Bob Hope) - Aug. 17, Civic 

Center LENOX, Mass. (Music Inn) 

Doc Watson, Emmylou Harris — July 4 
Tom Rush, Leon Redbone, Orleans, Mimi Farina - July 5 
2 Generations of Brubeck - July 12 
Joan Baez - July 19 

Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band - July 23 
Bonnie Raitt - Aug. 9 
Jerry Jeff Walker - Aug. 16 
New Riders Of the Purple Sage - Aug. 30 

LENOX, Mass. (Tanglewoodl 

Steve Stills - June 28 

Gordon Ughtfoot - July 1 

Frankie Valli-Four Seasons - July 8 

Roberta Flack - Blood, Sweat & Tears - July 15 

James Taylor - July 22 

July Collins - July 29 

Linda Ronstadt - Aug. 26 

Helen Reddy 8 Aug. 30 



Las 

Actividades 

de Verano 

Al igual que en todos los anos la 
oficina de actividades de este 
establecimiento educacional, ha 
planeado un programa de caracter 
socio-cultural para este verano, es 
menester recordar que apesar de 
que las condiciones economicas en 
todos los centros sociales han sido 
bastante limitadas, se ha logrado 
elavorar y planificar un programa 
casi completo para satisfacer toda 
la comunidad en general. 

Entre el gran numero de eventos 
ha realizarse ademas de el extenso 
programa deportivo tenemos un 
sinmumero de conciertos, horas 
musicales, peliculas, exhibisiones 
artisticas, peliculas, y oradores. 

Entre los oradores tendremos 
destacados personajes como 
Everett Emerson, Roberto Marquez, 
Robert Suzuki entre otros. Entre los 
conciertos sobresale Preservation 
Hall Jazz Band, Paul Winter, y otros 
grupos muy destacados. 



WMUA 



WMUA, 91.1 F.M. stereo radio, will feature summer programming 
seven days a week. Sundays will feature classical music from 6 a.m. 
to 2 p.m., country music with Mary Lawson from 2 to 6 in the af- 
ternoon, and Jubilation Jazz from 6 p.m. until 2 a.m. Weekdays from 
6 to 10 in the morning will be the Wake-up show with Marc Berman 
and Rocket Rick. Kandi Bourne will air the Universal Rhythms show 
on Thursday nights, 10 until 2. Weeknights, the Sacred Cowboy fills 
up the wee hours from 2 until 6 a.m. 

Public Affairs 

Sunday: 

1:30-2 PM, Tout en Francais 

6-7 PM, Sunday News Collective 
Monday: 

6:15-7 PM, Off the Hook 

10:15-11 PM Focus 
Tuesday: 
Wednesday: 

6:15-7 PM, Off the Hook 

10:15-11 PM, Gaybreak (1st and 3rd) 

10:15-11 PM, We the People (2nd and 4th) 
Thursday: 

6:15-7:00 PM, Off the Hook 
Friday: 

News and Public Service 

High Tides, Monday-Friday, 8:30 AM 

River Valley Almanac, Monday- Saturday, 8:40 AM and 5:30 PM 

News, AM 7, 7:30, 8, 8:30, 9; PM 12, 4, 6, 10 



Public radio station 




UMass Music Professor Walter Chesnut will be displaying brass instruments from all over 
C.C. Concourse. 



Lunch hour 
music series 

Lunch hour music on the Campus Center Con 
course will be a regular feature of the Summer Ac 
tivities program this year. Performances will range 
from classical to traditional to modern, featuring a 
variety of musical styles. 

On Wednesday, June 25 pianist Althea Waites will 
present a program of selections ranging from 
Debussey to Lady Day. The program will feature 
piano solos, Gershwin preludes and other works with 
a wide audience appeal. Waites is a professor of 
music at Smith College. 

On Thursday, June 26 Walter Chesnut will 
demonstrate and discuss the evolution of the trumpet 
from Egyptian times to the present. Chesnut s 
collection of twenty two instruments includes antique 
and modern trumpets, an 1897 pocket coronet, post 
horns and a baroque trumpet. 

During the spring, Chesnut traveled throughout the 
United States and England demonstrating the 
evolution of the trumpet. Chesnut is a professor of 
music at UMass. 

All music hours will be presented at Noon on the 
Campus Center Concourse. Bring your lunch. 




WFCR Open House 



Althe. Walt... Smith College ^^JSSP^SlSlV^cS. 
June 25 as part of the lunch hour music series in th» u.v. 

Concourse. 



Public radio station WFCR has 
announced plans for its second 
annual Open House on Sunday, 
June 29, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at its 
studios in Hampshire House at the 
University of Massachusetts in 
Amherst. Listeners and friends are 
invited to visit the facility and meet 
the staff to sha.e opinions and 
ideas about the station's present 
and future program offerings. Open 
House activities include studio 
tours, live entertainment, and 
opportunities for participation in 
special live programming. Free 
refreshments will be available 
throughout the day. 

Robert J. Lurtsema, host of 
WFCR's "Morning Pro Musica,' 
will be special guest at the Open 
House. Lurtsema will broadcast 
"Morning Pro Musica" live from 
WFCR, and will be available to talk 
with guest during the day, from 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m. 

"Morning Pro Musica, a 
classical music program has 
become immensely popular among 
WFCR listeners since Robert J. 




Robert J. Lurtsema 

Lurtsema became host four years 
ago. Carried live from studios at 
WGBH in Boston, the program has 
been praised by its followers for the 
great variety of compostions played 
and for the enlightening com- 
mentary of Lurtsema. 

General Manager Godwin 
Oyewole said he wished to em- 
phasize that the Open House is not 
a fund-raising event, and there is no 
admission charge. 



"The idea," he said, "is for the 
people to see what the station looks 
like and see the faces behind the 
voices." 

In addition, he said, the occasion 
will allow staff members to become 
acquainted with their listeners, 
whose contributions mean im- 
portant financial support for 
WFCR. 

Open House activities will be held 
outdoors, weather permitting, 
including listener-participation 
programming and live musical by 
several local artists. 

Oyewole said persons who do 
not listen to WFCR are welcome to 
come to Open House and express 
their opinions. 

"If anyone doesn't listen for a 
«-necific reason," the General 
fv, onager said, "this is the time to 
come and express his views." 

WFCR 88.5 FM is a cooperative 
effort of Smith, Amherst, Mount 
Holyoke, and Hampshire Colleges, 
and the University of 
Massachusetts. 



10 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN^ 



MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 — 



MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 



IAN .,.,. , ■ v •/ -. 

- - ■ 

THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



11 



Summer School : courses decreased, cost raised 



by Susan Genser 

Summer school enrollment is 
expected to decline this year due to 
higher tuition costs, although the 
drop may not be very large, ac- 
cording to the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education. 

Last year, total enrollment of 
both undergraduates and graduates 
was 3,074 students. This year 2,500 
students are expected, according to 
Alan Ashton, Director of the Cont. 
Ed. Summer Program. Ashton also 
said enrollments have been coming 
in almost the same rate as last 
summer. 

Because of budget cuts, the 
administration was forced to cut 
back the number of courses usually 
offered during the summer. These 

courses are being offered instead 
by the Division of Continuing 
Education, but the cost to students 
has more than doubled since Cont. 
Ed. is not state subsidized. 

When it became apparent that 
many summer courses would have 
to be dropped. Cont. Ed. agreed to 
pick them up. Much of the 
preliminary arranging had already 
been done by the university, and 
summer courses then became a 
joint venture between the university 
and Cont. Ed. 

Fifty-five courses are being 
offered by the university, and these 
cost $15.00 per credit. (Out-of-state 
students pay $55.00 per credit). 
These courses were chosen by the 
deans of each school or college, 
according to Bertha Auten of the 
Provost's Office. Priority was given 
to seniors graduating in September 
or December, and attempts were 
made to fill their course needs. 
Independent study and special 
program courses (385, 386, 800's, 
and 900's) are also available in each 
department at the same price, 
Auten said. 

Approximately 200 courses are 

being offered through Cont. Ed., 
including 53 evening college 
courses usually offered. The fee for 
these courses is $31.00 per credit, 
which Cont. Ed. charge year round 
for their courses. The figure shows 
an increase of four dollars over the 
past year. Ashton does not feel the 
fee is unreasonable. 

"The lowest price charged by a 
New England state university is 



$25.00 per credit, at the University 
of Maine, and the highest is the 
University of Connecticut, charging 
$35.00 per credit, so our cost 
($31.00 per credit) is not out of 
line," he said. 

Ashton has not heard many 
complaints about the increased 
cost, but Debbie Berstein, Director 
of Public Relations for Cont. Ed. 
has received several. 

"There's a lot of confusion and 
misunderstanding going on," 
Bernstein said. "People don't 
understand that we are non-profit, 
fee-based, and not out to rip-off 
students. Students also don't 
realize that if Cont. Ed. did not pick 
up the program, the courses 
wouldn't have -.been offered, 
regardless of cost." 

Veterans are one group par- 
ticularly unhappy with the new set- 
up. Because Cont. Ed. is not state 
subsidized, there is no tuition 
wa ; ver for veterans. 

"They are irritated that not only 
do they have to pay the tuition, 
they now have to pay twice as 
much," Bernstein said. However 
veterans can still apply for benefits, 
since Cont. Ed. is a recognized 
educational institution. 

Berstein feels Cont. Ed. is doing 
the public a service by offering 
these courses. "We could have told 
the university, no, we won't pick up 
the program, and we would have 
had very high evening course 
enrollment. We decided to pick up 
the program for the student's 
benefit," she said. 

Because the programs offered 
during the 9-month school year are 
costing more, the university 
couldn't afford to pay for summer 
courses this year, according to 
Ashton. 

"The student now has to pay for 
instructors' salaries, along with all 
the rest of it.. All revenue con- 
tributes to the support and running 
of the division," he continued. 

"It's hard to say who's to 
blame," Auten said: "You can't 
blame the university, we operate on 
money given to us by the Com- 
monwealth. This year there simply 
was insufficient funds. We don't 
have the money to operate this 
summer the way we have done in 



the past. 

When the summer program 
became a joint venture, staffs of 
Cont. Ed. and the University" 
planned student activities jointly. 
There will be more summer ac- 
tivities this year, including films, 
exhibits, organized sports, and 
concerts. 

Another advantage of Cont. Ed. 
coordinating the summer program 
with the university is that Cont. Ed. 
Evening College students have 
easier access to day courses. 
Previously they were able to enroll 
in day courses only a space 
available basis. This year, all 
courses are on a first-come, first- 
served basis. 

Summer school courses start 
Tuesday, June 24, and run for eight 
weeks. Most are taught by 
university faculty or a graduate 
student. Both courses and 
professors are approved by the 
university. 

This year, for the first time, Cont. 
Ed. offered a series of three-week 
pre-summer session intensive 
courses in June, and general 
reaction to this program was 
favorable, said Bernstein. 

"There definitely was a need tor 
this type pf program", Berstein 
said. People who failed a course, or 
needed three credits, or who had 
other things to do during the eight- 
week session really appreciated 
them. It makes good sense when 
you're directly dependent on 
students for revenue, to respond to 
their needs." 

Twenty-six courses were 
scheduled to run, and four were 
dropped because of under 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



EDITORS Dan LaBonte, Debbie Schafer 

BUSINESS MANAGER Ken Shapiro 

ADVERTISING Alan Anastos, Gary Williams 

CONTRIBUTORS Richard Wright, E. Patrick McQuaid, Mike Izdepski, 
Mike Moyle, Kris Jackson, Cliff Skibinsky, Susan Genser, Judith 
Wolinsky Soloway, Sue Adley, Rob Melacasa, Mike Kostek, Tuna 
Stewart, Dan Smith, Ed Cohen. 

Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The staff is 
responsible for its content and no faculty member or administrator 
reads it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. Unsigned 
editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not necessarily 
reflect the views of the student body, faculty, or administration. Signed 
editorials, columns, reviews, cartoons, and letters represent the per 
sonal views of the authors. 

The office of the Massachusetts Summer Collegian is on the second 
floor of the Student Union on the campus of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 01002, telephone: 545 1982. 



Start enjoying life at Cliffside today 

WHERE THE EMPHASIS IS ON RECREATION 
THIS SUMMER 




BASKETBALL 

and 

VOLLEYBALL 

Included 



One Bedrooms Start at S165 
Two Bedrooms Start at $195 
Furniture and Air Conditioning Optional 




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Management bv 



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or call 665 3958 

Rt. 116, Sunderland 



enrollment. Approximately 300 
students were enrolled. The fee is 
the same as the eight-week session 
($31.00), and students received the 
customary three credits. 

This program had nothing to do 
with the university summer session 
cutbacks, according to Bernstein. 
"Cont. Ed. had been planning them 
for quite a while," she said. 

Enrollment in summer schools is 



generally declining, nationally, 
according to Ashton, but is in- 
creasing in those schools "who 
have more entry and exit points," 
or who offer more short sessions. 
"We are hoping to have a whole 
continuing series of three-week 
sessions next summer, since they 
have been so popular this year," 
Ashton said. 



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(413) 549 2830 



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Open Daily 9:30-5:30 
Friday til 9:00 549-6670 



OVER 20,000 SWEATERS AT FACTORY PRICI 




II 



Activity 



Entry 
Due 



Play 
Begins 



Minimum 

Players 



Softball 
Men's 
Women's 
Co-Rec 



7-1 
7-1 
7-3 



7-7 
7-7 
7-7 



12 
12 
14 



Timm- 

Deys 

4-7 p.m. | 
M&W 
M& W 
T&TH 



Facility 
Location 



Fields west 
of Boyden 
Building 



Typa Of 
Tovinay 

League Hay 
RR b P 
Playoffs: 
Single 
elimination 



Schedules 



Seasonal: 

Participants 

pick up at 

IM Office on 7-6 



Volleyball 

Men's 

Women's 

Co-Rec 



7-1 
7-1 
7-1 



78 
7-8 
7-8 



4-7 p.m. 

T6TH 
T&TH 
M&W 



Fields west 
of Boyden 
Building 



League Play: 
RR & P. 

Playoffs: 

Single 

Elimination 



Participants 
pick up at 
IM Office on 
7 7 



Badminton 

Men's 
Women's 
Mixed Doubles 



7-7 
7-7 
7-7 



7-10 
7-10 
7-10 



Open 
Open 
Open 



4-9 p.m. 

M-F 
M-F 

M-F 



Main Gym 
in Boyden 
Building 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office on 
7-8-7 10 



Handball Singles 
Men's & Women's 



7-7 7-10 



Open 



Anytime 



Lower level 
in Boyden 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office 



Horseshoes 
Men's Singles 
Women's Singles 
Mixed Doubles 



7-8 7-11 
7-8 7-11 
78 7-11 



Open 
Open 
Ooen 



3-8 p.m. 

M-F 
M-F 
M-F 



Pits west of 
Southwest 
Residence 
Halls 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office 



Paddleball Singles 
Men's And Women's 



7-7 7-11 



Open 



Anytime 



Lower level 
in Boyden 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office 



Tennis 
Men's 
Women's 
Mixed Doubles 



7-7 
7-7 
7-7 



Anytime 



7-10 
7-10 
7 10 



Open 
Open 
Open 



NOPE, 
courts, 
Boyden 
courts 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office on 
7-8-7-9 



Squash Singles 
Men's b Women's 



7-8 7-11 



Open 



Anytime 



Lower level 
in Boyden 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office 



Cross Country 

Men's 
Women's 



7-15 
7-15 



7-15 
7-15 



Open 
Open 



7 p.m. Stadium 
7 p.m. R °»d 



Rac» 

1.7 Mi. 
1.0 Mi. 



Swim Meet 

Men's 
Women's 



6 p.m. 



7-18 
7-18 



7-22 
7 22 



Open 
Open 



Boyden Pool 



Meet: 
Sprints, 
Relays. 
Diving 



Bike Race 

Men's 
Women's 



7-30 
7-30 



7 30 
7-30 



Open 
Open 



7 p.m. 
7 p.m. 



Stadium 
Road 



Rsce 

1.7 Mi. 
1.0 Mi. 



active season planned 

IM Summer Sports 



The Intramural Activities Department is happy to 
announce that they will conduct a Summer Intramural 
Sports Program commencing on June 23th. 
Organized sports will include Softball, volleyball, 
tennis, badminton, horseshoes, a swim meet, bike 
race and cross country race. In addition, squash, hand 
ball and paddleball tournaments will be conducted for 
both men and women. The Boydon Physical 
Education Building will be available at specified 
posted hours for general recreational activity. 

The Intramural Department will administer a three 
part program consisting of Competitive Sports, Co-ed 
Recreational Sports Activities, and Open Play. 

The Competitive Sports Activity Program will in- 
clude a variety of team and individual sports for both 
men and women. In addition, Co-ed competition will 
also be available. For those students who prefer in- 
formal, leisurely workouts on their own, or a relaxing 



dip in the pool, the Open Play Program will avail all 
recreational sports facilities for use when not 
otherwise scheduled. Last year about 2,000 students, 
faculty and staff who actively participated found the 
program to be a rewarding experience physically, 
mentally and socially. 

Information concerning specific activities will be 
distributed at Registration and is available at residence 
halls, as well as the Intramural Office, 215 Boyden 
Building. Al Morris and Steve Hardy will conduct the 
summer program with the assistance of the regular 
intramural staff. The Intramural Office (5-2693, or 5- 
2801) may be contacted anytime between the hours 
of 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and the staff will gladly answer any 
questions pertaining to the Summer Program. 

Anyone interested in officiating intramural softball 
or volleyball should call the above numbers or drop by 
215 Boyden. 




UMASS STUDENT FEDERAL 
CREDITUNION 



SUMMER SAVING 

is easy with an account at 
the Student Credit Union. 

HIGH INTEREST: Expected rate off interest for first 
quarter ending June 28th is SVi per cent. 



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CAMPUS CENTER. Summer hrs. are Tues. & 
Fri., 10 a.m. -3 p.m. 

SERVICES: Include low interest loans to members, 
food stamps sales. Call 545-1994 or stop in for more 
info. 



All accounts 
insured to $40,000. 



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12 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Student leaders active, 
to revamp constitution 



MONDAY JUNE 23, 1975 



by Sue Adley 

Most Senators and people involved in the Student 
Government Association (SGA) have left Amherst for 
the summer. There are some left, however, who will 
be working on SGA business in preparation for the fall 
semester, according to Jon Hite, newly-elected 
speaker of the Senate. 

"One of the big things I will be doing this summer," 
Hite said, "is up-dating the SGA constitution. Brian 
Harvey, community relations coordinator for the 
Senate, will be helping me on that. Brian, though, will 
be working mainly on community relations between 
the Senate and the University. He'll be giving talks on 
the Senate at freshman orientation, and then 
preparing a report on those talks for the first Senate 
meeting." 

Another SGA activity going on this summer will be 




John Hite 



legislative work in Boston. "Sue Rivest, Rick Sa* ni, 
John O'Keefe (newly-elected SGA president) >;nd 
myself will be talking with legislators in relation to the 

budget and other issues," Hite said. "Right now we're 
sending out 'thank-you' letters to the 175 legislative 
reps who voted in our favor to leave the tuition fee as 

it is." 



economic outlook grim 



"The constitution work will probably be the 
toughest thing this summer — at least that I can see", 
he said. "We're working on a new constitution for the 
Senate, a different format. The present one is five to 
ten years out-dated. John O'Keefe and people 
workina with him, Brian Harvey, Mary Ellen Blazon 
and myself will all be involved in this," Hite said. 

What else is the Senate doing this summer about 
the budget? "Not much," according to Hite "because 
of no staff a*nd no money to pay them." "People just 
aren't around now," he said, "and even if they were, 
we'd have no funds to use as pay for their work." 

Hite said that the Student Action Committee (SAC) 
will be doing most of the budget work in the next 
three months. "SAC members such as Ken Somers, 
Brian Harrington and Charlotte Walters will be 
studying the budget and making suggestions as to 
where fat could be cut," he said. 

One thing that Hite himself is doing now and hopes 
to continue in the fall is having lunches with 
University administrators. "This is a move toward a 
better relationship between the Senate and the ad- 
ministration," he said. "I always go, and sometimes 
different people from the Senate join me." 

"It's been a very busy summer so far," Hite said. 
"We're getting caught up on constitutional and 
legislative work that, up till now, had been neglected. 
Brian hopefully will improve our relationship with the 
town and University communities. We're trying to 
simplify what the Senate does so more people will 
understand what goes on." 

Basically where does the relationship problem lie 
between the town and the Senate, the University and 
the Senate? "The governance system at UMass is a 
very complicated thing," Hite said. "If people un- 
derstand it, they're half-way there. We're going to try 
to get a lot more people involved in student govern- 
ment next semester. Hopefully we'll have a very 
productive year. We'll be working in the areas of a 
credit union and a stereo co-op. Hopefully by January 
we'll have set up a job bank to plug people into area 
jobs." 

"Lots of times being involved in the Senate is 
thankless because people don't realize what the 
Senate does," Hite said. "That's our own fault, 
though. We do have lots of community-oriented 
projects that people are involved with every day such 
as the Collegian, WMUA, and the bus service. People 
just don't realize that these things are Senate- 
supported. A lot of people work hard here and don't 
feel like they're getting any credit or support for it. 
Because of this, we're trying to build up the Senate." 

"Unfortunately," Hite said, "the Senate was not set 
up to be an advocacy body. Instead, it's a legislative 
body. In time, I'd like to see it be an advocacy body, 
creating economic initiatives for students." 



The Job Market Slump 



by Judith Wolinsky Soloway 

It doesn't take a crystal ball to see how poor the off- 
campus summer job situation is for students seeking 
employment in this area. Aggravating the situation is 
the increasing number of students who find Amherst 
beautiful and quiet in the Summer and opt to stay. 

Not only have individuals been pounding on many 
doors seeking employment but also groups who are 
seeking summer jobs for their constituents. One such 
on campus group is the Veterans Affairs Office Job 
Bank (JB). In the past two years of existence, over 
100 jobs per summer were found for veterans through 
this service. 

Indicative of the general job slump, this summer is 
the bleakest for locating jobs. According to Bill 
Dodge, Co-Coordinator, only 30 veterans have been 
placed in temporary or part-time positions by the JB 
this year. 

When this years JB search started in early April, 
contacts were made with area employers by mail, 
telephone, and in person by Dodge and his staff. 800 
persons were contacted just by direct mailing or via 
Chamber of Commerce newsletters. 

To augment the early push, Dodge contacted in 
person prospective employers in every -business 
establishment in downtown Amherst, Northampton, 
and the Mountain Farms Mall about jobs. 

"I found the personnel managers I talked to friendly 
and helpful" Dodge admits, "but extremely 
pessimistic about hiring additional help." 

The reasons most often given for not hiring were 
that business in general is so bad that they have been 
forced to make personnel cutbacks, and also 
businessmen have hired family members who are out 
of work. The latter reason was given by a majority of 
Northampton businesses. 

Dodge, who is now very familiar with the area job 
market adds additional reasons to the dearth of jobs. 

• 



"There used to be a turnover in jobs when 
graduating seniors gave up their usual summer and 
part-time jobs to seek permanent employment 
elsewhere. This year when the senior left, the 
positions were cut out." 

Plus, students who couldn't find jobs elsewhere for 
the summer are staying in the area, adding to the 
numbers. 

Students are also closed out of the market by local 
residents seeking the same jobs. 

There have been positions located for the JB. They 
tend to be low-paying non-skilled laborer positions. 

Before the economic "slump", a non-skilled laborer 
was offered at least $3.00 per hour. Now employers 
can find willing workers at $2.50 per hour. 

In addition to non-skilled laborer jobs, other 
positions found include life guards, cooks, bartenders, 
and gas station attendants. 

Dodge experienced frustration in his pursuit to 
expand the Veterans Job Bank file. In spite of this, he 
is still determined to find more jobs. 

"At first we approached the job search in a 
traditional manner — by mail. Mailings only resulted in 
a few calls. I thought, rather optimistically, that it 
would take meeting people face-to-face to succeed. 
But I got depressed as I went to area employers and 
got little or no response." 

Dodge is making additions and changes to future 
JB searches this summer. Hs plans to contact em- 
ployers in areas that have not been reached before, 
Springfield and Holyoke. 

His philosophy about the JB has changed since 
discovering summer jobs are few and far between. 
Rather than considering success only in terms of 
actually finding the jobs. Dodge now places equal 
importance on notifying area businessmen that the JB 
exists and is a source of workers. 

No, it doesn't take a crystal ball to see the poor off- 
campus summer job situation, but it may take a 
crystal- ball to find a job. 



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57 E. Pleasant St. 
Amherst 5491116 



4L 




LANDRY'S MAR KET 

The Oldest Grocery in Amherst 

This Week Wednesday thru Tuesday 
—including COLD Beer 

SCHLITZ — 12 oz. cans — SI. 39 six pack $5.55 case 

PIELS — l2oz non-returnables — $1.09 six pack $4. 35 case 

BALLANTINE ALE — 12 oz. cans — $1.25 six pack $4.95 case 

HIENEKEN — 12 oz. non-returnables — $3.59 six pack $14.25 case 
PIELS — $1.09 six pack $4.25 case 

DELMONI CO STEAK $2.29 lb. 

Boneless Rib-eye ROAST $2.25 lb. 

BOTTOM ROUND CORN BEEF $1.29 lb. 

Fresh Lean GROUND BEEF (not more than 30 per cent fat) 

75 cents lb. 
SLAB BACON (chunk or sliced) $1.19 lb 



Vermont Fresh MILK — 73 cents '2 gal. 

Cabot's (1 yr. old) Vt. CHEDDAR CHEESE 

CABOT'S BUTTER 

ICEBERG LETTUCE 

FRESH SWEET CORN 

FRESH SUMMER SQUASH 

BANANAS 

Pure Natural Hardwood CHARCOAL 



$1.43 gal. 

$1.49 lb. 

89 cents lb. 

3 heads for $1.00 

10 cents an ear 

29 cents lb. 

19 cents lb. 

8 lb. bag $1.29 



711 Main St. Amherst 2 53 5387 

On the Belchertown Bus Route 

■ 




The inside of our shoe is unique. Like your foot. That's 
why we've developed a heat sensitive footbed that molds 
to your feet. Birkenstocks don't feel like conventional 
shoes, because they aren't. 

BlRkenstock 

the 
oRfgfnaL 
footprint 

sanoaL 

exclusively offered by 



QOLDCN 
TEHPLE 

rnpoKNn 



Brown 9 



T'.!<; 



Amnvrtt 

Profttiionil 

L— Building — I 



N Plnuni St 




New Hours. 

11 00 5 30 Mon Sat. 



178A N Pleasant St /Amherst/256 0360 



MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 

THE WIZARD OF ID 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



13 




B.C 



by johnny hart 




Kris Jaekton 




©/Vf,*/* J k» Sei««t.f.t Comiw k»kwr>Tori« s 




VEMWEU..aU£NTIN 1 UEShAU WOWfHTMPTTWETHAVEl. 
BV ftOOING NEGATIVE FLUX TO THE SUBSTRATE 
MATRIX Of OOR UWIVERSt.t WANT 

HOOK UP THE UoQ^AO 




' * AT Y\\VA] AT ES* * 
OF SMITH COLLEGE 

i/OOEMY"; 



urn* 



iWLSC 



NORTHAMPTON 



ends TUE 7:15 9:00 

"FunnyCar 
Summer" 




m 






Ml, 

- MONTUE Dollar Night t 

^■■■■■■■■■■■O 



•••••••••••*•••••••••••••••••••• 

Goto question? Goto gripe? 
Write a letter to the Editor 

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a-*** 




Globe Theater 

Northampton 586-0935 

Sun. Tues. 

at7:10&9:10 

Polanskis 

"The Fearless 
Vampire Killers" 

Sharon Tate& 
Roman Polanski 



Your Stars This Week 

By Stella Wilder 



Only an acute observer of the 
celestial scene could mark the 
point at which, here and there, 
the stable becomes the agitated, 
the normal becomes the ec- 
centric. And as the planets only 
very subtly, very unobtrusively 
give away their present lack of 
steadfastness, so do men, both 
collectively and as individuals, 
struggle to hide their restless- 
ness, their lack of certainty as 
the coming week, begun on a 
note of hesitation, unfolds ten- 
sions and a climate for conflict 
all along the way. Week's end 
should find many at the point of 
exhaustion as they hear the 
finish of six days of higH.-tension 
energy consumption, .often 
coupled with the confusion that 
accompanies frustrations of all 
sorts. 

Those who are wise will at- 
tempt to move with the tide 
rather than to fight against cur- 
rents which will prove to be ex- 
ceptionally strong this week. 
Taking cues from the young well 
may be extremely productive in 
the long run, however, for the 
young, though they claim inde- 
pendence, are very much in- 
clined to run with the pack, 
which, in turn, runs with the 
spirit of the times. Efforts to 
bring personal relationships into 
sharper focus well may yield 
more in the way of gain than 
anything else over the next few 
days 

CANCER (June 21-July 7) - 
There is much to be ac- 
complished this week make the 
most, therefore, of the initial two 
or three days. Past experience 
yields good advice. (July 8-July 
22) — You will be forearmed if 
you will take warnings seriously, 
otherwise, you will be taken by 
surprise even though events 
have been forecast. 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 7) - The 
wise Leo will relax and let things 
happen as they will. The more 
you attempt to fashion events to 
your liking, the more confused 
they may become. (Aug 8-Aug. 
22) — Before embarking upon a 
new endeavor, seek the advice 
of loved ones. You may have 
more support than you thought - 
though not financially. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 7) - If 
you would avoid argument with 
higher ups this week, consult 
them before - not after - you in- 
dulge in certain activities. Con- 
sider consequences. (Sept. 8- Sept 
22) — If you would make gains 
by week's end. cooperate with 
coworkers - and see to it that 
they cooperate with you. Time is 
of the essence 

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 7) - 
Those issues not of concern to 
you personally, you would do 
well to skirt - at least for the 
time being Recognize a friend's 
dilemma. (Oct. 8-Oct. 7) - A 
good hobby is the best of healers. 
You can make short work of 
career disappointment if you 
will engage seriously in leisure- 
time activity. 
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov 7) - 



Creative endeavor is the secret 
to successfully overcoming emo- 
tional upset early in the week 
Don't allow yourself to indulge in 
self-pity. (Nov. 8-Nov 21) - You 
would do well not to rest on your 
laurels today Any attempt to 
ride on a reputation is going to 
prove bumpy this week. Move 
forward! 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 
Dec. 7) — Personality and tact 
go hand in hand this week to 
produce by week's end the knd 
of success that brings with it 
material gain. (Dec 8-Dec 22) - 
Though desire and necessity 
may not coincide, you will do 
yourself and loved ones a favor 
by going after what you want 
rather than what vou need. 

CAPRICORN (Dec 22- Jan .6) 

— Don't mistake giving in for 
cooperation Stick to your princi- 
ples early in the week and you 
won't hav • to compromise at 
week's end. (Jan 7-Jan. 19) — If 
you are too easily persuaded to 
change your mind on an impor- 
tant issue, you may well lose 
stature in the eyes of those who 
generally support vou. 

AQUARIUS (Jan 20-Feb. 3) 

— Events occurring early in the 
week do not necessarily lead to 
later happenings Enjoy a new 
experience; it may be short- 
lived. (Feb 4-Feb 18) - This 
promises to be a full week of 
labor Conserve your energy 
when and where you can - but 
don't be surprised to end the 
week in need of rest. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 5) - 
Fear and nervous tension could 
cause you to taint a particularly 
exciting week. Enjoy it instead 
Make it a point not to listen to 
tales of woe. (March 6-March 20) 

— Unless you are talented at an- 
ticipating what others will do. 
you would be better off sticking 
strictly to your own business, A 
week for gains. 

ARIES (March 21 -April 4) - 
Take care that an error in judg- 
ment early in the week doesn't 
cause you to fall far behind your 
schedule by week's end. Look 
before you leap (April 5- April 19) 

— Avoid becoming overtired 
early in the week. You will need 
to have reserves of energy ready 
to meet special demands by 
week's end. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 5) - 
Deal with matters as they occur. 
If you attempt to put off until 
later in the week what you could 
do in the next day or so, you will 
incur a loss. (May 6-May 22) - 
Changes may well be in order, 
especially at home. Neverthe- 
less, you must consult all who 
are involved before you begin 

GEMINI (May 21-June 6) - 
Think over events of the recent 
past before you try to meet the 
challenge inherent in events of 
the next few days. Time is on 
vour side. (June 7-June 22) — 
New friends make the next day 
or so more exciting than you had 
anticipated. Nevertheless, the 
week in general calls for conser- 
vative actions. 

(<f»r«tfl. I9R I ntorl r'ttttav S\ti1» -ju In 



NOW 

Complete Uncut Version 




AMHERSTCW** 



AMITY ST. 



253 5426 



YOU'LL LOVE 
HER PLATFORM! 

« i.i w mi i ii w co*po*«tiom on uv 



air conditioned: eves. 7:00 & 900 Sat & Sun. I 30 



MONDAY & TUESDAY BARGAIN NlTFS • AIL SEATS $1 00 




« « 



« i 









14 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975 — 



The Whole University Co-op 



"I'm so happy you decided to stay open this 
summer," remarked a customer as the cash register 
sang on the opening day of The People's Market. 

For the first time in it's brief but successful two year 
history, The People's Market will be in operation this 
summer. Offerings will include everything from Mung 
Beans and Bulgher — (which looks alot like cooked 
wheat germ) — to fresh produce the likes of eggplant, 
avacados, and strawberries to canned Comstock 
Apple Pie Filling. Even Joe Namath's old pal Ovaltine 
graces the Market's shelves. 

Tenatively scheduled for a five-day-a-week, ten-to- 
five business timetable, the market may expand it's 
daily hours to include Saturdays in it's program. This 
will depend on the flow of customers, according to 
Jeanuh Whiteredge, one of the Market's summer 
coordinators. 

Located in the southeast corner on the first floor of 
the Student Union building, The People's Market is a 
non-profit Recognized Student Organization (RSO). 

This explains why prices for most items in the 
Market are comparatively cheaper than other area 
stores and supemarkets. All monies received by the 
Market are deposited into the RSO account, who, in 
turn, pay the overhead operating costs. Any profit 
made by the Market is used to by additional or new 
equipment — refrigerators, scales, and things. Since 
the Market buys directly from the wholsaler, prices are 
kept at a competitive minimum. Being a non-profit 
organization enables the Market to also keep mark- 
ups low. 

"Dairy products like cheese are big demand items 
that we buy directly from Boston. I've heard the mark- 
up is as much as 50 percent in some stores. Here it's 
only 18 percent," explained Kate Sumberg, the 
Market's other full time summer coordinator. 

Technically, the People's Market is a cooperative, 
however, there are no dues, no membership is 
required, and the Market is open to all students, 
university employees, and local residents. 

"Theoretically, the whole university is a member," 
explained Sumberg. 



CASPER * 




Self-service et the People's Market helps to 
keep overhesd expenses down, msking goods 
available at reduced cost to the consumer. Ralph 
Lopez is shown weighing an oder of lentils. 



eases course choice 



Computer Assistance to Student Preparing to Elect courses for Registration 



by Rob Melascasa 

Development of a computer 
based retrieval system of course 
information is currently being 
sponsored by the University 
Computing Center, CASIAC, and 
BDIC. 

The system, called CASPER 
(Computer Assistance to Students 
Preparing to Elect courses for 
Registration) has the potential to 
broaden the scope of course in- 
formation available to the student 
by indexing courses by content and 
characteristics. Students will be 
able to choose from a larger 
selection of courses which fulfill the 
specific requirements they seek. 

As a supplement to the Course 
Description Guide, students using 
Casper will be able to see at a 
glance what core requirement is 
met, what course tools are used, 
the course format, course level, 
expected class size, to whom the 
course is open, to whom the 
course is geared, and the type of 
pre- requisites, if any. 

For example, a student needs a D 
core requirement course. He or she 
likes history, economics, and 
political science, prefers large 
lecture? and small discussion 
groups, enjoys reeding, cannot 
tolerate papers, and doesn't want 
anything too technical or advanced. 

With these requirements in mind 
the student will sit at a computer 
terminal (which looks like an or- 
dinary typewriter) and type in 
several key words detailing the 
criteria he seeks. Casper will then 
search its records of all courses 
offered that semester until it finds 
one or more courses which meet 
the students specifications. 

Upon request, Casper will then 
list the course or courses which 
apply. If a student is interested in a 
particular course he has heard 
about or seen in the CDG, Casper 
has the ability to display stored data 
on any course for which it has a 
record. When fully developed this 
entire process should take less than 



a minute. 

Peter DiGiammarino, one of the 
systems designers suggested that 
the student then take the process 
one step further, by checking 
Casper's course list with CDG, 
talking with Departments heads, 
advisors, friends who may have 
taken the course, or the instructors 
themselves. ><s * s ^ 

Problems of information integrity 
and maintenance will be lessened. 
Instructors will simply fill in printed 
questionaires detailing specific 
criteria for each course and mail it 
in for storing in Casper's records. 

These course profiles will contain 
only that information pertinent to 
course content and characteristic, 
and all instructors will list the same 
type of information. Any additional 
questions wiil. be answered by the 
instructor. * 

These course profiles are easily 
updated each semester. Courses 
that are not being changed in any 
way will not require any updating 
and any changes to be made can be 
accomplished easily and accurately. 
The files will be constantly updated 
and reviewed to insure the ac- 
curacy of- the information. 

Casper will also keep track of 
trends of course selection by 
keeping records of user tran- 
sactions, that is, student queries 
and computer output. Analysis of 
these fends could have great 
bearing on future course offerings, 
and the expansion of those 
academic areas which appear to be 
focal points of student interest. 
This aspect of the new system 
greatly interests the administration, 
enough so to warrant financial 
support for further research and 
development. 

During this summer, students 
attending the orientation sessions 
will have a test version of Casper at 
their disposal, and will be en 
couraged to employ the system to 
assist them in choosing courses for 
the fall semester. According to Dr. 
Conrad Wogrin, director of the 



University Computing Center, this 
summer's test is very important. He 
considers Casper's potential as 
"boundless", but at this stage it is 
still "wait and see". 

The cost of a full scale system 
will be great — although this sum- 
mer's test will cost almost nothing, 
since there will be no specialized 
computer equipment necessary — 
and the usefulness of the system 
must first be ascertained. The only 
way this' can be accomplished is 
through the analysis of feedback 
from students actually using the 
system. Dr. Wogrin expressed 
some concern over the "com- 
plexity" of the system. 

"I would hate to see the 
academic community become too 
technological. There is just so much 
course information to be digested, 
that any way we can devise for 
channelling this data for the 
student's use will be both useful 
and progressive," he said. Wogrin 
emphasized that Casper is only an 
aid to students, an alternative. This 
is not going to be the only way for 
students to make course choices. 

If this summer's test results are 
adequate, this fall could see a more 
advanced version implemented for 
the increased student load. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Wogrin, the 
designers of the system are in no 
hurry. 

"We've gotten by without it 
somehow all these years, and if one 
or two classes graduate without 
having used it, that can't be helped. 
It is better to take our time and do it 
right," he said. 

Casper has the support of the 
BDIC office and CASIAC, and is 
being developed through the 
facilities of the Graduate Research 
Center. 

The use of the system has been 
simplified to typing key words and 
phrases as commands to the 
computer with the aid of a 
counselor. The computer language 

continued on pg. 15 



v ^a/ RESTAURANT 



The Finest Oriental & Polynesian 
Food In This Area 

We prepare all your 
favorite foods and tropical 
drinks just the way you 
like. 

Everything on the menu 
can be ordered to take out. 



, /MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1975, 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



IS 



♦ 

a Open Daily til lOp.m 
j ROUTE 9 



Special luncheon Menu P$lff 



11:30a.m. -3p.m. 
( Except Sun. & Holidays) 

Fri. & Sat. till a.m. 



I 



2560251 



AMHERST, MASS. 






BEFORE YOU RENT 
SEE 

Hadley Village Apts. 

BEAUTIFUL— QUIET— SPACIOUS 

2 bedroom townhouses 
3- room apartments 

Large in-ground pool. 

On Rte. 202 So. Hadley, Mass. 

1 Mi. north of Rte. 33 
Tel. 532-9410 



BELL'S PIZZA HOUSE 




65 UNIVERSITY DRIVE 

Pizza • Spaghetti 
Grinders 

INCREDIBLY 

GOOD 

CREDIBLY 

PRICED! 

Call 256-8011 For Fast Service. 



rtediHou! 



eweief 




Jewelry Watches 

Fine China Silver 

Giftware 

Amherst, Mass. 
253-7615 



Chino Army 
Pants 

ily $2.50 



<*12T\ Ha ^ L 9- selection of 

$^\ ** Blue jMn$ 

iirvw 




ts* 



Used Westerns, Flannels 
& Hawaiian Shirts 

You have to see to believe! 

Look for us at 65 University Drive 

Next to Bells and Hampshire Veternarian 

Open Daily 10-6 Friday eves till 9 



JFK assassination 

Controversy unsettled, 
prompts area action 

AMHERST — New controversy surrounding the 1963 assassination of 
President John F. Kennedy has prompted a group of concerned area 
citizens to urge Congress to re-open the investigation of Kennedy's death. 

The group, Western Massachusetts Assassination Information Bureau, 
is headed by David Joyce of Amherst, a UMass history student who last 
Fall completed a lengthy research paper highly critical of the major con- 
clusions of the Warren Commission. 

The Warren Commission was the blue-ribbon Federal commission 
appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson to investigate the cir- 
cumstances of JFK's death. Joyce challenges the Warren Commission's 
contention that it was Lee Harvey Oswald, a lone assassin, who killed 
President Kennedy. 

On Tuesday, July 1, the group will sponsor a public showing of the 
controversial 16-mm Zapruder film (actual color movie footage of the 
assassination, at 7 P.M. in the Student Union Ballroom on the University of 
Massachusetts campus. The two-hour presentation will also feature more 
than 100 slides of photographs — some never before seen publicly — 
which, Joyce and other Warren Commission critics maintain, prove 
conclusively that President Kennedy was shot by more than one assassin. 

Members of the press and area politicians are invited to attend a private 
showing of the Zapruder film and other photographic evidence on June 26, 
7 P.M., in Room 905 of the Murray D. Lincoln Campus Center at the 
University of Massachusetts. 




• • 



C£aMi(jiaU 



WANTED 



INSTRUCTIONS 



BOB STILL WANTS your ailing or 
dacraplt cart Faat If for tha hulk, 
263-7887. 

. ROOMMATE WANTED 

RESPONSIBLE M-F ROOMATE. 
OWN RM..3 BDRM. TOWNHOUSE. 
BUS LINE. POOL. TENNIS. NO 
LEASE. FURNISHED. $100 W-UTIL. 
BOB 253 7967 

ROOMATES WANTED FOR 2 

Bdrm. apt. Brandvwlna for 
aummar. 60 par mo. Call Joa, B4S- 
4414. 



MOTORCYCLES 



EXPERT TUNE-UP8 AND 
REPAIRS on Kawaaakl, Triumph* 
and Harlays. all work guarantaad, 
call Jon 641 2859. 



AUTO MECHANICS CLAS8, a 
baaic court* for man and woman. 
Work and laarn on your own car. 
Maata ona avoning par waak for 
four waaka and includaa a 
Saturday workshop claaa. Coat ia 
$11. For Information call. 649-2800. 



AUTO FOR SALE 



SERVICES 



BOB WILL STILL FIX YOUR CAR 
RIGHT. Any maka, jr., modal. No 
job to small. 263-7987. 

UNION STERQO COOP allva and 
thriving, campua cantar, M-W-F, 10 
a.m. -4 p.m. 



1987 PLYMOUTH VIP HARDTOP 
— powar atoarlng, powar brakaa, 
automatic tranamlaalon. split 
banch w-1 reclining. $300. Call Ed 
684-1316 ovoa. 

68 PEUGEOT, SUN ROOF, drlva It 
away for $100. Naada battary. Bob 
263-7987. 

~7? VEGA. IMMACULATE 39.000 
mllas. 26 mpg. 3 apd. trans., only 
$1186. Bob 263-7987. 

70 FIAT 880 COUPE SUPER CAR. 
40*J mpg. Naw Radlala, 68000 mllas. 
$760. 263-7887. 

MOVING MUST SELL 1966 
Muatang axcallant condition. 
Ownad by machanic, 263-9311. 

69 RAMBLER REBEL, 9 Oft 26 

mpg. automatic p-t. axclallant 
shapa. $660. 263-7967. 



TOWNEHOUSE 

of Amherst 

Two and three bedroom townhouses, with wall-to-wall carpets, 1-1/2 baths, 
dishwasher, garbage disposal, self-cleaning oven. FROM $225. 

Pool and recreational facilities, safe playground for children, FREE UMass 
Bus service. 

Open for your intpection 7 days a week. 



50 Meadow St.. Amherst, Mass. 



549-0600 



|BRANDYWINE, the apartment plus community "1 

! 



i 



Nim iifii'ii (or >nur inspection arc HH.WDYMIMv'S 
beautiful new one and l»o bedroom model apart- 
minis 

( nmniMT for a \ isit an\ da> of the week. 
In a few minutes we'll show \oo all the reasons in the 
aafttwBJ BKWDVHIVK is a better place to live. We 
inv id Mm to compare features and compare prices. 





BRANDYWINE 

at Amherst 



One and two bedroom units from $220.00 



Cnnvsmtncsi which maka SRANDYWINE 

SO eminently livable" include 

Spacious, wall laid out units 

All brand name ftfwtit.e Appliances. Includ 
■ no garbage disposal and dishwasher. 

Individually controlled central gas haet 

Central Air Conditioning. 

An abundance of ctoeet space 

Extra security features including intercom 
system 

Large, partially enclosed, private patios and 
balconlae 

Luxurious well to-well carpeting 

Beautiful new ewlmmlng pool and 
racraattonol feelHtiea 

Beautiful well kept grounds, highlighted by 
large central pond 

Free UMass Bus Service 

Laundry facilities well located 

Safe pteyg-ound for children 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
Furniture Leeslng Company. Hartford, 
Connecticut 

Resident Superintendent responsible for all 
apartment services and maintenance Provid- 
ing prompt service 7 deys a week 



1 »y^ti«^T ^^ 


■ 

s 


•■■BBBr" w\ 




n pWlasma 


4 


kr 



I 
1 

I 



Brandywine Drive 

Amherst 
549-0600 



Senior Day Spirits" 



• JFK site uncertain 



continued from pg. 5 

and Boston. 

The original site ottered at 
Amherst was in the Fraternity- 
Sorority park area. This was later 
dropped in favor of a site of 7 to 15 
acres northwest of the School of 
Engineering. It was projected that 
traffic problems would be less at 
the latter site. 

Approval for an Amherst site 
seems to have been almost 
unanimous. The towrw meetings of 
Amherst and many surrounding 



towns have endorsed the library as 
has the UMass Student Senate, 
Representative James Collins, and 
many Western Massachusetts 
unions. In addition, says Grady, a 
"large number" of letters favoring 
an Amherst library have been 
written to the library corporation. 
Whether the library is built in 
Amherst or Boston, Direcotr Fenn 
says he will try to bring the benefits 
of the library to both campuses. In 
his words: "I would be delighted to 
associate with UMass, Amherst 
and Boston." 



•Taxes, Fees raised 




continued from pg. 3 

further look into the matter," he 
added. 

Warren expressed dissatisfaction 
in mandatory dining hall services. "I ' 
don't like to run an operation where 
students are forced to buy a meal 
plan. An ideal situation would be to 
run * an operation similar to a 
restaurant where people come to 
eat there because they want to," he 
said. 

However, alternatives to the 
mandatory dining commons policy 
are only in the discussion stage, 
according to Warren. 

Aside from raising the cost of the 
ten-meal a week board plan from 
$308.25 to $328 per semester, the 
dining commons will otter a 14- 
meal plan to replace the elimination 
of the 15-meal plan, and extend the 
option to include weekend meals. 
For $348 a semester, students will 
be able to choose any 14 meals a 
week including brunch and or 
dinner on Saturday and Sunday. All 
19 weekly meals, three daily meals 
and a brunch and dinner on 
weekends, can be bought for $408 
per semester. 

The new seven day service "will 
offer alot more flexibility and better 
satisfy student's needs. We felt we 
weren't doing the whole job by 
offering only a five day plan," 
Warren said in a recent interview. 
Other Action 

Stockbridge students will have to 
pay an additional $9 per year in 
student senate taxes next year and 
graduate students will face an $8 
per year increase in taxes as a result 
of other trustee voting. The tax 



increases, approved by both the 
Stockbridge and Graduate Student 
Senates, will provide revenue to 
expand their respective service 
organizations and related 
programs. 

The trustees also voted to 
establish co-payment rates for eye 
care and dental services at the 
infirmiry. The cost of these services 
will not affect the Student Health 
Fee, which will remain at $92 per 
year. The fee for eye examinations 
will be fixed at $10 per visit, while 
the cost of dental services will vary 
according to the nature of the 
student's dental problem. Some 
dental services, including an initial 
oral exam and prescription of drugs 
are included in the student health 
fee. 

Other trustee action related to 
the UMass-Amherst campus in- 
clude a $2 per year increase in 
Telephone fees in dormitories 
where the fee is applicable, in 
anticipation of the New England 
Telephone Company's recent 
request for increased rates. The 
trustees also voted to the approval 
of various fees in the International 
Program to cover travel, lodging, 
and other living expenses of 
students participating in the dif- 
ferent foreign programs. 

A 5 cent an hour increase in the 
Campus Center garage parking 
rates was also approved by the 
board. The increase is expected to 
generate $21,000 in additional 
revenue to reduce the present 
deficit level to approximately 
$132,000. 



• Casper's choice 



continued from pg. 14 

may be further simplified during the 
development of the system. Casper 
is set up and operating in Rm. 108 
Herter Hall, and will be manned 
during normal working hours. Peter 



V."» '. ,,"'■') .'I ■ • '■ n 
•V ,-, • 



■ •'.'/.. 



. 



• • I 



DiGiammarino, Reid Frazier or Paul 
DiGiammarino will be happy to 
explain the system l_» anyone in- 
terested. The office number is 5- 
3316. 

•> . ! | • 



16 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



MONDAY. JUNE 23, 1975, 



Music and Dance 



June 25. Wed. 
June 26. Thur. 
June 26, Thur. 

June 26, Thur. 



June 26, Thur. 



July 3, Thur. 
July 6, Sun. 



July 9, Wed. 
July 10, Thur. 
July 10, Thur. 



12:00 noon 
CC Concourse 

12:00 noon 
CC Concourse 

2:00 p.m. 

Music Rehearsal 

rm 44, Fine 

Arts Center 

2:00 p.m. 

Commonwealth 

Room.S.U. 



8:00 p.m. 

Metawampee 

lawn (rain 

location-SU 

ballroom) 

12:00 p.m. 
CC Concourse 

2:00 p.m. 

Metawampee 

Lawn (rain 

location-Bowker 

Aud.) 

12:00 noon 
CC Concourse 



MUSIC HOUR 
ALTEA WAITES 



with 



MUSIC HOUR with 
WALTER CHESNUT 

OPEN BAND 

WORKSHOP with THE 
DETROIT FOUR 



July 17, Thur. 
July 17, Thur. 



OPEN 
DANCE 
ALBERT 
GIBSON 



MASTE R 

CLASS with 

& SANDRA 

AND THE 



MAD GIBSONS 

CONCERT with THE 
DETROIT FOUR and 
THE MAD GIBSONS 



MUSIC HOUR with 
SHEEHAN'S REEL 

STEPHEN GASKIN & 
THE FARM BAND 



July 17, Thur. 



12:00 noon 
Metawampee Lawn 

8:00 p.m. 

Metawampee 

lawn (rain 

location-Fine 

Arts Center) 

12:00 noon 

CC Concourse 



MUSIC HOUR with 
BILL HALL & SCOTT 
NELSON 

MUSIC HOUR with 
PAUL WINTER 
CONSORT 

CONCERT with PAUL 
WINTER CONSORT 



MUSIC HOUR with 
"THE UNITY EN- 
SEMBLE" 

July 17, Thur. 



July 22, Tue. 
July 23, Wed. 



August 7, Thur. 
August 13, Wed. 

August 14, Thur. 
August 14, Thur. 



August 14, Thur. 



August 14, Thur. 



2:00 p.m. 

Women's Phys 

ed Bldg. 

8:00 p.m. 

Metawampee 

Lawn (rain 

location-SU 

Ballroom) 

12:00 noon 
CC Concourse 

8:00 p.m. 

Metwampee 

Lawn (rain 

location-Fine 

Arts Center) 

12:00 noon 
CC Concourse 

12:00 noon 
CC Concourse 



12:00 noon 
CC Concourse 



2:00 p.m. 

Music Rehear. 

. Rm 44, Fine 

Arts Center 

2:00 p.m. 

Women's PE 

Bldg. 

8:00 p.m. 

Metawampee 

Lawn (rain 

location-Bowker 

Aud) 



OPEN MAST E R 
DANCE CLASS 

CONCERT with "THE 
UNITY ENSEMBLE" 
and THE MARLA 
BLAKEY DANCERS 

MUSIC HOUR with ART 
ANDREWS 

PRESERVATION 
HALL JAZZ BAND 



MUSIC HOUR with 
DOROTHY ORNEST 



MUSIC HOUR 
LEON DUNNELL 



with 



MUSIC HOUR with 
"MANIFESTATIONS" 



OPEN BAND 

REHEARSAL with 
"MANIFESTATIONS" 

OPEN MAST E R 
DANCE CLASS 



CONCERT with 
"MANIFESTATION" 



2:00 p.m. 

Music Rehear. 

Rm 44 Fine 

Art Center 



OPEN BAND 
REHEARSAL with 
"THE UNITY EN 
SEMBLE" 



SUMMER ACTIVITIES 



All events sponsored by Summer Activities are free 
to UMass summer students and fee paying conference 
participants. The general public will be admitted as 
space permits. 



Film 



8.00 p.m. 
June 25, Wed. 



July 2, Wed. 
July 9, Wed. 

July 16, Wed. 

July 24, Thur. 

July 30, Wed. 

August 6, Wed. 

August 13, Wed. 






C.C.Aud. "THE SWIMMER" 

with Burt Lancaster 

C.C.Aud. "MANDABI" 

By Ousmane Sembene 

SU Ballroom "THE KING OF 

MARVIN GARDENS" 

with Jack Nicholson 

C.C.Aud. "AN AUTUMN AF- 
TERNOON" 

by Uasujiro Osu 

C.C.Aud. "LONG DAYS JOUR- 
NEY INTO NIGHT" 

with Katharine Hepburn 
C.C.Aud. "FIREMEN'S BALL" 
by Milos Borman 
F 
SU. Ballroom "THE PRIEST AND 

THE GIRL" 

by Joaquim Pedro 

Thorn 104 "LOVE JOY'S NUCL- 
EAR WAR" 






Gallery 



June 24 July 1 

July 3 July 8 
July 10 July 15 

July 20- July 26 

Aug. 3 Aug 9 



SU Gallery HOWARD McCALLEBB 

sculpture exhibit 

S.U. Gallery "STOR I ES" 

a group show by area artists. 
S.U. Gallery p H OTO SHOW 

area photographers display 
S.U. Gallery BOSTON AREA 

PRINTMAKERS 

S.U.Gallery OBJ ECT( IONAB L ES) 

Don Milliken 



• II 




July 15. Wed. 

July 22. Tue. 
July 30, Wed. 



7:00 p.m. 
Stadium Road 



6:00 p.m. 
Boyden Pool 

7:00 p.m. 



MEN'S & WOMEN'S 
CROSS COUNTRY 
RACE 

MEN'S & WOMEN'S 
SWIM MEET 



MEN'S & WOMEN'S 

otaaium rioad nii/'p DAfC 



Bicententennial Lecture Series 



2:00 p.m. Colonial lounge 



June 24, Tue. 



"LITERATURE OF 
THE PIONEER 
VALLEY IN THE 17th & 
18th CENTURY" 

Everett Emerson, President, 
Amherst Historical Society 



July 8, Tue. 



July 1. Tue. 



"HOW DO 

DISCOVER 
DISCOVERED 
RICA; AN 
AMERICAN 



WE 

WHO 

AME- 

ASIAN 

PERSP- 



ECTIVE ON THE 
HERITAGE OF 
AMERICA" 



July 15, Tue. 



July 22, Tue. 



"JEWS — OP- 

PRESSION— ANDTHE 
AMERICAN EXPE- 
RIENCE" 

Jan. E. Dizard, Professor of 
Sociology, Amherst College 

"THE NEW OLD-TIME 
RELIGION" 

Rev. Frank Dorman, United 
Christian Foundation, UMass 

"AN OVERVIEW OF 
THE LATIN-AMERI- 
CAN EXPERIENCE IN 
AMERICA" 



July 29, Tue. 



August 5. Tue. 



"NAT TURNER AND 
THE SOUTHAMPTON 
SLAVE REVOLT" 



"THE 
AND 



CONSTITUTION 
ALL THOSE 
OTHER DOCUMENTS" 



August 6. Wed. 



August 12. Tue. 



"A HISTORICAL 
PERSPECTIVE OF 
GAYS" 



"POST 
GIRLS 



CIVIL WAR 
AND THE 
AMERICAN NIGHT- 
MARE" 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



TELEPHONE 545 1982 





VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2 



AMHERST, MA. 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



The 

Hay Report 

administrative 
rearrangements?: 

pg2 



Campus 
Travel Inc. 

a new chapter 
to a continuing 
saga: pg 3 



JFK 

Memorial 
Library 

UMass Amherst 
site 

overlooked: pg 3 





a look at Puffers Pond: pg 12 






THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



The 

Hay Report: 



an "essentially administrative rearrangement" 
or a centralized system 
designed to take away 
from campus autonomy 



By Hillary Martick 

A controversial study of the administrative 
organization of UMass has sparked debate 
among some faculty, students, and ad- 
ministrators. 

UMass Present Robert C. Wood com- 
missioned Hay Associates of Boston, a 
consulting firm, to review the structure and 
workings of the President's Office and its 
administrative counterparts at the campus 
level. 

Wood wanted the Hay Report to complete 
two major tasks in its study: to examine the 
compensation schedules for UMass ad- 
ministrators and compare them with salaries 
of administrators at comparable institutions, 
and to evaluate the administrative func- 
tioning of the University as a whole in an 
outside, objective way. 

Confidential 

An aura of confidentiality surrounded the 
report's official release in March. Discussion 
and a more widespread release of the 
document has occured o»»V recently. 

Tho controversy stems not from the 
report's findings of the sate'y schedules, but 
from the ambiguity of the recommendations 
which urge the President's Office to assert a 
greater degree of control over certain areas 
of authority now held by the chancellors. 

One of the report's principle recom- 
mendations is that the President's Office 



should retain almost total responsibility for 
those University-wide systems which were 
designed to serve the needs of all three 
UMass campuses (Amherst, Boston, and 
Worcester). 

The Amherst campus presently maintains 
accountability for six University-wide 
systems in the following areas: accounting, 




"Policy initiative authority has always ' 
resided with the trustees and the 
President's Office" - Wood 



budget, computer center, management 
systems, personnel management, and 
publications. 



Under the current system, in operation 
since 1970, Chancellor Randolph W. 
Bromery determines the priorities for the use 
of these six systems and has the final day-to- 
day operational responsibility for them. If the 
report's recommendations are enacted, the 
President's Office will determine policies and 
priorities as well as assume full accountability 
for the systems' effectiveness, "ihe chan- 
cellor's responsibility as the chief campus 
administrator for the systems would be 
reduced to that of an operations supervisor. 

Under Pressure 

Bromery feels that Wood is under pressure 
from the Boston and Worcester campuses 
which are clamoring either for their fair share 
of the use of these University-wide services 
or for the development of their own com- 
puter, accounting systems, etc. 

He called complaints from the other two 
campuses about the Amherst campus' lack 
of equity in distributing the use of the 
systems "a misperception." "I think we (at 
Amherst) now have the capability to serve all 
three campuses but somehow we have to 
demonstrate that to Boston and Worcester," 
he said. 

Bromery continued, "It will cost a little 
more than we're spending now to reorganize 
the system. But it will cost us a lot less than 
having duplicate systems at all three cam- 
puses." 



Bromery said there will be no direct impact 
on students and faculty in the acedemic or 
governance areas but that they will share the 
benefits of "a more efficient system of 
management at less cost." 

Bromery, who agrees with the report in 
principle, said last week he hopes to work 
closely with President Wood and his staff 
over the summer in ironing out the details of 
an implementation plan. He said he plans to 
consult the faculty and will keep them in- 
formed about the progress of the plan. 

Stevenson W. Fletcher, 74-75 faculty 
delegate to the Board of Trustees, said, "If 
the Hay model is followed, I think it will 
seriously limit the ability of the chancellor to 
direct or lead the campus. It will make it more 
difficult for faculty to gain access or par- 
ticipate in the decision- making process at the 
level of the Trustees." 

According to Fletcher, two groups within 
the Faculty Senate are aware of the Hay 
Report and are trying to find out more about 
it. The Faculty Senate Program and Budget 
Council has requested a hearing on the 
implications of the report's recom- 
mendations with respect to their impact on 
the policy and procedures of the Council. 
The Senate Rules Committee has expressed 
concern as well. 

Fletcher said he is certain there will be an 
effort by some faculty members to get more 
input into the discussion of the report before 
it is enacted. 

Continued on page 14 



Unionization? 

Faculty moves toward collective bargaining 



By Berta Kundert 

Unionization has recently become an 
important issue to faculty members on 
campus and a drive for collective bargaining 
rights is currently being undertaken by both 
the MSP, (Massachusetts Society of 
Professors) and the Amherst Chapter of the 
AAUP, (American Association of University 
Professors). According to one UMass 
professor, "faculty members have little voice 
in matters which directly concern them. 

A major concern among organized faculty 
members is the possibility of the elimination 
of programs which would inevitably lead to 
lay-offs. Prof. Robert Dyer an MSP member, 
feels that "the loss of professors as well as 
the reduction of programs would greatly 
effect the quality of the institution." 

This spring, the MSP collected about 620 
Authorization and Designation cards (A&D 
cards) from faculty members in favor of a 
collective bargaining election. By June 17, 
the AAUP Chapter of the university had 
collected over 150 A&D cards, an amount 
well above the 10 per cent required to have 
its name added to the ballot. 

There will be three choices on the ballot, 
namely "MSP", "AAUP", and "no agent" 
for faculty altogether opposed to 
unionization. 



It is difficult to predict the outcome of the 
election, although President of the Amherst 
Chapter of the AAUP, Anthony M. 
Gawienowski is confidant about AAUP's 
chances. 

"It is an experienced organization which 
deals solely with problems of higher 
education and has publicized nationwide 
reports over the years", explained 
Gawienowski. 

Professor Robert Dyer sees the MSP's 
strength as being the active participation of 
its members. The MSP committee has met 
and will continue to meet on a regular basis 
to discuss issues pertaining to faculty 
unionization. 

From the administration point of view, 
Administration member Douglas Forsyth 
does not rule out the possibility of a faculty 
vote against collective bargaining. According 
to Forsyth, administration members have 
met among themselves to discuss the im- 
plications involved. 

At one June meeting, the discussion 
centered around the impact that collective 
bargaining might have on the university and 
the possibility of collective bargaining on the 
three main campuses. 

Continued on page 14 




Governor Michael S. Dukakis addressed a conference of educators in the Student 
Union Ballroom. Also shown is Secretary of Education Paul Parks. The conference 
was about Chapter 766. a new state law which requires that full educational servxes 
be given to handicapped children. Last Friday's conference was the first stop on an 
all day trip to Western Massachusetts for Governor Dukakis. 



xw€lt$ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



EDITORS 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

ADVERTISING 

CONTRIBUTORS 



Dan LaBonte, Debbie Schafer 

Ken Shapiro 

Alan Anastos, Gary Williams 



Hillary Martick, Berta Kundert, Richard Wright, 
Cliff Skibinsky, Mike Fay, Susan Genser, Aaron Huber, Rebecca 
Greenberg, Mike Kostek, Dave Sokol, Judith Wolinsky-Soloway, Jack 
Cahill, Tom Coffey, Zamir Nestelbaum, Arturo Brito, Rob Melacasa, 
Mike Moyle, Ed Cohen, Bill Howell, Kris Jackson, David Santos E.P. 
McQuaid, John Neister, Tyla Michelove. 

Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The staff is 

responsible for its content and no faculty member or administrator 

reads it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. Unsigned 

editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not necessarily 

eflect the views of the student body, faculty, or administration. Signed 

ditorials, columns, reviews, cartoons, and letters represent the per- 

>nal views of the authors. 

The office of the Massachusetts Summer Collegian is on the second 
floor of the Student Union on the campus of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 01002, telephone: S45 1982. 



Correction 

Due to a typographical error in 
the June 24 Summer Collegian, a 
quote from Campus Center 
Director John Corker was 
misleading. It appeared on page 3 
and should have read "I feel his 
(Stephano) intent was never to not 
pay the bill." The Summer 
Collegian regrets the error. 




I 
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Newsdealer & Stationer 
45 S. Pleasant St. 



Campus Travel, Inc. 

A new chapter to the Campus Center's 
continuing controversial saga? 



By Richard Wright 

Allegations of unethical and possibly illegal 
activity on the part of the manager of the 
Campus Travel Inc. here have sparked the 
latest in a continuing series of controversial 
events in the Campus Center. 

The head of the Civil Aeronautics Board 
(CAB) Bureau of Enforcement said last week 
that the simultaneous sale by a travel agent 
of a charter flight seat and solicitation of 
membership to an "affinity group" would be 
improper. 

An Amherst travel agency owner has 
charged in letters to the Civil Aeronautics 
Board that Stephen Lepow of Campus 
Travel has been telling prospective 
customers they can join the National 
Association of Students and Teachers 
(NAST) and subsequently become eligible 
for its many charter flights at greatly 
reduced cost over scheduled carriers. 

one in the same? 

These charter flights are offered through 
Vagabond Tours of New York City. 

Joseph Hamilton, Chief of Investigations 
and Audit of the CAB Bureau of En- 
forcement said last week that Vagabond 
Tours and NAST "may be one in the same". 

"We have notified all carriers of our 
concern about the operations of Vagabond 
Tours, NAST, and Campus Travel in the 
operations of charters", said Hamilton. 

Hamilton said it was CAB's belief at the 
time these carriers were notified that affinity 
charters were being sold to the general 
public. 

"In this case, students of a college are 
considered the general public", said 
Hamilton. 

This advisory by the CAB prompted 
Icelandic airlines to cancel several flights 
sponsored by NAST, according to recent 
press reports. 

Hearing requested 

NAST has requested a hearing for August 
at which time the "charter- worthiness" of 
their organization can be determined by the 
CAB, according to David Kols, of Vagabond 
Tours. 

Kols, who runs the million and a half dollar 
Vagabond Tours operation, said NAST had 
advised him they were conducting an in- 
ternal investigation and would have a report 
ready by the end of this week. Additionally, 
Kols said NAST was sending affidavits to 



people who had booked flights with them 
reiterating the CAB rules on eligibility and 
assuring customers who were found not 
eligible of full refunds. 

NAST spokespeople were unavailable for 
comment. 

6 month minimum 

According to CAB rules a person must be 
a member of a recognized affinity group for a 
minimum of six months before becoming 




"We're here to give a service to 
the college and we believe we have 
been doing that throughout." 

Stephen Lepow 

eligible for reduced fares on group sponsored 
charter flights. 

CAB's Hamilton said, "It's improper to 
solicit memberships for purposes of travel. 
They're not bona-fide members even if it's 
eight months or a year in advance, it would 
be improper," he said. 

John Wurster, co-owner and manager of 
the Adventura Travel agency of Amherst, 
has charged in letters sent to Campus Center 
officials and the CAB that people are being 
booked by Campus Travel on charter flights 
offered through NAST for its members and 
simultaneously being offered application 
forms for membership in the NAST. This in 



spite of the fact that CAB regulations state 
clearly that solicitation or application for 
membership to a. recognized affinity group 
for purposes of travel is illegal. 

Campus Travel Inc. has been operating in 
the Campus Center since February 1974 and 
is managed by Steve Lepow. His father, Mel 
Lepow, owns Central Travel of Springfield 
and is the actual holder of the lease for the 
Campus Travel office here. Mel Lepow has 
owned and operated Central Travel since 
1949. 

Never notified 

Steve Lepow said last week it was his 
understanding that "Our competition has 
done some wide spread letter writing to 
newspapers, regulatory agencies, and 
University administrators. We have not been 
copied in on any of this correspondent-3. Nor 
have we been contacted by, any regulatory 
agency, not even University administrators," 
he added. 

Dr. Robert W. Gage, vice-chancellor for 
student affairs said "We can't play the role of 
policeman", in referring to the charges 
against Campus Travel. "The proper 
recourse is the CAB", said Gage. 

"The Campus Center is a lessee" of the 
University said Gage. "We don't want to 
condone anything" said Gage, but the 
Campus Travel people are non-university 
personnel and it's "rather awkward" he 
added. 

In a May 17 letter to Bernard F. Wilkes, 
retail services manager of the Campus 
Center, Wurster of Adventura Travel states, 
"By allowing illegal charter flights to be sold 
through the Campus Center you are running 
the risk that people who purchase these 
flights will lose their money or be severely 
inconvenienced by last minute cancellations 
and delayed or partial refunds." 

Lepow said that Campus Travel has 
stopped selling tickets for seats on NAST 
charter flights. "We felt when this, whole 
thing broke open it was best to not sell 
tickets until we see what the outcome is." 

Hamilton, who is heading the CAB in- 
vestigation said last week that NAST at- 
torneys have contacted the CAB and said 
they are stopping their charters. Hamilton 
said "We are developing evidence 
everyday." 




"It is our belief that students are 
being sold flights that are illegal. 
Our position is that the University 
should take an active role in 
protecting the students". 

John Wurster 

The Collegian has learned that attorneys 
from the CAB Bureau of Enforcement have 
contacted students who have flown on 
NAST charters booked through Campus 
Travel. So far, the CAB has not contacted 
Campus Travel, Vagabond Tours, or 
University administrators. 

One student who was contacted by the 
CAB officials had done some volunteer work 
for the Campus Travel office including 
distributing 2,000 flyers to selected dorms. In 
each dorm, flyers were left in every other 
mailbox. 

The student said last week that a CAB 
official wanted to know how Campus Travel 
was depicting the charters to the students. 

The student also confirmed through 
personal experience the practice of applying 
for membership and booking a flight through 
NAST within the same month. 

Hamilton said that airlines have been sent 
an advisory of the CAB concern over the 
matter and that if information they have been 
gathering warrants it a further advisory 
would be sent to stating the seriousness of 
their concern. 

Wurster said last week "These flights are 
risky because of possible groundings by the 
CAB, It is our belief that students are being 
sold flights that are illegal. Our position is 
that the University should take an active role 
in protecting the students." 

Lepow said "We're here to give a service 
to the college and we believe we have been 
doing that throughout." 



Memorial 



UMass Amherst out of the running 



By Cliff Skibinsky 



UMass Amherst has lost in its bid to 
become the site of the John F. Kennedy 
library. The decision came last Monday at a 
meeting of the Library Corporation directors 
in New York. 

The directors put off a final decision on the- 
site until "sometime in the fall," according to 
Library Corporation Consultant Al Pierce. 
The remaining possible sites are the UMass 
Boston campus, and a split site offered by 
Harvard - the library archives in Cambridge, 
where President Kennedy wanted the library 
to be built, with the museum in Charlestown. 

A disappointed reaction came quickly from 
those involved in the campaign to bring the 
library to Amherst. UMass-Amherst 
Chancellor Randolph Bromery commented 
that he was disappointed that the Directors 
dropped the Amherst site without coming to 
a decision as to where the library would be 
built. "They really wanted to go to Boston," 
he said. 

Nan Robinson, Vice President for UMass 
Planning, stated that she felt the corporation 
"made a mistake in moving away from an 

Amherst site". She said the corporation 
should have dropped the Harvard site, and 
chosen between the two UMass sites. 



Consultant Pierce stated that there were 
two major reasons for dropping the Amherst 
site. While Amherst had many advantages 
such as low construction costs and high 
community enthusiasm, he said, it was not 
as "appropriate to Kennedy" as was Boston. 
He mentioned pressures from members of 
Kennedy's family to locate the library in 
Boston. 

Although Amherst has 
lost the benefits of the 
library 's "ph ysical presence " 
the educational benefits 
are not totally lost. 



The second reason was what Pierce called 
"the nature of the project". He stated that 
the money for the library project had been 

raised by "20 million individuals". Because 
so many individuals had made the library 
possible, said Pierce, the library should be 



visited by as large a number and as wide a 
variety of people as possible. 

He cited environmental impact statements 
which stated that only about 300,000 people 
would visit an Amherst library in a year, 
compared with about a million people in 
Boston. This factor, combined with the 
"appropriateness" question, served to 
eliminate Amherst from contention, said 
Pierce. 

In addition, Daniel Fenn, director of the 
JFK Library, said that Amherst was lacking in 
certain amenities, such as "transportation 
efficiency", i.e., airports, mass tran- 
sportation, etc., and hotels. Boston also had 
more in the way of "people resources", he 
said. 

Although Amherst has lost the benefits of t 
he "physical presence" of the library, Fenn 
said the edcational benefits are not totally 
lost. If the library is built at the UMass 
Boston campus, he said, there is likely to be a 

special relationship with the Amherst 
campus. This would come about because 
"we would be running into your people all 
the time in the cafeteria" at UMass Boston. 

Such contact could lead to programs such 
as students traveling from Amherst to 



Boston for research programs, collaboration 
between the Library and UMass Amherst on 
course materials, input from the Library on 

paper topics, special film programs brought 
to Amherst from the Library, and joint 
conferences between people at both 
campuses, using the resources of the 
Library, according to Penn. "We would work 
with all universities, especially with UMass 
Amherst," he said. 

Chancellor Bromery said that he noped the 
Library would be built in Boston because it 
would "spread the name" of UMass. In 
addition, interchange programs could be 
developed because Amheist has resources 
which Boston does not have, he said. 
As to the possibility of y UMass Boston s 
ite, Consultant Pierct? stated that there was 
no clean preference among the directors 
between the UMass Boston site and the split 
site offered by Harvard. Pierce cited the 
"symbolic value" of locating the library at a 
public university as one of UMass Boston's 

major advantages. However, according to 
Pierce, there were still many questions about 
the sites which have yet to be investigated. 
The unanswered questions lie behind the 
failure of the directors to make a final 
decision as to where the Library will be built, 
he said. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 197S 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WAAUA 



To air 
or not to air... 



By Mike Fay 



Once upon a time a young and very wise UMass 
student said, "The campus pond is so polluted it's a 
natural metaphor, for this University." 

It smells terrific, too; especially at the Fine Arts end 
of the body. 

Strange as it may sound to so,.e, radio station 
WMUA, the voice of UMass, is facing a fate as terrible 
as the campus pond. 

Budget bureaucracy may force WMUA to suspend 
broadcasting entirely this summer. Yesterday, salary 
fundin* - ran dry as a bone for WMUA. 

Emergency funding may become available to keep 
the award winning radio station on the air, but 
WMUA has been seeking funds, unsuccessfully, since 
early April. 



News Analysis 



».•.•.•.•.".•.•.•.'.•.•_•.•.•.'.•.•.•.•.• 



If the 1000 watt station continues broadcasting this 
summer, the people at WMUA will be living on water, 
toothpicks, ^nd napkins. Payless pay days are no fun. 

But the fnr -e did not look so bleak a few short 
weeks ago. \ ./UA was looking forward to a long 
summer. 

WMUA station manager, Marc Berman, received 
information on May 16 that salary funding in the 
amount of $4,200 would be allocated to WMUA for 
the summer. Berman said ho received a letter from 
James Riley of the Summer Activities Advisory 
Committee, (SAAC), guaranteeing explicitly $4,200 in 
summer funding. 

Berman said, "The letter said 'You (WMUA) will be 
allocated $4,200." But a number of University officials 
dispute Berman, particularly Allen Ashton. 

Allen Ashton is "in charge" of this University 
during the summer session, according to Mrs. Jane 
Bickford, who is Dr. William C. Venman's second 
secretary. Venman's position is unclear. In the local 
telephone book, under the University of Massachu- 
setts, he is listed simply as "Director." 

In any case, Ashton and Venman are employees of 
the Continuing Education Department, and Ashton 
says of Berman's funding claim, "It was not 
guaranteed." 

However, on May 27, three days beyond the end of 
the spring semester, when no one was around, 
Berman received yet another letter from Riley. This 
one said, "... WMUA will not be able to be funded as 
part of the Summer Activities Program of 1975. I 
apologize to you for indicating that there would be 
$4,200 available for a summer radio operation in my 
last letter." 

Riley said he made the revised funding decision 
using verbal information supplied by Allen Ashton. 

Bill Hasson, a fellow SAAC man, discussed 
WMUA's funding predicament as recently as June 12. 
Hasson said, "Did you ask (at WMUA) how many 
people would work for free." 

May 27 was also the day Hasson and Riley attended 
a closed door meeting with other SAAC members. 



This was the same day tne summer budget was 
finalized. It was also the same day Marc Berman got 
the bad news. 

Curiously enough, SAAC allocated $10,000 for 
"Music" programs this summer. And as Allen Ashton 
said, "$10,000 doesn't get you much music." 

Figuring from WMUA's original $4,200 allocation, 
with $10,000 WMUA could play music 48 hours a day, 
all summer long. 

But as James Riley noted in his second letter to 
Marc Berman, "The programs that will be supported 
with the money available are participatory in nature 
with the exception of one media outlet, that being the 
Collegian." Ashton also said radio was not par- 
ticipatory in nature. Evidently radio is not participatory 
in nature. But don't tell that to the Walton's. 

WMUA program manager Scott Bacherman, alsc 
ran into a bureaucratic snafu. Bacherman suggestec 
to Riley that WMUA put on a free concert, selling only 
beer to raise money for summer funding. But student 
government treasurer, Jack Margossian, found a by- 
law in WMUA's budget charter which vetoed 
Bacherman's plan, and Margossian duly notified the 
authorities, according to Riley. 

The by-law stated, "Binding: no monies for the 
summer program are obtained from other sources." 
So a free concert is out, and philanthropic donations 
will be returned. 

But Margossian didn't remember bringing this 
crucial by-law to the attention of SAAC. Asked if he 
discovered the law he said, "I might have. There's so 
many things to know. You don't know whether you 
said it or not." 

According to RSO Business Manager, Armand 
Demers, the man who has the final word on all 
summer programs is Director Venman. Venman 
confirmed this report last Wednesday stating, "That is 
correct." 

Concerning WMUA, Venman said in mid-May, 
"Goddamn it, they've done a good job. They've got to 
keep going." He was even more explicit. He said, "We 
certainly owe them support." 

Last Wednesday Venman described his position. 
He said, "I support the station and I'm going to be in a 
position to review their whole funding situation." 

However, Venman clearly indicated a personal 
involvement in the WMUA funding ' situation. 
Referring to WMUA funding Venman said, "I took 
myself off the committee, (SAAC)." He explained, "It 
was personal,'' but he did not elaborate. 

It is unclear if fellow SAAC members were in- 
fluenced by Director Venman's personal feelings, 
which remain a mystery today. 

Many officials, though, are quick to identify 
mitigating factors in the WMUA funding decision. 
First of all, summer session resources are scant this 
year because the fees are not rolling in. Students 
aren't registering in the numbers they did last year, 
according to Riley and Ashton. They must be working 
jobs, for pay, somewhere. 

Secondly, the Student Senate dropped the funding 
problem in SAAC's lap by failing to fund WMUA for a 
full year. Instead, WMUA is funded only for 44 weeks. 
With scant summer resources, Riley contends, 
traditional summer programs must come first. 

WMUA station manager, Marc Berman, disagrees. 
"You just don't let a 1000 watt radio station go off the 
air." 



* Poor 

* 



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WRITERS 



Long lines, red tape, and a hot humid day inside of Boyden gymnasium, 
registration day for UMass summer students. 



Of course it's 



ARE YOU A DISILLUSIONED NEWS, 
FEATURE, OR EDITORIAL WRITER? .... 
A DISPLACED COPY-EDITOR OR 
CARTOONIST? 

We are a group of commuter students at the 
University of Massachusetts seeking a viable 
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in the Amherst area. 

If you would like the experience of working on a 
monthly publication, without financial reward, 
come by room 218 Student Union Bldg. with a 
sample of your work, or call us at 545-2145. 




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CAMPUS CENTER 
UNIV. OF MASS. 

MON— FRI. 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 



Who Killed JFK? 



The A./. 6. fakes a Closer Look 



By E. Patrick McQuaid 
and Collegian Staff 



One of the less provocative slides 
shown to an audience of I 200 
last night in the Student Union 
Ballroom by the Assassination 
Information Bureau was that of the 
Warren Commission. However, this 
may soon prove to be the most 
disturbing of the numerous con- 
troversial photographs for seated in 
the far left corner of the picture is a 
man who upon conclusion of the 
Commission's findings contacted 
the publishing company of Simon 
& Schuster through whom he 
received an advance of $10,000 for 
his book-in-the-making, Portrait of 
an Assassin. That man later 
provided conflicting testimony 
concerning the use of "top secret" 
information that he had employed 
in the penning of his volume. That 
man was also the recipient of a 
$5,000 cheque from LIFE magazine 
for a cover story about the 
assassination. That man, at this 
time, is the president of the United 
States. Gerald Ford is the only 
living member of the Warren 
Commission still in political action. 

In a question-answer session, 
lasting over two hours following the 
initial film and lecture, it was 
suggested by a member of the 
audience that the AIB was in some 
way affiliated with the government, 
meaning of course, the CIA and-or 
the FBI. These allocations were 
denied. However, it is interesting to 
note that if the evidence turned 
over to the federal authorities and 
handled in the manner that is hoped 
for, the entire AIB crew would be 
out of a job. The same person then 
asked if Edward Kennedy was in 
any way behind the AIB operations 
as a political tool for the 1976 
presidential elections. 

"I don't know who's behind the 
Zapruder film. I can trace it back to 
a few sources," said the speaker. 
"But I know for sure that Kennedy, 
Ted Kennedy, did not provide the 
AIB with it. I really don't care who 
supplied it. I'm just glad that we 
have it." 

The new Amherst chapter of the 
A.I.B. is one of a growing network 
of national groups questioning the 
governments answers and evasions 
to questions about all political 
assassinations in this country. 
Known also as the Grassy Knoll 
Debating Society, the group has 



been active for over three years. 
The core group consists of Carl 
Oglesby, Bob Katz, Dave Williams, 
Harvey Yazijian (who was the 
speaker at the last presentation at 
UMass) and Michael Gee. 

The A.I.B. believes that domestic 
assassinations are part of a greater 
problem, that of a governing power 
that is no longer responsive to its 
constituency. As a solution they are 
encouraging political awareness at 
the community level. This 
presentation is one of many as the 
group has spoken at over 200 
colleges and in forty states. 

The Assassination Information 
Bureau has stated that its only 
means of income are the 
presentations given at various 
localities across New England 
similar to that of last night here at 
the UMass Amherst campus where 
a one dollar donation was 
requested. 

:S ■" •■:'■.. -■'-- -■■■■■■: mm :■:>■■ mmmmmm is; 

' We do not know 

who killed Kennedy. 

There are too many 

far reaching 

implications. We 
need a new 

investigation." 



S&SS3SSKSS55 



At present their aim is toward 
communication, though there is 
always room for those willing to do 
more research into the theories 
they currently espouse. The main 
goal is action, getting the com- 
munity to do more than wonder. 
"We do not know who killed 
Kennedy," Dave Williams said. 
"There are too many far reaching 
implications. We need a new in- 
vestigation." 

And so inquests are opened and 
reopened into a crime of some 
twelve years past; investigations 
are probing the innocence of one 
Dr. Mudd in the Lincoln 
assassination; of a certain calvary 
officer concerning the Custer 
massacre; and now we learn that 
George Washington, who was not 
paid for his commandership of the 



Continental Army was granted 
instead an unlimited expense 
account. He supposedly ran up a 
$50,000 bill for one weekend in 
Boston. All this is of paramount 
importance but meanwhile, what 
ever became of the violent furor to 
convict Richard Nixon? While we 
so avidly dig into the past, who is 
the next target of an assassin's 
"official" bullet? It's interesting to 
note that the Information Bureau's 
initials are identical to the American 
Institute of Banking while current 
investigations into CIA operations 
are under the authority of Nelson 
Rockefeller. ' How long, if not 
already, before CIA agents infiltrate 
such groups as the Information 
Bureau? 

What with all the CIA-paranoia 
running rampant, it is easy to 
understand how so many people, 
the vast majority being students, 
have followed the current trend of 
blame-it-on-the-CI A. The 
disclosures publicized by the 
Assassination Information Bureau 
are as convincing as those released 
by the Central Intelligence Agency 
themselves. So believable that one 
might be lead, with a little con- 
templation, to suggest that the AIB 
is an associate organization of the 
CIA. This is a mere speculation that 
I hold little faith in, yet with "In- 
telligence", "secret agent", and 
"spy" all household terminology, 
who are we to trust. Current events 
have shown us that we can no 
longer accredit our governments 
with the unfailing dependability 
that they have enjoyed for so long. 
Watergate mentality, con- 
sciousness, call it what you will has 
brought about a metamorphosis in 
American consciousness that has 
never been felt before and the 
tremors shall never cease. 

And do you recall back just after 
JFK's assassination, when we were 
all drawn away from the actual 
killing itself, and the papers were 
flooded with story after story of the 
amazing similarities between 
Kennedy's death and Abraham 
Lincoln's? They were cannonized to 
the American people and saintly 
Jack joined the ranks of Honest 
Abe. Who would dare suggest 
anything off the track? It wouldn't 
sell then, Theodore White hadn't 
yet taken to advertising, and it's a 
tough bullet to bite today. 

Even if a new inquest into the 
Kennedy assassination is un- 
dertaken, what guarantee is there 
that the truth will come out? 





An experience of music and dance last Thursday night introduced newcomers to the Amherst 
area to some of the finest music this valley has to offer. Opening the evening performance, 
bert and Sandra Gibson of "The Mad Gibsons" held the audience with some dance comedy. La 
ter in the evening a contemporary Black music ensemble consisting of Charles Greenlee on 
trombone Barry Harris on piano. John Betsch and Chris Henderson on percussion, Suheman 
Hakim on alto sax, Charles Allen on flugelhorn, and Ronnie Boykins as bassist provided the 
audience with some fine sounds. An afternoon open rehearsal included artists Archie Shepp on 
tenor sax and Allen Griggs on trumpet among the players, with Sonny Donaldson and Pnscilla 
Richshard i< the dance workshop. 



The Black Kettle Deli 

AMHERST — SUNDERLAND 
Pray St. Rtell6 

GREAT Food at the 
RIGHT Price! 

— It's a little bit of Sen York city 
ri^ht here in H ester n. Mass. 

Home Made Cheese Cake 



"Liverwurst Grinder' 
'Pepperoni Grinder 



/ 1 



99 



open 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. daily 



CVBAEfe 

HOUSE 



14 



CLOCHliK 
FOR 

men a 
warren 



*vM-> 



r^>r 




NEXT 

TbRCtfASE 
(with This ap) 



. . .pre -washed jeans 

white painter pants 

denim skirts 

work shirts 

farmer overalls 

levi corduroys 

...tops & bottoms 

for men & women 

AND 

western jeans 

jean jackets 

western shirts 

in denim & chambray 

...All the top brands 

at lowest prices. 



THE AREA'S LARGEST 

JEAIW8ST0RE 






201 n. pleasant st./amherst 
ft Fairfield Mal/chicopee 



"What's the Story? 



55 



r axw€lls 




Q: I have heard a rumor that Dr. Gage will be 
resigning sometime in the next few weeks. Can you 
tell me if this is true? J.A., Amherst 

A: Dr. Gaae admits he hat heard the rumor, but has 
no plans to resign in the foreseeable future. Gage has 
been at the university since 1960, and was appointed 
acting Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs in Oct. 1971, 
and fuH Vice Chancellor, his current position, in Oct. 
1972. 



Q: Can UMass students board horses at Tillson 
farm? I'm willing to pay for can and feeding, I just 
need a place to keep my horse. B.C., Northampton. 



A: Beth Donohue, Director of the equine division at 
Tillson, says no, boarding of student horses at Tillson 
is not allowed, due to lack of space. The farm, located 
off East Pleasant St., houses poultry and horses, and 
is used for research and riding classes. However, Ms. 
Donohue knows of other farms or places in the area 
where horses may be boarded, and she can be 
reached at 545-2373 for this information. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLE GIAN WEDNESDA Y, JULY 2, 1975 

I 
I 

digcdffieqUC & restaurant | 

BARBEQUE CHICKEN and SPARERIBS | 

$2.95 "SI *y 5:00-11:00 j 

At The Elmwood Rte. t Hadley 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Shop SOr the long Holiday Weekend-Closed Friday, Juty 4th~Cpen 



Q: I left the university dorm system this past May 
and will be living off-campus in the fall. I want to 
know when I will get my dorm deposit back, and if I 
will be receiving interest on it? Why does it take so 
long for the university to return deposits: L.S., North 
Amherst. 



A: According to Bruce Cochran of the Housing 
Office, dorm deposits will be returned by the middle to 
end of July. 

The delay is caused partly by "red tape and lack of 
staff," says Cochran, also because the bursar's office 
does not process any checks between June 13 and 
Jury 1, the end of the fiscal year. Students will not be 
receiving interest on deposits until it is decided if the 
university is in violation of a Consumer Protection 
Agency statute requiring 5 per cent interest to be paid 
on deposits, and the deposit refunded within 30 days. 
The lawsuit involving two students suing the 
university for failure to comply with the statute is still 
pending before the courts. If you have already notified 
the housing office of your departure from the 
residence hall system, and do not receive your refund 
by the end of July, call the housing office and let them 
know. 



Before you settle for less 
see 

Hadley Village Apts. 

Beautiful — Quiet — Spacious 

2-Bedroom townhouses 

3-room apartments 
Garden plots provided 

On Rte. 202 So. Hadley, Mass. 

1 mi. North of Rt. 33 

Tel. 1-532-9410 



Bus Schedule 



pull out and save 



Student Senate Transit Service 



FOR BIB INFORMATION CAJLL-.S4S-O0S6 or 545-2086 



Outbound 



SUrNER SERVICE EFFECTIVE MAY 27 to AUG. 29 
NO WEEKEND OR HOLIDAY SERVICE 



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ClStS. 

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CfM#t £.'•*-*_ 



rtedinoui 



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Jewelry Watches 

Fine China Silver 

Giftware 

Amherst, Mass. 
253-7615 



Fearing 
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UNIVERSITY OF PARIS - SORBONNE 
SUNY/New Paltz Philosophy Year 

Qualified undergraduates in philosophy and related majors 
can earn 30 to 32 credits; regular courses at Paris- Sorbonne 
( Paris- IV). The SUNY Program Director will help students 
secure housing, arrange programs and assist them in 
studies throughout the year. A four to five-week orientation 
and intensive language review will be held at the start. 
September 15 to June 15. Estimated living expenses, 
transportation, tuition and fees $3200 New York residents, 
$3700 out-of-state. 

For information, applications, write Professor Larry 
Holmes, Department of Philosophy, FT 1000, State 
University of New York, New Paltz, New York 12561. Tel. 
(914) 257-2696 



!■** lltl ?:•! Iiftl liM 

ll.lt 11 00 11:01 11:01 11:01 

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1,11 1 20 llll III 1:11 1:11 It* 

To Mayflower Apts. vii Colonial Village and Rolling Green 



To accomodate 7:45 aa Suaaner Session classes, buses will run 10 minutes earlier than tine shown for first inbound run only 
Effective June 24 to August IS only. 



Inbound 



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Lg. selection of 

Cut off denims 

only " 

•2« Old Weird 



Harold's 



USED JEANS 
Army Fatigues 

Used Leather 
Jackets 



Look for us at 65 University Drive 

Next to Bells and Hampshire Veternarian 

Open Daily 10-6 Friday eves till 9 



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With this coupon and a $5 purchase 

Stop <y Shop 

Coffee AO 

1 lb. can- regular ^^»^Pfc W 
drip or elect, perk ^BaW^^br 

245 1 
can per customer Good Mon . June 30- Sat . July 5 fcs 

,i >/ip/j>ifj/if)/mp/)/jf>!>/ <i i; il i,i i.iv i.i V 7 W »J/V VV W V ')>1 V'l *4ni 0} I 



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Afti'ii'.i'ii'iiii'.i'iiii'ii.i".,'ii',,i"i'i. ■■'!'' ...... .r. 

With this coupon and a S5 purchase 

a Hi-C Drink 

Assorted Fruit 0a\ md mS 

r$H A F J™ or ± Am r w 



i\AAi^r\AJ 



».*».»>.».< 




CttifV 



46 oz. can 



AAAAAAi'iTWiAAAiWiAi'iAiiAAAiiiilHirn^ 

With this coupon and a $5 

\n 

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244 t ! Limi one jar per customer 

Limit one can per customer Good Mon June 30 -Sat July 5 !■ : J J Good Mon June 30 -Sat . Joty 5 

^...y,...,, ,_,,,,,,,,,,,,,„.... i ■ ii.'iimniuuuiMMiiiu o^fff ■>! -^ > ?.".'VVV'.'V'.'7'.".".'VV'.".'VVVV'.'V'.'V'.'7WVW77V 



Mustard 



Stop&Shop 

9 oz. jar-regular 
or spicy brown 



With ihis coupon and a S5 purchase 



Sun Glory 
20 1b. bag 



242 1 



j \M* 



I 
I 
I 

I 

I 
Toddlers - 20 cl Day 
time 30 ct or overnight |. 
24 -count pKg i'.-_: I 

240 | r | 
Limit one bag per customer Good Mon June 30 -Sat July 5 



iV - ^ i -.r ^AnAiWiiiit^iWini'iMHi'iiti'iAAiVi'ii'iiii'i^^i^ArtniiAAnAaiViTanlltttl--.. 

With this coupon and a $5 purchase. 



■ v 7 vmm .. m .. ¥ .. n ....^ ,'»r.'S»W7"V«r\'WIW»«rWW'|^ 

)(||MH|lil/i':.,' 'in _ *^*L ZXatl — — - — — - 

*^l^ VI |i i, ^ 
\MAiVi'i/iAA/ii'iii*ii'iiil'ii , .i.i'ii'c a ^| t ~+A''''''' j|| 

w». ■« wai^ii . a. .a. - .. K w. ChSSC »C | i « y^ % "*«4l4. 

20ib. Briquets : «4 

. J49 | % 



Save 20 

Stop & Shop - Disposable 

Diapers 




Bounty.-^ 

Towels 3JJp ! 



120 count-2 ply roll 



Limit one pkg per customer Good Mon . June 30- Sat . July S. 



241 



53 LlmH one bag per customer Good Mon . June 30-Sat . July 5 I I 1 Limit one bag per customer cooa won June ju- aa. ju.y o ■ ■, "-""^>" " V—T 

^rfOOOOOOOOOOOOO 7 " **IL_ ~tj ..... -.---. Z44*— -la 

, "™"™ , ™'^^^^^^^^~"^^^^^™*^^'™^^"™^^ OOft»Oft«Oft«tOft«OftftO . . ISO ^ ^ (lOKlOOIITltXl W,|H 0"« K M PulChOM ^^_ 




All Coupono M(y B« RotlOtomox) V»,lh Ono tS 00 Puichaoo ^^ 

oS great meat values 

from Stop&Shop on youi 

taUe!J 




16 OX 

■ *' 
20 0/ 



| H 



" Of French bort* 
»6oi 



Get your Stop & Shops worth 
Underwood Spreads 

CncMn 4i. ox Deviled Ham 4*1 02 o> Corned 

Sun Giory Soda tf *^ t 
White Paper Plates 
Stop & Shop Pretzels 
Stop & Shop Relish 
Stop & Shop Ketchup 
Liq. Salad Dressing J** 1 
Stop & Shop Salad Oil 
Coronet Napkins 
Insulated Cups 
Stop & Shop Cold Cups 
Stop & Shop Aluminum Foil 
Vlasic Kosher Dill Spears 
Vlasic Kosher Dill Pickles 
Stuffed Spanish Olives °~- 
Friends Baked Pea Beans 
Dutch Maid Noodles b^o "•*,•. 
Hunts Tomato Paste 
Peanut Butter 
Stop & Shop Grape Jelly 



5^ 

I 4' 1 oz phg 

812 0.1 $•! 
cant I 

9rf> TQc 

100 cour<i I **7 

3o£M 



Hot Of COW 
51 ct pkg 



<Nci 
bag 

6*4 of 
cup* 

pkg 01 100 
7 02 cup* 

2SM 



7102 

can 
16 02 



Stop* Shop 
Crvamy or Chun* Style 



tfox 

m 
<• 01 



49° 
49= 
69= 
65 c 
45 e 
4^ 
79= 
29= 
69= 
69* 
49= 
59 s 
49= 
45= 
69= 
59= 



From Friday through Sunday, there will be a whole lot of eating going on 
cookouts, picnics, dinners, snacks. So Stop & Shop got together a whole lot 
of money-saving meat values for your weekend menus. There's delicious 
ham ... our naturally tender Great Beef and some fine Nepco values, too. 
Come and get em. And have a safe and happy "Fourth". 



Great freezer stocking values! 

ISEX Lemonade 

1 




Cool and 
refreshing. 



3 



12 oz 
cans 



39= 

79= 
$2»» 

99= 
'£,'99= 

10 0/ QQc 
p*g 057^ 

UJ 65= 

16 01 55c 



Tot 



40. 

I'll 



p*a 







,V" 



Stop & Shop Cheese Pizza IS 69= 
Shoestring Potatoes s "-» s ^ 3 2 £S »1 
Stop & Shop Onion Rings 
Taste O'Sea Fried Clams 
Carnation Salad Shrimp 
Jeno's Pizza Snack Tray 
Pound Cake cno»F„ioi*rt 
Stouffers Cup Cakes * F - 
Birds Eye Cool Whip 
Cal Treat Strawberries 

Merit- v 2 Gallon 

lice Cream 

Four Flavors J^fej#%C 
V2 Gallon Carton WU 
Delicious eatingl fj^F^^ 

Ice Cream Cups m.™*"! 'ytTi iTm m 
Hendrie's Popsicles 
Hendrie's Fudgesicles 

Sun Glory . m 

Orange Juice 

49 

Stay N' Shape Yogurt Bw - w - 3 SS 89= 
Breakstone Sour Cream '!£ 59= 
Cottage Cheese •• N Sha£ * W5 59= 
Kraft Amer. Slices ^"iK.'^S? 89= 
Philadelphia Cream Cheese m 45= 
Our own Stop & Shop 

Bread 



Wilson and other famous brands. 

Cooked Ham79 

• * Shank Portion wa. e r Added ^^ 

Rump Portion 
f Center Slices 




lb 



Wilson & other famous 
brands -Water Added 



Wilson & other famous 
brands-Water Added 



N^ 




Stop&Shop Great^Beef 



Tip Steak 

*Beef Round 

■Quality-Protected" Beet naturally aged for tenderness. 

Boneless Blade Steak Beef chuck 
Cube Steak- Beef Chuck 
Short Ribs- Beef Chuck 




"Quality- 
Protected" 



"Quality- 
Protected' 



$-,79 

$-189 

$ 1 



lb 

29 

lb 



3. 04 7 gc 



pug oil? 

27 01 

P»g olT 



79= 



Nepco 



Made with a little bit of love ... 
for whole lot of value." 



Corned BeeS s f 

Brisket - Double Cut J L 



29 



Bologna, P&P. Luxury, Olrve, 
Mock Chicken. Luncheon Loal 



Nepco Cold Cuts 
Smoked Pork Shoulder Roll 
Nepco Sliced Bacon 
3 lb. Nepco Canned Ham 



8 02 
pkg 



Nepco 
Water Added 



Great Eating. 



1 lb 
pkg 



Water Added 



Vfc gallon carton 

made from concentrate 




1 



Buttertop White Bread %* 2 SS 95= 
Buttermilk Bread s - 18 ~» 3££M 
English Mu.fins "«vo^ V 2«-.M 

Chedder che«s«, b*»3on, cinn. raisin or blueberry 

Countrystyle Donuts XT 2pi; w o?.M 
Maple Walnut Cake ■»*•• ^'89= 
Date Nut Bread »c,rtIr,i«Moi uoi i*g 69= 

tmm Po*(o uoi ecc 

oiUgM P>« "*J 

no. ggc 



Self Service Dell specials! Nepco Extra Mild Franks 
Nepco Sliced Bologna m $ 1 '• Nepco Knockwurst 
Nepco Beef Franks p4 '1 " Nepco Polish Style Sausage 



lb 

69 c 

$149 

d I «> 

$-159 
$479 

r4M t * 

po. I 
»1» 



Stop&Shop Hermits 
Stop & Shop Blueberry Pie 
dinner Rolls mmm Aift 2 



pig 

1IHOI 



89= 



mfZmnir** «H w owl 0010. 10 ovoo pocu«o> ol ony oom otcopi •**• 
otwwtw noon itimo o**«l *• ton n«o.ollO»01 01 coo» 
jiqJi 1 a aiholoooloro B«»»ni Piiw oHocoao 

• I I I • • • *«•••*•»■■ 



Wilson and other famous brands. 

Countrystyle Rite 

•Alb 

'ork Spare Ribs "•s^ M 5 ? 
Assorted Pork Chops 




Pork Loin 

Baste with your favorite sauce ... and 
barbecue for a delicious summer treat. 



Pork Loin- Wilson and 
other famous brands 



'"I 2 ? 



Great foods from our Service Dell. 

Available in stores featuring a service dek 




beginnings for a chefs salad! ' 

Imp. Danish Glazed Ham 
Potato Salad efZ&Z* 



srSiXSl'E& mm '~ Grapenut Custard 



79 



t 69= 

?r59= 



Nepco Cooked Salami 

Alport's Pastrami 

Old Fort Cheddar Cheese 



8 69» 

2 79* 
CM'* 



» • • • • ««..••*« 4 C I 



Fresh Southern 

Peaches 

33L 




sweet, juicy 
goodness 



Values from our own .K-.^ton! 

Mushroom Pizza 

Fresh- 16 ounce *«>9 

Real pizzeria flavor. ^^ 

Cooked Chickens 'TlSZXS? • 89= 
Gelatins- All Flavors «-»*-2^ 89= 
Ham & Cheese Sub Sandwich S 79= 
Cole Slaw V»1" 

Reel In all week savings 

Flounder Fillets 

Frozen s< fl09 



O 



Firm and flavorful 



T 



Snow Crabmeat 
Cooked Salad Shrimp 



81 *v 



let us do your 
photos! 

save you money on qualty 
to procewing. We do the 

iwork in our own lab ... give you 
bright, clear, borderless pic- 
tures on silk finish paper. We 
yell you how much develop- 
ing will cost when you leave 
your film. Bring in the coupon 
and save an extra dollar! 





Off 

j Hue film 
processing 

with this coupon on any L 
: roll or cartridge of Kodacokx 3>§ 
I C-110. C-126. 127, 620or 
." 35mm prints brought in to be 
: developed by July 12, 1975 

Limit one roll per customer 
Coupon expires Sat., .July 26 ^p 9 , 

Kodak Color Print Rim 99* 

Kodak 120-12 exposure rot 

Sytvania Flashcubes ^W 

Blue Oot-12 Perfect Shots 





Handpainted Stoneware 



I 



18.. 

<m% — » les—e I— - iwi >>gfc Jn w—n retw**— . — 
M mm ftjot at euH»t> o» «• n o rt i n our aMpaanki taomoa. 



for only 

with each $5 
purchase 



—— 



•*mp 



J 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WMUA 

Public Affairs 

Sunday: 1:30 p.m., Tout en 
Francais; 2:00 p.m. On 
Broadway; 6:00 p.m., Sunday 
News Collective. 

Monday: 6:15 p.m.. Off the 
Hook; 10:15 p.m.. Focus. 

Tuesday: 9:15 p.m.. Baseball 
Week in Review — Steve 
Berkowitz. 

Wednesday: 6:15 p.m. Off 
the Hook; 10:15 p.m.. Gaybreak 
(1st and 3rd); 10:15 p.m.. We 
the People (2nd and 4th). 

Thursday: 6:15 p.m., Off the 
Hook. 

News 
and 
Public Service 

High Tides, Monday-Friday, 
8:30 a.m. River Valley Almanac, 
Monday-Sat., 8:40 a.m. and 
5:30 p.m. National Weather 
Story, Monday-Friday, 6:30 
a.m. News, AM. 7, 7:30, 8, 8:30, 
9. PM, 12, 4, 6, 10 - Every Day. 



WFCR to air 

Tanglewood 

Concerts 

The sun, the stars, and the Boston Symphony Orchestra -Public Radio 
WFCR takes listeners to Tanglewood this summer, Friday and Saturday 
evenings at 8:30 and Sunday afternoons at 2:30. Beginning with the first 
concert July 4, WRCR brings its audience fine music played and sung by 
renowned artists from the unique outdoor setting of the Tanglewood 
music shed. The broadcasts are one of four new series startinq in Julv on 
WFCR. 

"Voices in the Wind", the ever-popular magazine of the arts, moves to 
6:30 p.m. every Sunday in July to present a special series of four programs 
selected by listeners as "best of the year". Each week on "Voices", artists 
join Oscar Brand for a lively discussion that ranges to all parts of the 
creative world, from classical opera to hard rock. 

Guests for the first feature broadcast are novelist Gore Vidal, Richard 
Bach, author of Jonathan Livingston Seagull, and the late Jacob 
Bronowski, who wrote The Ascent of Man and narrated the acclaimed 
television series. 

"European Concert Hall" takes listeners to the great stages of Europe 
for superior performances of inspiring orchestral and operatic works, each 
Monday at 8:30 p.m. Renowned performers form the orchestras and 
companies of Italy, Spain, and Germany offer a choice variety of com- 
positions that feature experimental and contemporary works. 

Today's musical scene is the focus for "Composers' Forum", when 
musicians present recordings of their compositions and discuss the 
creative process with host Martin Bookspan, Friday evenings at 11:00, 
following the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Tanglewood. 

WFCR 88.5 FM is a cooperative effort of Amherst, Smith, Mount 
Holyoke, and Hampshire Colleges, and the University of Mass. 



SUMMER WMUA PROGRAMMING S 


CHEDULE 




SUN. 


MON. 


TUE. 


WED. 


THU. 


FRI. 


SAT. 


6-10 
AM 


Classics 

Vivian 
Sandlund 


Wake-Up 

Marc 
Berman 


Wake-Up 

Marc 
Berman 


Wake-Up 

Marc 
Berman 


Wake-Up 

Marc 
Berman 


Wake- Up 

Rocket 
Rick 


Bill 
Nechamen 


10-2 
PM 


Classics 

John 
Dunne 


Cliff 
Brennan 


Mary 
Lawson 


Mary 
Lawson 


Rocket 
Rick 


Fran 
Dance 


Ragtime 
Duck 


2-6 
PM 


Country 

Mary 
Lawson 


Susan 
Schader 


Susan 
Schader 


Susan 
Schader 


Susan 
Schader 


Steve 
Berkowitz 


Louie 
Cronin 


6-10 
PM 


Jubilation 
Jazz 
Part 1 

Cliff 

Brennan 


Scott B. 


Scott B. 


Scott B. 


Ragtime 
Duck 


Tommy 
Joyner 


Cliff 
Brennan 


10-2 
PM 


Jubliiation 
Jazz 

Part 2 
Steve 

Berkowitz & 
Fran Dance 


Mark 
Nathanson 


Kandi . 

Bourne 
& 
Sandra 

Jackson 


Jose 
Tolson 


Universal 
Rhythms 

Sherwood 
Thompson 

&Rudv 

Jones 


Scott B. 


Jose 
Tolson 


2-6 
A M 




Sacred 
Cowboy 


Sacred 
Cowboy 


Sacred 
Cowboy 


Sacred 
Cowboy 


Sacred 
Cowboy 


Sabbath 




The Student Union Gallery opened last week with a sculpture 
exhibition by artist Howard McCallebb (lower right). This week 
the gallery will feature a group show entitled "Stories." 



e 

f 



z z a E x p r e 

formerly Domino's Pizza 

We've changed our name 
but not our pizza; 

AND NOW!! 



We Make Grinders 
for here or there. 

363 Main st. » Deliver* u ***** st. ££ 

l?!?™ 1 t LT* UenVer r N. Hampton f\ 

(12.00 minimum) 




256-8587 

r 

i 



COUPON 
Wed. only 

OFF 



586-2700 
COUPON 
Wed. only 









i 

j 25 c OFF 

jny^grinder J VL 



I 



Route 9, Hartley 

next to McDonalds 



i 




1.95-8.95 

(reg.S10.-15.) 



**--r iin'in 



mm 



What's Goto' On 



Bicentennial Lecturer 




JAN DIZARD 



"Jfews Oppression — and the American 
Experience," the third in a series of Bicen- 
tennial lectures, will be presented on July 8 
at 2:<K) p.m. in the Student Union Colonial 
Lounge 

Jar Dizard, chairman or the Department of 
Anthropology-Sociology at Amherst 
College, will discuss the social effects of 
Jewi$h immigration throughout American 

history. 

Dijjard will trace the roots of the growth of 
anti-Semitic sentiment during the nineteenth 
centgry and the resulting creation of a 
distinctive American Jewish community. 

Diiard believes knowledge of the 
Ameifcan Jewish experience and parallel 
experiences of other ethnic groups can lend 
a more realistic balance to the "naive 
celebrating" that typifies the Bicentennial 
years. 

Dizard has published articles and 
monographs on minority groups in America, 
the contemporary family and social change. 



*********** 



MUSIC 

Sheehan's Reel 



****** ***** 



Hornpipes, reels, a tin whistle and a 
hammered dulcimer will be a few of the 
features of the music hour at noon, Thurs- 
day, July 3 on the Campus Center Con 
course. 

"Sheehan's Reel," a group of five area 
musicians, will perform traditional Irish, 
Scottish, English and early American music. 
Combining history with music, the group will 
begin with a discussion and demonstration 
of traditional Irish music. They will follow the 

Farm 

Stephen Gaskin and the Farm Band win 
be holding a free Rock 'n' Roll meeting 
Sunday, July 6 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on 
Metawampe Lawn. 

Devoted to returning spiritual experience 
to the people. The Farm is a beatnik spiritual 
community of 800 people living on 1,700 



evolution of folk instruments and music from 
the British Isles to America; with sellctions 
typical of the periods. 

The group plays a wide selection of in- 
struments including wooden flute, dulcimer, 
mandolin, guitar, concertina, Irish hand drum 
and tin whistle. 

Toward the c'ose of the performance, 
eight dancers will demonstrate the traditional 
dances that developed during America's 
early years. 

Band 

acres of land in southern Tennessee. 

The Farm Band always plays for free. Their 

music is down-home, southern country 

boogie. The Farm Band will play throughout 

tne afternoon and Stephen Gaskin will talk 

and answer questions. 



SU Art Gallery 



Stories told on a wall, "found" stories, 
recorded stories or your story. 

"Stories" opens July 7 at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Student Union Gallery. 

Anyone who wants to tell, hear or see a 
story is welcome to attend the opening. 

Gallery Director Joe Kos sees opening 
night as, "A bunch of people in the gallery 



Stories will also be told on the gallery walls 
with words, paintings, drawings and colleges 
and will be played on audio and video 
recorders. 

"Stories", according to Kos, could turn 
into a multi-media bombardment. 

The show will run through July 11. For 
further information, call Janet Densmore at 
545-1902. 



65 UNIVERSITY DRIVE 




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Local 



MUSIC 



(July 2-8) 
Deadly Nightshade - Rusty Nail (Sunderland), July 9. 
Clean Uving - Shea's Grove (Chicopee), July 4, 5. 
Real Tears - Rusty Nail, July 4-6. 
Fat - 4 Leaf Window (New Salem), July 4-6. 
Widespread Depression - Lazy River (Northampton), July 3-6. 
Mitch Chakour & The Mission Band - 5th Alarm (Springfield) 
July 3-6. 

Fabulous Rhinestones - Shaboo Inn (Willimantic, CO, July 3-5 
(53). 

Fat - Shea's Grove, July 3. 

Some Of My Best Friends - Rusty Nail, July 2, 3. 

Clean Living - 4 Leaf Window, July 3. 

Little Fire Supermarket (Springfield), July 4. 5. 

First Annual Brattleboro Folk Festival - Chelsea House Cafe 
and Folklore Center (W. Brattleboro, Vt.), July 4, 5. 

Homecookin' - Steak Out (Amherst), July 2-5. 

Beverly Roh/ehr - Lazy River, July 2. 

Sunarc - Glen Lounge (Westfield), July 3-5. 

Doctors - Lazy River, July 8. 

True Ufe String Band - T.O.C. (UMass), July 3-5. 

Magic Music Band - Pub (Amherst), July 4, 5. 

Jokers Quicksilver (Amherst), July 4, 5. 

Bear Mountain Red Pantry ( Belchertown), July 4, 5. 

Bandersnatch Red Pantry, July 2. 

Marcus Gale Quicksilver, July 2, 3. 

Eros Lakeview Inn (Southwick), July 2-6. 

Warship Rusty Nail West (Westfield), July 2-6. 

Harpo & Friends Lakeview Inn, July 7, 8. 

Sourgrass Rusty Nail West, July 7, 8. 

D.J. Pub, Jury 3. 
Discos 

Maxwell's \Hadley] Open Nightly, Jazz Night on Sunday. 

Rachid's \Hadley\ Nightly until 1 a.m. 

Poor Richards III \Amherst) Open Nightly except Mon. - 
Featuring Fate on July 6. 

September's [Chicopee] Open Nightly. 



Concerts 

( T indicates tix available at Ticketron in CC Hotel Lobby] 

UMASS 

Paul Winter Consort - July 10, Campus Center Concourse at 
12 noon and Matawampe Lawn at 8p.m. [free]. 

SPRINGFIELD 

Professional Wrestling — July 5, Civic Center. 

Elvis Presley — July 14 & 15, Civic Center [sold out]. 

U.S. Accordion Championship Et Festival — July 9-11, Civic 
Center. 

The Osmonds — Aug. 7, Civic Center T. 

Miss World U.S.A. Pagent [with Bob Hope] - Aug. 17, Civic 
Center. 

LENOX, MASS. [MUSIC INN] 

Doc Watson - Emmylou Harris - Frosty Morn - Phil Ochs - Tracy 
Nelson — Jury 4, 2-7 p.m. T. 

Tom Rush & Orphan - Orleans - Leon Redbone - Wendy 
Wa/dman - Mimi Farina — July 5, 2-8 p.m. T. 

Two Generations Of Burbeck - Sky King — Jury 12, 5 p.m. T. 

Joan Beaz — July 19 T. 

Bruce Springsteen Ft The E Street Band — July 23 T. 

Bonnie Raitt — Aug. 9 T. 

Jerry Jeff Walker - Aug. 16 T. 

New Riders Of The Purple Sage - Aug. 30 T. 

Lenox, Mass. [ Tangiawood] — all shows T. 

Frankie Va/li - Four Seasons — July 8. 

Roberta Flack - Blood, Sweat & Tears — July 15. 

James Taylor - July 22. 

Judy Collins - July 29. 

Linda Ronstadt - Aug. 26. 

Helen Reddy - Aug. 30. 

CAPE COD COLISSEUM [HYANN/S, MASS.] 
Chubby Checker - Rock Festival - July 12 T. 
Three Dog Night - July 19 T. 



All events sponsored by Summer Activities are free 
to UMass summer students and fee paying conference 
participants. The general public will be admitted as 
space permits. 



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SODA CITY 



Films 

this week 



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At The Arco 

Station Next To 

Campus Plaza 

256-0107 



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telling stories.. .any kind of story 
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f BELL'S PIZZA HOUSE f r 



"MANDABI" by Ousmane Sembene Wednesday July 2 8:00p.m. 
CC Auditorium 

This film unlocks for the first time the world of modern Africa 
a civilization struggling to recapture its own rich heritage after it 
century of colonial tutelage and corruption. A story of classic 
simplicity about a man who receives a money order, tells how this 
dubious windfall threatens to destroy the traditional fabric of h 
life:90 minutes. 

"THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS" with Jack Nicholson 
Wednesday July 9 8:00 p.m. S.U.B. 

The story of a wheeler-dealer in real estate — involved in a 
quick "get rich" scheme that takes us on a zany chase through the 
Boardwalks of Atlantic City. 103 minutes 



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10 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JLH_Y 2, 1975 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



P 



Bits 



CEE Recruits 



The Center for Experiential 
Education is presently recruiting 
students from the University of 
Massachusetts and the five college 
community for pre-professional 
internships to begin this summer. 
These internships are for a full year, 
however there are a limited number 
of internships available for the 
Summer and FaJI terms. Students 
will earn academic credit and a 
weekly living allowance while in- 
terning. 

Minority students are urged to 
apply. 

If you are seeking a new learning 
experience act immediately. Some 
internships have already begun. 

For more information call Larry at 
545-1381. 

Puberty doll 

The folks at Mattel Toys, who 
produce the Barbie Doll, have really 
outdone themselves with the lates 
version. The new Barbie is capable 
of growing from a little girl into 
puberty right before your very eyes. 
With a simple twist of one arm, the 
little girl doll grows taller, slimmer in 
the waist, and develops two 
budding breasts. Naturally, she 
comes with two different 
costumes. 



Women's Caucus 



The University Women's Caucus, 
a University wide support and 
advocacy group formed in February 
of 1975, will be continuing its work 
throughout the summer. The 
Caucus has been focusing on such 
issues as Child Care, Affirmative 
Action, and Women's Athletics. 
The Caucus recognizes that there 
are many other areas in the 
University in which the needs of 
women are not being met, and 
would like to hear from University 
women (student, staff and faculty) 
about their concerns. 

Since few people are around this 
summer, a general meeting of the 
Caucus won't be held until Sep- 
tember. However, the steering 
committee will be meeting weekly 
throughout the summer to continue 
the work begun in the spring and to 
take action on issues which arise. 

Women who wish to express 
their concerns to, or become in- 
volved with the Caucus should 
contact Sherry Flashman or Susan 
Weinberg at 545-0812 or 545-0800. 

Peeping Priest 

STEYNING, England 1 % Police 
here were called to investigate a 
complaint at a public restroom 
recently, only to find a Catholic 
priest kneeling in the men's room. 
But the good father wasn't at his 
prayers. Instead, he was chipping 
away with a chisel and hammer at 
the wall dividing the men's room 
from the women's room. Father 
Bob Champain told the officers 
he'd just bought the tools and 
couldn't wait until he got home to 
try them out. 

SBA MS s up 



Applications for admission to the 
UMass School of Business Ad- 
ministration master's degree 
programs have increased 40 per 
cent over last year. 

According to a report by Dean 
George S. Odiorne, there were 702 
applications for fall admission to 
master of business administration 
and master of science programs by 
June 1. This compares to slightly 



less than 500 applications a year 
ago. 

The UMass experience compares 
to a national average applications 
increase of about 22 per cent. A rise 
in the qualifications of those 
competing for admissions has 
accompanied the increase. The 
average grade point average for 
applicants last year was 2.8 on a 4- 
point scale. This year the average 
has risen to 3.0. There has also 
been a leap of 40 percentage points 
in scores on business aptitude tests 
administered applicants by the 
Educational Testing Service. 

Dean Odiorne said the rise in 
applications is due to a 
corresponding rise in college 
graduates' desire for professional 
education, the success in finding 
jobs by those with master's 
degrees, and the increased visibility 
of the UMass business school for 
career development education for 
talented students. 



Craft Shop 

Bowls, belts and jewelry are a 
few of the things you can make this 
summer at the Craft Shop in the 
lower level of Student Union. 

Open Monday through Friday 
from noon to 6:00 p.m., the Cnft 
Shop will offer tools and facilities 
for working with leather, silver, 
ceramics and photo developing. 

The Craft Shop will supply, at 
low cost, leather, silver and pottery 
supplies. Anyone interested in 
using the darkroom should bring 
their own developing paper and 
supplies. 

Woodworking, on a limited basis, 
will also be available. The Craft 
Shop has a wood lathe, band saw, 
drill press and hand tools. Anyone 
interested in wood projects should 
bring their own raw materials. 

Marion Abrams and "Bear"' 
Acker, the summer Craft Shop 



Writing in Psychology Today, Dr. 
Arnold Mandell, an acknowledged 
expert on drug abuse in 
professional sports, claims that on 
any given Sunday, as many as half 
of the professional football players 
may be using some sort of 
stimulant. 

Summer Jocks 

The Summer Intramural Program 
is offering a number of team and 
individaul sports competitions this 
summer. Softball, volleyball and 
tennis are but three of the popular 
activities. Entries for teams and 
individuals can be delivered to the 
IM office until Thursday, July 3. 
Why not enter a team? For in- 
formation, call 5-2801 or 5-2693. 




CJt\ worth of bicycle 
9*U accessories 
with the purchase 

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GRAND PRIX 




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nationally known brands 

of quality accessories 



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CYCLE SHOP 

253 Triangle St. 

Amherst, Ma 01002 

413-549-3729 



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HOUSING 

STUDENTS 

RENTAL AGENTS/PROPERTY OWNERS 



If you are a student looking for housing or if you are a rental agent 
with a large number of units or if you are a small property owner 
and are seeking tenants for a spare room or upstairs apartment, 
use our services; they are free. 

We have established a new computer based housing referral 
system in Amherst which serves the Pioneer Valley. We are not a 
rental agent but simply a service facility seeking to bring people 
and housing together in the most efficacious manner possible. 

Contact : 

Off- Campus Housing Office 
UMass-Amherst 01002 
3 Munson Hall 
Phone 413-545-0865 



A finely crafted piece of sterling is being sanded at the Craft 
Shop in the lower level of the Student Union. 



CAL Workshop 

Community arts leadership (CAL) 
is the subject of a workshop 
designed to provide participants 
with the skills and specific 
knowledge needed to start or 
strengthen a community arts 
organization or council. This week- 
long intensive workshop is offered 
by the Arts Extension Service of the 
Division of Continuing Education at 
UMass, Aug. 4-8. 

Subjects to be covered in the 
CAL workshop include: 

organizational structure and 
management, arts services for 
community institutions, publicity 
and public relations, long-range 
planning, arts festival planning, 
budgets, arts and artists in the 
schools, and a series of sessions 
devoted to leadership training. 

Past workshops have given 
encouragement and support to 
people from surrounding areas who 
have initiated and improved arts 
councils and arts-related programs 
in their own communities. The 
present workshop has been 
designed to give each participant 
an intensified look at how the arts 
can develop existing community 
resources and potentials. 

On Aug. 2 and 3 the Arts Ex- 
tension Service is offering a tour for 
all workshop participants. The tour 
will include a visit to Jacob's pillow, 
the nationally-known dance center 
featuring professional artists 
performing bailet, modern and 
ethnic dance; a performance at the 
Williamstown Theatre, a nationally 
acclaimed theatre with 

professionals from Broadway and 
Hollywood appearing in plays and 
musicals, and a Sunday afternoon 
concert in the Berkshire Mountain 
setting of Tanglewood. 

For a brochure write: CAL 
Workshops, P.O. Box 835, 
Amherst, Mass., 01002, or stop by 
the Arts Extension Office located at 
Draper Annex on the UMass 
campus, telephone (413) 546-2013. 



staff, will be giving seminars in 
ceramics and jewelry. The seminars 
are tentatively planned for Monday 
and Wednesday afternoons. 

In its fourth year of operation, the 
Craft Shop attracts a large daily 
volume of people interested in 
making quality and personalized 
products by hand. During the 
regular school year, the Craft Shop 
offers seminars on a variety of 
subjects including ceramics, 
stained glass, silk screen printing, 
batik and stone cutting and 
polishing. 

For further details on summer 
seminars or the crafts program, 
drop and see Bear or Marion. They 
will be keeping the Shop open from 
now until August 13. 

NFL drug use up 

The former psychiatrist - in - 
residence with the San Diego 
Chargers football team says that 
drug abuse in the National Football 
League is as bad, if not worse, than 
before the league cracked down on 
drugs in 1974. 



FENTOIM'S 
ATHLETIC 
SUPPLIES 



Wholesale & Retail 



OPEN 




377 Main St. 
Amherst 

ANNOUNCES 



New Summer Hours 




10:00-5:30 MON.-FRI. 
9:00-1:00 SAT. 

CLOSED JULY 
4th & 5th 



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Now open for vour inspection are Hit WDYWINK'S 
beautiful new one and two bedroom model apart 
mints 

I omrnvi-r for a visit any day of the week 
In a few minutes we'll show you all the reasons in the 
world why Kit AMIVHIM. is a better plate to live Wr 
invite you to compare features and compare prices. 





BRANDYWINE 

at Amherst 

One and two bedroom units from $220.00 



ConnmincM which make BRANDYWINE 
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Central Air Conditioning 

An abundance of cloeet apace 

Eatre aecuritT leeturee Including Intercom 
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large. partlevMe ancioaed private petloe and 
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luaurioue well in well carpeting 

Beeutlful new awlmming pool end 
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Beeutlful well kept orounde. highlighted by 
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I aa UMm Bua Service 

Laundry facllitlee wall loceted 

Sefe plevground for children 

Rental furniture evallable from Putnam 
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Five states 

decriminalize 
marijuana 

The California Legislature has 
given final approval to a measure 
which would end the arrest and 
jailing of persons charged with 
possession of small amounts of 
marijuana. The bill (S.B. 95) is 
expected to be signed into law by 
Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr., 
making California the fifth state to 
adopt the citation approach for 
marijuana use. 

Alaska, Maine and Colorado have 
enacted similar legislation in the last 
six weeks, all modeled after the 
successful civil fine law which has 
been in effect in Oregon since 1973. 
The legislation, sponsored by 
Senate Majority Leader George R. 
Moscone (Dem.-San Francisco), 
and Assemblyman Alan Sieroty 
(Dem.-Los Angeles), calls for a fine 
not to exceed $100 for possessing 
up to one ounce of marijuana. 
Enforcement would be like a traffic 
violation, with a citation instead of 
an arrest. Misdemeanor penalties 
would apply to possession of more 
than one ounce. 

The Assembly passed the bill 
Tuesday, 42 to 34, in an emotional 
and partisan atmosphere that saw 
the Republican caucus adopt a 
binding unit rule position against 
the bill. No Republican voted for 
the bill on the floor of the 
Assembly, with all 42 affirmative 
votes from Democrats. 

Tuesday's action reversed an 
earlier Assembly vote that refused 
passage of the bill on a 37 to 36 
vote, four votes shy of the 41 
required for passage. 

The State Senate, which first 
approved the measure in a 
bipartisan vote last March, ap- 
proved minor Assembly amend- 
ments to the bill Thursday and sent 
the bill on to the Governor. 

Governor Brown, who supported 
the Oregon law in his campaign last 
fall, now has 12 days to act on the 
measure. 

Gordon Borwnell, West Coast 
Coordinator of NORML, called 
upon Governor Brown to sign the 
bill and "bring to a close 60 years of 
treating marijuana possession as a 
felony." Brownell also cited a 
recent state-wide Field Poll, 
commissioned by the independent 
Drug Abuse Council, that found 
three out of ten California adults 
have now tried marijuana, including 
54 per cent of all 18-29 year olds. 
After it is signed, the new 
marijuana law will take effect in 
California on January 1, 1976. 

Outing club 

The UMass Outing Club will 
continue offering evening and 
some weekend trips throughout the 
summer. 

Evening trips are held every 
Tuesday and Thursday and include 
canoeing and hiking. Every 
Wednesday night the Club holds a 
softball game in the fields across 
from Boyden. 



Although the schedule for 
weekend trips has not been worked 
out yet, the Club intends to hold 
trips during July and August. They 
will include caving, hiking, 
canoeing and rock climbing. 

The only costs involved in Outing 
Club activities are for gas and, if 
necessary, food. 

Anyone interested in outdoor 
activates should check the Outing 
Club bulletin board, located beside 
the Student Union Ballroom, 
regularly. The board has in- 
formation on upcoming trips, sign- 
up sheets and detail on skills or 
equipment needed. 

MFA 
"record"' awards 

Record publishing achievements 
at the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) 
Program in English of the University 
of Massachusetts have been set by 



Far Outer Space 



-- A 

scientist with the U.S. satellite 
program is using a powerful 
telescope mounted on the satellite 
Copernicus to search for laser 
signals from intelligent beings in 
other solar systems. 

Herbert Wisch'nia is already 
analyzing data gathered by the 
satellite while the telescope - 
designed at Princeton University - 
was trained on the star Epsilon 
Eridani, 64-mil!ion miles from earth. 
During the summer and fall, the 
telescope will attempt to pick up 
possible laser signals from two 
other stars on equal distance from 
earth. 

Wischnia won't speculate on the 
chances of actually picking up 
signals from other planets. In fact, 
he confesses that there isn't even 
any assurance that the target stars, 




A young lad gets his rocks off while going off the rocks at 
Puffers Pond. 



Brandywine Dri 

Amherst 
549-0600 



TOWNEHOUSE 

of Amherst 

Two and thiee bedroom townhouses, with wall-to-wall carpets, 1-1/2 baths, 
dishwasher, garbage disposal, self-cleaning oven. FROM $225. 

Pool and recreational facilities, safe playground for children, FREE UMass 
Bus service. 

Open for your inspection 7 days a week. 

50 Meadow St., Amherst, Mass. 549-0600 



a novice and three veteran writers 
here. 

The "record" includes a first 
short story in a national magazine 
by anewcomer to the program and 
three new books accepted for 
publication in 1976. 

The novice is Catherine Hosmer, 
a first-year MFA candidate from 
Keene, N.H. Her short story ap- 
pears in the May issue of Redbook 
Magazine. Titled "The Glass Shell," 
the piece of fiction is written under 
her maiden name of Catherine Ann 
Fought. 

Another story, "The Place- 
Kicking Specialist," by Prof. Jay 
Neugeboren, appears in the special 
fiftieth issue of the Transatlantic 
Review. A member of the MFA 
faculty, Neugeboren is also 
Resident Writer at UMass. 

Gold rush bust 

The great gold rush -of 1975 
appears to have been more like a 
rush away from gold than a rush to 
acquire it. Since possession of gold 
became legal in January - for the 
first time in 41 years - gold sales 
have actually dropped about 20 
percent, according to the Treasury 
Department. 

Most financial analysts agree that 
the high price of gold, combined 
with the recession, has served to 
keep most Americans away from 
the glittery market. 



believed to be suns, have any 
planets orbiting about them. 



The 
search 



is on 

A committee has convened tc 
begin the search for a new dean o1 
the College of Food and Natura 
Resources at the University of 
Massachusetts-Amherst. 

Named to the committee b\ 
Chancellor Randolph W. Bromer, 
were: John Foster of Food anc 
Resource Economics, chairman 
William Bramlage of Plant and Soi 
Sciences; nathan Chandler; Fergus 
Clydesdale of Food Science ant 
Nutrition; -Richard Damon o 
Veterinary and Animal Sciences 
and Curtis LaPierre, a Stockbridg 
Agricultural student; also- 

Walter Melnick of th 
Cooperative Extension Service 
Aurelia Miller of Home Economic? 
John Noyes of Forestry an 
Wildlife Management; Marti 
Sevoian of Veterinary and Anim. 
Sciences, and Carl Swanson of th 
botany department. A graduate an 
undergraduate student will also s 
on the panel. 

Dean Arless A. Spielman earli< 
aanounced he will step down ne 
year. 



i i 



|/.|r >. I II >• 



I 



12 



THE MA^ArmiSFTTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



The Ole Swimmin' Hole 



By Aaron Huber 

Looking for a swimming hole in 
the Amherst area to escape a 
summer's day heat is not always 
easy. The first place that always 
comes to mind is the swimming 
hole of .younger days. Swimming 
was much more fun then, because 
it was expressly forbidden. The 
element of thrill added to the fun: 
there was always a large rock high 
above the water, or a threadbare 
rope hanging from a tree. The air 
was filled with calls for to see which 
person would go the farthest. 
Nearby was a piece for persons 
timid enough to be called 
"chicken" to wade in. 

Located in North Amherst, 
Puffer's Pond has all the makings of 
that old swimming hole. A large 
rock formation on the northwest 
side of the pond is nature's answer 
to the high dive. On a busy day 
swimmers wait in line while those 
ahead of them drum up enough 
courage to make a daring leap over 
the rocks into the water. For those 
less daring, on the southeast side of 
the pond is an area for picnickers 
and sunbathers. 

Officially named Factory Hollow 
pond, but commonly known as 
Puffer's, the pond is controlled by 
the Amherst Conservation Com- 
mission. It's a place where many 
swimming hole enthusiasts in the 
area go on a good swimming day. 

"Swimming is legally prohibited" 

at Puffer's Pond, according to 
Conservation Utticer Kete 
Westover. "Amherst is not liable 
for accidents there while swim- 
ming," he said. 

The town is considering whether 
or not to turn it legally into a 





LANDRY'S MARKET 



A Waterfall buff bares it all as he cools off beneath the falls at 
Puffer's Pond. 



swimming area. Right now it would 
be too expensive, Westover said. 
They could get a life guard, he said, 
but then it probably wouldn't be as 
fun or as popular as swimming 
illegally. 

During the hot weather in May 
there were minor complaints to the 



Conservation Commission and 
Police Department from residents 
near the pond about trespassing 
and vandalism. It was felt these 
complaints were due to UMass 
students in town during extremely 
hot weather, increasing the amount 
of swimmers. Westover said. 



The Oldest Grocery 


in Amherst 


Michelobe — 12 oz. Nr — 6.50 case 


1.69 six pack 


Munich — 12 oz. NR — 4.25 case 


1.09 six pack 


Balentine Ale— 12 oz. NR — 5.55 case 


1.39 six pack 


Heineken — 12 oz. Nr — 14.95 case 


3.75 six pack 


Schaef er — 12 oz. cans — 5.50 case 


1.39 six pack 


Ice 


50c for eleven pound bag 


Pure Hardwood Charcole — 1.29 


18 lb. bag i 


Fresh ground beef 


79c lb. 


Tenderloin Steak 


2.591b. 


(Fillet Mignion) 




First Prize Franks 


31b. family pack 3.99 


Kayem Franks (Skinless) — 1.29 for lb.— 


7 lb. box 8.35 


Check our other low steak 


& meat prices 


Balogna 




Veal Loaf 


all only $1.09 lb. 


P & P Loaf 


- 


Idelnot farm fresh milk 


1.43 gal. 


' Cabots triple score butter 


89c lb. 


Vermont chedder cheese 


1.49 lb. 


Sweet Red plums 


59c lb. 


California bing cherries 


69c lb. 


New seedless grapes 


79c lb. 


Iceburg lettuce 3 heads 


87c 


711 Main St. Amherst 253-5387 1 


On the Belchertown Bus Route 



| campus carousel ] 



By Tony Granite 
SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE at 
USoFIa was curtailed in June 
because of lack of riders, according 
to the Oracle, there. 

When the University invested 
$18,000 to keep the bus in 
operation for 60 days, it anticipated 
an averaged of 1,000 roders a day. 
The most they could attract was 
306. 

Its undoing was possibly the 10- 
cent fare. 

■f ♦ ♦ 
BEER BUST? There's a psych prof 
at UWis-Stevens Point who 
collects beer cans as a hobby. 

A member of Beer Can Collectors 
of America, the prof exhibits 800 in 
his basement. His collection awaits 
a pornographic beer can reportedly 
appearing in Denmark, according to 
The Pointer. 

+ + + 
EDITOR WANTED ADS IN The 
Denver Clarion drew only one 
applicant. And he was rejected by 
the student communications board. 

When Maurice Mitchell applied, 
he had the experience - he used to 
run weekly newspapers in Upstate 



New York. But he was not qualified 
because he was not a student. He is 
the Chancellor of the University of 
Denver. 

But the publicity surrounding his 
willingness to serve did result in 
filling the position. Four applicants 
came forth, and one was chosen. 

+ + + 
HAPPINESS AT I.U. is the 
operating budget finding approval 
in the legislative mainstream. The 
more than $61,000,000 proposal 
includes a prohibition against fee 
increases. The amount is 15.48 per 
cent more than the Legislature 
allowed in 1364-65. 



■" *AT THE*G ATES 
OF SMITH COLLEGE 



CbMUSIC 




CkupdA- 



FOR SALE 

Cassette tapes. 
6702. 



Big selection 549 
tf7-9 



Huge wood desk, (approx. 3x6 ft. 
surface); cheap stereo system; 
comfortable reclining chair; tape 
recorder. Moving to the big apple 
and leaving it all behind. Call Jerry 
anytime at 263-9869. 

tf 



INSTRUCTIONS 

Recorder instruction: I will help 
you develop your playing for 
greater enjoyment. Beginners 
welcome. Stuart 266-8098. 

7-2 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

Responsible, neat, quiet person 
for own room in Riverglade 266- 
8016. 

7-2,9 



Kenwood 7002 Amp. 100 wrms; 
with Marantz clinic report. Exc. 
cond. 666-4244. 

7-2 

CALCULATOR 

Calculator HP 21 all standard 
access Ories including warranty. 
Recent gift. Never used $86. Mark 
263 7788. 

7-2 

WANTED 

3 speed girl's bike wanted. 26 in. 
wheels. 20 in. frame or there about. 
253 9869 

7-2 



SUBLET 

Roommate wanted to share rent. 
2 bedrm apt Sunderland, on bus 
route. Call Don or Al after 6 00 p.m. 
665 2811. 

tf7-9 

SERVICES 

College student seeks painting in 
Amherst area. 4 years exp. Free 
estimates. Dave 649-3832. 

7-2 

Do you need any odd jobs done 
around the house? Heavy labor is 
my specialtyl Lifting, mowing, 
gardening, painting, you name it. 
Call anytime, 549-3626 and 
message for Ed Colby. 






WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



THE WIZARD OF ID 



15 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



cz? You &&uzve in Tne &bp\&atioh 



f woulp You 3E5 vViuuin^ -re ^ 

■&W&A1Z T& 7H4T &H T\\& 3IPL-E 
IN A Ct?UPT &F UAW? 



by Brant parker and Johnny hart 




B.C. 



by johnny hart 



rr 



MAY ibUK. NV^TKe^S Pie. ANP 
LEAVE ALL HEk? WORLDLY" 
&eLON6>IM<b^ T& >&UR WIFE. 

y 








my \dur eesr friend hire 12 

LAU<&HIM6> HYENAS AS (v\OURMER^ 
AT" YfcUR WAKE. 



FEIFFER 




V0UUX5H A 
JOB AT STATE? 
WST WOUR 
bukUFlCA- 
Tla)S / 



iU W4 I M&&/ 
A6AIUST OUR 
RUAJ0CII0O FRO)CH 



G9UXJIAUSM 
IUR>CHI|UA 



IK) 



iKJ KU2 I PR5CICWP THAT 
C0MMITTlUJ> OS AQVISORS 
TO 60JTrl WETUAM uOOUU? 
LCAP TO AM AMEOCAU 
WAR. v 



ik) 1^5 1 VbWuVCtP 
THE 60HB/IU6 OF WORTH 
VIETNAM AS GJMTZ&- 
PBXUCTcVc" 




.s~€5\ 



ID WO I PRDT55TEP THAT 
IWVAP/06 GAMBOP/A COUU? 
OWV lEAP TO P/6ASTFR 

\ 



im <50fcEV va> 

APE M JT 
3UU£6P FOR 
THE STATE" V6PT. 




,tt.i"T>N , 




7-i 



3etu fcksrtT 
S!Ul£ R^t! 



RiOtf AW WPOU6 
IS R0R HISTORIANS 

woo vo wot nr iu 

WITH THE TeAM 





^Ch 





Kris Jackson 




"view 

Your Stars This 



By Stella Wilder 



A tendency to be preoccupied 
with nonessentials could well 
cause men and women both to 
garner a series of failure rather 
than successes over the next six 
or seven days. Hope rests with 
the improvement of personal 
relationships and the peaceable 
laying to rest of old ghosts, old 
arguments. Early in the week 
there may be a number of oppor- 
tunities for gain; as the week 
draws to a close, however, such 
opportunities grow fewer until, 
by week's end, they are as non- 
existent as if they had never 
beenr. It is, then, a week when, as 
the old adage has it, the early 
bird catches the worm; indeed, 
for the truly early to rise, the 
"worms" may prove to be both 
many and of exceptional worth. 

The coming week is one which 
may well see the end of a num- 
ber of. things: the present phase 
of a given work; at-home pro- 
jects which, up to now, have 
acted as solidifying agents for 
the family as a whole; and, most 
importantly, the uncertainty 
which has marked individual vi- 
sions of the future. This could, in 
fact, well be the week that sees 
all manner of plans for the 
future worked into final shape, 
made ready for implementation. 

CANCER (June 21-July 7) - 
Though you may have planned 
other things for this week, you 
would do well to stick to what 
you know. Work toward estab- 
lished goals. (July 8- July 22) - 

Take care that you are not 
placed in a position where you 
will have to make spur-of-the- 
moment decisions. Ask for the 
time you need for study. 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 7) - This 
might well be the week that a 
change in employment becomes 
not only desirable but necessary. 
Seek advice from friends in 
another field. (Aug. 7-Aug. 22) -- 
Make an effort to secure your 
own immediate future, while at 
the same time you demonstrate 
an interest in the efforts of 
otheres to gain success. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 7) - 
This is a week when extra 
amounts of vitality can bring you 
quickly within sight of new goals. 
Refuse to rest on your laurels - 
though tempted to do so. (Sept. 8- 
Sept. 22) - Routine chores cannot 
be totally ignored, but can be 
made relatively light work of 
this week. Look to new ways and 
means. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 7) - 
You should have an excellent op- 
portunity to display your 
knowledge of new tactics during 
the next few days. Week's end 
sees your reputation grown. (Oct. 
8-Oct. 22) -- You would do well to 
demonstrate your ability to han- 
dle a new job - but do so in a 
way that won't leave others feel- 
ing inferior. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 7) - 
You will have to work extra 
hard this week if you are to 
achieve new goals set by old 



friends. Stick to essentials early 
in the week; expand later. (Nov. 
8-Nov. 21) - Avoid those nones- 
sential aspects of your work that 
take away from the overall pic- 
lure of success you are trying to 
get across to others. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 
Dec. 7) — You can exceed all ex- 
pectations this week - even your 
own - if you will take advantage 
of new details recently come to 
light. Move quickly. (Dec. 8-Dec. 
21) ~ Keep to those activities you 
know best - but don't allow 
yourself to be pushed into the 
background. Insist upon your 
chance to move ahead. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22- Jan. 6) 

— Make an effort to bring a 
modicum of peace into another's 
life. Your view of the present 
situation on the home front 
should be shared. (Jan. 7- Jan. 19) 
-- Remain out of arguments, 
whether at home or on the 
employment scene, until you are 
absolutely certain of saying just 
the right thing to win. 

AQUARIUS. (Jan 20- Feb. 3) 

— Education of the young is es- 
sential to the intelligent perfor- 
mance of the adult. Make your 
views known; seek to be heard 
by experts. (Feb. 4-Feb. 18) - 
Avoid bringing to a head any 
issue that can cause a breach to 
form between you and loved 
ones. Give time a chance to heal 
minor hurts this week. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 5) - 
You can avoid friction with 

loved ones this week if you are 
careful not to press your suit 
regarding home affairs too 
urgently. Take your time! 
(March 6-March 20) - Personal 
relationships require exceplionai 
finesse this week if they an. not 
to be sacrificed to a desire for 
material gain. Think! 

ARIES (March 21-April 4) - 
If you are wise you will not allow 
underlings to get out of hand 
early in the week. Otherwise, you 
may have difficulties by week's 
end. (April 5-April 19) - It is es- 
sential that discipline be 
restored, both 04 the home front 
and on the employment scene. 
Set an example; obey rules and 
regulations. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 5) - 
This is a week which may bring 
you greater success than you 
had anticipated - but only in 
fields of minor interest. Career 
success may have to wait. (May 
6-May 20) - If you are careful to 
keep pleasure from interfering 
with business, you can have ex- 
ceptional success on both leveLs. 
Friends are supportive. 

GEMINI (May 21-June 6) - 
This is a good week for making 
plans for the next few months. If 
you are sure you have chosen 
your part well, move to secure it 
for yourself. (June 7- June 20) - 
Though you may be busy setting 
your own course of action, you 
would do well also to concern 
yourself with another's future. 
Share! 

I <lM-»*t. 18T& t ibmI K<s*uv SvnriK at •. In 




12 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



The Ole Swimmin' Hole 



By Aaron Huber 

Looking for a swimming hole in 
the Amherst area to escape a 
summer's day heat is not always 
easy. The first place that always 
comes to mind is the swimming 
hole of younger days. Swimming 
was much more fun then, because 
it was expressly forbidden. The 
element of thrill added to the fun: 
there was always a large rock high 
above the water, or a threadbare 
rope hanging from a tree. The air 
was filled with calls for to see which 
person would go the farthest. 
Nearby was a piece for persons 
timid enough to be called 
"chicken" to wade in. 

Located in North Amherst, 
Puffer's Pond has all the makings of 
that old swimming hole. A large 
rock formation on the northwest 
side of the pond is nature's answer 
to the high dive. On a busy day 
swimmers wait in line while those 
ahead of them drum up enough 
courage to make a daring leap over 
the rocks into the water. For those 
less daring, on the southeast side of 
the pond is an area for picnickers 
and sunbathers. 

Officially named Factory Hollow 
pond, but commonly known as 
Puffer's, the pond is controlled by 
the Amherst Conservation Com- 
mission. It's a place where many 
swimming hole enthusiasts in the 
area go on a good swimming day. 

"Swimming is legally prohibited" 

at Puffer's Pond, according to 
Conservation Officer Kete 
Westover. "Amherst is not liable 
for accidents there while swim- 
ming," he said. 

■ The town is considering whether 
or not to turn it legally into a 





L ANDRY'S MAR KET 

The Oldest Grocery in Amherst 



A Waterfall buff bares it all as he cools off beneath the falls at 
Puffer's Pond. 



swimming area. Right now it would 
be too expensive, Westover said. 
They could get a life guard, he said, 
but then it probably wouldn't be as 
fun or as popular as swimming 
illegally. 

During the hot weather in May 
there were minor complaints to the 



Conservation Commission and 
Police Department from residents 
near the pond about trespassing 
and vandalism. It was felt these 
complaints were due to UMass 
students in town during extremely 
hot weather, increasing the amount 
of swimmers. Westover said. 



Michelobe — 12 oz. Nr — 6.50 case 


1.69 six pack 


Munich — 12 oz. NR — 4. 25 case 


1.09 six pack 


Balentine Ale — l2oz. NR — 5.55 case 


1.39 six pack 


Heineken— 12 oz. Nr — 14.95 case 


3.75 six pack 


Schaefer— 12 oz. cans — 5.50 case 


1.39 six pack 


Ice 


50c for eleven pound bag 


Pure Hardwood Charcole — 1.29 


18 lb. bag i 


Fresh ground beef 


79c lb. 


Tenderloin Steak 


2.591b. 


(Fillet Mignion) 




First Prize Franks 


3 1b. family pack 3.99 


Kayem Franks (Skinless) — 1 .29 for lb — 


7 lb. box 8.35 


Check our other low steak & 


meat prices 


Balogna 




Veal Loaf 


all only $1.09 lb. 


P & P Loaf 


- 


Idelnot farm fresh milk 


1.43 gal. 


' Cabots triple score butter 


89c lb. 


Vermont chedder cheese 


1.491b. 


Sweet Red plums 


59c lb. 


California bing cherries 


69c lb. 


New seedless grapes 


79c lb. 


Iceburg lettuce 3 heads 


87C 


711 Main St. Amherst 253-5387 


On the Belchertown Bus Route 



campus carousel] 



By Tony Granite 
SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE at 
USoFIa was curtailed in June 
because of lack of riders, according 
to the Oracle, there. 

When the University invested 
$18,000 to keep the bus in 
operation for 60 days, it anticipated 
an averaged of 1,000 roders a day. 
The most they could attract was 
306. 

Its undoing was possibly the 10- 
cent fare. 

+ + + 
BEER BUST? There's a psych prof 
at UWis-Stevens Point who 
collects beer cans as a hobby. 

A member of Beer Can Collectors 
of America, the prof exhibits 800 in 
his basement. His collection awaits 
a pornographic beer can reportedly 
appearing in Denmark, according to 
The Pointer. 

+ + + 
EDITOR WANTED ADS IN The 
Denver Clarion drew only one 
applicant. And he was rejected by 
the student communications board. 

When Maurice Mitchell applied, 
he had the experience - he used to 
run weekly newspapers in Upstate 



New York. But he was not qualified 
because he was not a student. He is 
the Chancellor of the University of 
Denver. 

But the publicity surrounding his 
willingness to serve did result in 
filling the position. Four applicants 
came forth, and one was chosen. 

+ + + 
HAPPINESS AT I.U. is the 
operating budget finding approval 
in the legislative mainstream. The 
more than $61,000,000 proposal 
includes a prohibition against fee 
increases. The amount is 15.48 per 
cent more than the Legislature 
allowed in 1964-65. 
fllllf 



^TES 
OF SMITH COLLEGE 



QrMUSC 

NORTHAMPTON 



-NOW-7:00&9:15 
-only area showing- 




ClM\\jedA 



FOR SALE 

Cassette tapes. 
6702. 



M0N t TUES Ml SUTS 11.00 



AMHERSTO^ 

Air ( onditionrd 
Amity St ,b.i S4?6 



"What ■ Mm! Inatantly ona of 

[R | tha tan bnl moviaa of lha 
yaar. Fadanco Fallini ta a 
diractor that I admire abova 
lallothara.' ■•a^iai'i 



PEItN'S 




Eve J 7:00 & ftll 
Sat. A Sun Mat. 1:30 



MON 4 TUES ALL SLATS 11.00 



Big selection 549 
t«7-9 



Huge wood desk, (approx. 3x6 ft. 
surface); cheap stereo system; 
comfortable reclining chair; tape 
recorder. Moving to the big apple 
and leaving it all behind. Cell Jerry 
anytime at 263 9869 

tf 



INSTRUCTIONS 

Recorder instruction: I will help 
you develop your playing for 
greater enjoyment. Beginners 
welcome. Stuart 256-8098. 

7-2 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

Responsible, neat, quiet person 
for own room in Riverglade 256- 
8015. 

7-2,9 



Kenwood 7002 Amp. 100 wrms; 
with Marantz clinic report. Exc. 
cond. 666-4244. 

7-2 

CALCULATOR 

Calculator HP 21 all standard 
access Ories including warranty. 
Recent gift. Never used $85. Mark 
2637788. 

7-2 

WANTED 

3 speed girl's bike wanted. 26 in. 

wheels. 20 in. frame or there about. 
253 9869. 

7-2 



SUBLET 

Roommate wanted to share rent. 
2 bedrm apt Sunderland, on bus 
route. Call Don or Al after 6:00 p.m. 
665 2811. 

tf7-9 

SERVICES 

College student seeks painting in 
Amherst area. 4 years exp. Free 
estimates. Dave 549-3832. 

7-2 

Do you need any odd jobs done 
around the house? Heavy labor is 
my specialty! Lifting, mowing, 
gardening, peinting. you name it. 
Call anytime, 549-3626 and leave 
message for Ed Colby. 



MOUNTAIN FARMS FOUR 



'THUNDER MAP' was why a phacho mm 

tau tafc* a load of 200 proof com l*ha» 

THIS IS THE REM THIM ■»— * • p<*c mbm m 

too mitas an hoor and if you ami a 



RflA Qlfs^ MOUNTAIN FARMS MAIL 
JOH-JIJJ ROUTE 9-MADLEY MASS 




tfaad man yo^ n» a moomunnai 




UKEFATMKR 

LIKE SOW 

ftIG JIM 
MITCHUM 

OCAR OtttMOIMG 
TlfaH •MM AMINO 
MOT ROOOiNO 
)TV«0 SHINC' 



eb 

United Arlisls 



(PG| 



starring. JAMES MITCHUM 

M thru Th. 1:11, 8:30; TwrlHcr 5:454:15. Krl. 
It If, 7:30,»:4S. T»Hk*r 4 : 45-5 1 5. Sa I 2 : 1 5. 5 : 1 S. 
7:30. t:45; twrllter 4:45-5:15. San. 2:15. 0:15. 
*:30. TwMtler 5:454:15. 



I r 



CUNT 
THE 



I III 



ara: 



SANCTION 



"This year's must-see 

PlCtlir8.~ Andrew Sam: Wfrfje Vote* 

■ _v Jack Nicholson 

W^ Maria Schneider 

> Michelangelo Antonioni's 
^fossenger 




ION-TUE-DOLLAR Night! 

iiimiii 



M. thru Th. 0:00, VIS; twMttrr 5 304:00. rrl. 
5:00, 7:15; » 30; 1*1- liter 4:30-5:00 Sal.. 2:00. 
S:00,7:IS.»:30; t»HKer 4 .10-5 00 Sun 2 00 ft 00 
A: IS; twHlter 5:30-0:00. 



M. thru Th. 5:45. 1:1$; twMitcr 5:15-5:45 Krl. 
1:45 7:15.0:30; twrltlrr 4:15-4 45. Sat. 2:00. 4:45. 
7:15. (:3s: t» Miter 4:15-4:45. Sun. 2:00. 5:45; 
1:15; (Writer. 5:15-5:45. 



PG 



NOT SINCE LCVE STORY- 

'THE 
OTHER SIDE 

OF THE 
MOUNTAIN' 

III! 01 ret*. Ml 'I l>! Mil MOI MAIN 

Surnn* MAftfltN I^SSI I I ., 1,11 K .nmonl 

and HI M HKMK.4S j.Dnt Hueh 

M. thru Th. 1:15, 8:3*. IwHIter 5:454:15. Frl. 
S:IS.7:3».t:4S; twi-incT 4: 45-5:15. Sat M5. 5:15, 
7:3«. »:4S, twt-IKer 4:45-5:1$. San. 2:15. IS. 
»:30; IWelHrr S4S4I5. 



JULY 9 "THE EXORCIST" 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



THE WIZARD OF ID 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



\ 



R? You PBueve in thb s&pa&Atioh 

C&- CHJFtH AUf STAT& r* 



f Wo\Ji.v YOU 3& WIul-ioJ^. 72? ^ 
"S>W&A1Z T& THAT &N Th& 3|F3LE 
IH A C£>UPT <Z*F UAW f* 




by Brant parlur and Johnny hart 



F\FT\ 



'THIS \S> HOW 
'r THey NAll.BC> 
C ifcjflN /VIlTfcHiSLU 

V 




B.C. 



7 



by johnny hart 



WAY YoUfZ rv\r6TRe^S C?IE AND 
LEAVE ALU HEJ? VMoRLDlY' 
»3eLC»Nc&IM6r^ TO YOUR WIFE. 

Y 





WAY YtXJR t3EST FRIEND Hlf?e 12 

lau<&hin£> Hyenas as mcxjrner^ 

AT t£*JR WAKE. 



FEIFFER 




wuuJm a 

J0d AT STrMB? 
1,61 WOUR 
QUkllFlCA- 

Tlais 




IU V5H I U)ARk£W 
AoA/USr OUR 
BlJAiJCInx3 FRO)CH 
.JlJLOUIALISH IK) 
IUCO-CHIIUA- 



W ti£g I FR5PICWP THAT 
C0MMIT7IU3 U-i MA/\$ORS 
TO 6CVW U(5T«JAH UJOULP 
lEKV TO AW AMtRlCAlU 
WAR. v 



i'W W*5I Vb\XXJk)C&? 
THS eOHB/W6 OF aJORTH 
VltTUM AS COUMER:- 
PRCWCTN6 



r^^Qi 





IU WO I PRCttttV THAT 
ltVJVArT/106 CAM80P/A COXV 
OKW LfAP TO P/6ASTFR 

\ 



»<bl^> , 




7-~ 



iW. WOT 

TH5 &KE V6PT 






5EK) RfcSHT 
51 LLC" IW? 





RfrSriT AUP 60ROU3 
IS R35 HlSTORlAjos 
WOO VO MOT FIT (W 
WITH THf Tf5AM 



^Ch 





Kris Jackson 



Your Stars This Week 

By Stella Wilder 




A tendency to be preoccupied 
with nonessentials could well 
cause men and women both to 
garner a series of failure rather 
than successes over the next six 
or seven days. Hope rests with 
the improvement of personal 
relationships and the peaceable 
laying to rest of old ghosts, old 
arguments. Early in the week 
there may be a number of oppor- 
tunities for gain; as the week 
draws to a close, however, such 
opportunities grow fewer until, 
by week's end, they are as non- 
existent as if they had never 
been*. It is, then, a week when, as 
the old adage has it, the early 
bird catches the worm; indeed, 
for the truly early to rise, the 
"worms" may prove to be both 
many and of exceptional worth. 

The coming week is one which 
may well see the end of a num- 
ber of. things: the present phase 
of a given work; at-home pro- 
jects which, up to now, have 
acted as solidifying agents for 
the family as a whole; and, most 
importantly, the uncertainty 
which has marked individual vi- 
sions of the future. This could, in 
fact, well be the week that sees 
all manner of plans for the 
future worked into final shape, 
made ready for implementation. 

CANCER (June 21-July 7) - 
Though you may have planned 
other things for this week, you 
would do well to stick to what 
you know. Work toward estab- 
lished goals. (July 8- July 22) -- 

Take care that you are not 
placed in a position where you 
will have to make spur-of-the- 
moment decisions. Ask for the 
time you need for study. 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 7) - This 
might well be the week that a 
change in employment becomes 
not only desirable but necessary. 
Seek advice from friends in 
another field. (Aug. 7-Aug. 22) - 
Make an effort to secure your 
own immediate future, while at 
the same time you demonstrate 
an interest in the efforts of 
otheres to gain success. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 7) - 
This is a week when extra 
amounts of vitality can bring you 
quickly within sight of new goals. 
Refuse to rest on your laurels - 
though tempted to do so. (Sept. 8- 
Sept. 22) -- Routine chores cannot 
be totally ignored, but can be 
made relatively light work of 
this week. Look to new ways and 
means. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. D - 
You should have an excellent op- 
portunity to display your 
knowledge of new tactics during 
the next few days. Weeks end 
sees your reputation grown. (Oct. 
8-Oct. 22) - You would do well to 
demonstrate your ability to han- 
dle a new job - but do so in a 
way that won't leave others feel- 
ing inferior. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 7) - 
You will have to work extra 
hard this week if you are to 
achieve new goals set by old 



friends. Stick to essentials early 
in the week; expand later. (Nov 
8-Nov. 21) - Avoid those nones- 
sential aspects of your work that 
take away from the overall pic- 
ture of success you are trying to 
get across to others. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 
Dec. 7) — You can exceed all ex- 
pectations this week - even your 
own - if you will take advantage 
of new details recently come to 
light. Move quickly. (Dec. 8-Dec. 
21) - Keep to those activities you 
know best - but don't allow 
yourself to be pushed into the 
background. Insist upon your 
chance to move ahead. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 6) 

— Make an effort to bring a 
modicum of peace into another's 
life. Your view of the present 
situation on the home front 
should be shared. (Jaa 7- Jan. 19) 
-- Remain out of arguments, 
whether at home or on the 
employment scene, until you are 
absolutely certain of saying just 
the right thing to win. 

AQUARIUS .(Jan 20-Feb. 3) 

— Education of the young is es- 
sential to the intelligent perfor- 
mance of the adult. Make your 
views known; seek to be heard 
by experts. (Feb. 4-Feb. 18) - 
Avoid bringing to a head any 
issue that can cause a breach to 
form between you and loved 
ones. Give time a chance to heal 
minor hurts this week. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 5) - 
You can avoid friction with 

loved ones this week if you are 
careful not to press your suit 
regarding home affairs too 
urgently. Take your time! 
(March 6-March 20) - Personal 
relationships require exceptional 
finesse this week if they ar. not 
to be sacrificed to a desire for 
material gain. Think 1 

ARIES (March 21-April 4) - 
If you are wise you will not allow 
underlings to get out of hand ' 
early in the week. Otherwise, you 
may have difficulties by week's 
end. (April 5-April 19) - It is es- 
sential that discipline be 
restored, both <* the home front 
and on the employment scene. 
Set an example; obey rules and 
regulations. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 5) - 
Thus is a week which may bring 
you greater success than you 
had anticipated - but only in 
fields of minor interest. Career 
success may have to wait. (May 
6-May 20) - If you are careful to 
keep pleasure from interfering 
with business, you can have ex- 
ceptional success on both levels. 
Friends are supportive. 

GEMINI (May 21-June 6) - 
This is a good week for making 
plans for the next few months. If 
you are sure you have chosen 
your part well, move to secure it 
for yourself. (June 7- June 20) -- 
Though you may be busy setting 
your own course of action, vou 
would do well also to concern 
yourself with another's future. 
Share! 

< <iMT**t IHTk I MhI rVatiav SvnrUab-. Ir* 






u 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



+ The Hay Report 



Continued from page 2 

George Odiorne. dean of the 
School of Bus/ness, said of the 
report, "It does have a centralizing 
effort Wood is under political 
pressure to produce efficiency and 
avoid duplication of effort. He also 
has to respond to a diminishing 
budget and declining enrollment." 

Odiorne, though not alarmed by 
the report, said he will watch it with 
interest. "The test is what it will 
look like in implementation. If it 
drives out or discourages lower 
level department chairmen or deans 
because it turns them into puppets, 
then mediocrity will follow", he 
added. 



No Input 

John O'Keefe, president of the 
Student Government Association, 
said he doesn't think the report will 
change anything. "As far as input 
into decision-making processes, 
students have no real input now. 
We're virtually ignored in the areas 
that have anything to do with 
operations or management, such as 
the budget," he continued. 

In his estimation, the report's 
recommendations will increase 
efficiency and organization, im- 
prove planning and eliminate 
waste. "But," he added, "if all the 
planning at UMass is towards a 
centralized system rather than 



towards localized needs, it will take 
away from the autonomy of the 
campuses." 

President Wood last week called 
the Hay Report "essentially an 
administrative rearrangement." He 
rejected the idea that the report 
represents the outcome of a 
contest for power between himself 
and the chancellors. 

"What this hopefully will do will 
be to free the campuses for far 
more effective program 

development, especially in 
academic affairs," he said. 

Wood pointed out that some 
faculty and students still believe 
that the initiation of all policies 
must start with faculty and 
students before they come up to 
the Trustees. He said that hasn't 
been the case at UMass since the 
present governance document was 



enacted in 1970. 

"Policy initiative authority has 
always resided with the Trustees 
and the President's Office," he 
observed. 

Turning to the non-controversial 
part of the report, Wood said Hay 
Associates found that UMass 
compensation schedules are 
conservative for a system of its size 
and complexity; the report also 
indicated that UMass salaries 



sometines fall below those of 
counterparts in the private area of 
higher education. 

The Hay Report was accepted in 
concept at the June 4 Board of 
Trustees meeting. Details con- 
cerning a plan to put it into practice 
were left to the President and 
chancellors to work out over the 
sun ner. 



* Faculty unionization 



Continued from page 2 

Forsyth pointed out that it is the 
faculty and not the administration 
which must make the ultimate 
choice. 

Members of both the MSP and 
AAUP committees as well as 
administration representatives met 
together at an informal hearing on 
June 4 to discuss various issues 
pertaining to the election. At the 
hearing, there was some con- 
troversy concerning the com- 
position of the "bargaining unit" 
(those who are to be represented 
by the agent). 

The MSP statement defines the 
"unit" as consisting of "instructors, 
assistant professors, associate 
professors, full professors, and 
professional librarians", but the 



administration questioned whether 
department heads and chairpersons 
should be included in the unit. This 
complication remained unresolved 
at the meeting but a formal hearing 
will be scheduled sometime in the 
future at which time both the 
faculty and the administration will 
present their stands. 

The final decision will then be 
made by the MLRC Massachusetts 
State Labor Relations Commission. 

Two years ago, a drive for faculty 
unionization at UMass received 
little attention from the majority of 
faculty membes. The prospect of 
an outside agency powerful enough 
to represent the entire faculty end 
collect "union dues" was enough 
to dissuade many UMass 



professors from voting in favor of 
collective bargaining. 

President Gawienowski accounts 
for the change in attitudes in 
economical terms. 

"A couple of years ago, UMass 
was a growing campus and saleries 
were very good, but recently since 
professors do not receive a cost-of- 
living increase, saleries have ac- 
tually decreased," he said. 

Forsyth also points out that 
people do tend to move towards 
collective bargaining whenever the 
economic situation creates am- 
biguity. Still, Forsyth feels that 
there has been no real change in 
attitudes towards collective 
bargaining. 

"There will always be those in 
favor, opposed and undecided," 
Forsyth said. 



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15 



Movies 



Review 



Cast 

Clouseau - Peter Sellers 

Lady Litton - Catherine Schell 

Lord Litton - Christopher 

Hummer 

Inspector Dreyfuss - Herbert Lorn 

When "The Pink Panther" and 
"A Shot in the Dark" came out in 
the 1960's, a new screen detective 
was born. Unlike the suave 
detectives of the 40's played by 
such greats as Humphrey Bogart 
and William Powell, Peter Sellers 
created an inept, bumbling, 



detective named Clouseau. He 
stumbled on a crime's solution 
purely by accident - and even then 
missed the fact he had solved the 
crime. 

Millions of movie-goers the world 
over laughed at French detective 
Clouseau as he mispronounced 
words, roared when he stuck his 
nose in cold cream and rolled in the 
aisles when Clouseau searched a 
suspect's room and completely 
destroyed it in 5 minutes. 

Due to popular demand, the Pink 
Panther is back in a new movie, 
appropriately titled "The Return of 



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the Pink Panther". The movie 
comes complete with the 
characters, Henry Mancini music, 
and cartoon of the previous movie 
of the same name. 

There is even less of a plot th 
an in the first "Panther". The film 
consists of a story developed 
around sight gags and comedy bits. 

The plot itself is relatively simple. 

The precious Pink Panther 
diamond, stolen in the first film is 
taken again. The theft is ac- 
complished in an exciting scene in 
which the thief foils the incredibly 
elaborate security system 
surrounding the stone. 

Is it the "Phantom" once again 
or is ti true he has retired? After all, 
his calling card, a white glove 
monogrammed with a "P" is found 
at the scene of the crime. 

Because Clouseau solved the 
original crime, his services are 
requested again. Clouseau never 
benefitted from his first diamond 



recovery success. Consigned to a 
Paris Street beat, he has just been 
suspended from the force for failing 
to notice a bank robbery in progress 
right in front of his oversize Gallic 
nose when the movie opens. 

From the movie's beginning, the 
pitfalls and pratfalls Inspector 
Clouseau is prone to occur con- 
tinuously. Although many are | 
predictable, Sellers pulls them off 
with great finesse and originality. 

Aitnougn the ending is 
predictable, there is plenty of room 
to bring Clouseau back again in 
future movies. 

Other characters from the 
original "Panther" include the 
"Phantom" and Inspector 
Dreyfuss, Clouseau's boss who 
despises him. Cato, Clouseau's 
oriental valet who constantly at- 
tacks his boss with karate to keep 
Clouseau's instincts sharp, also 
returns. 

Subplots swirl through the film. 



Someone is trying to steal the 
diamond from the robber, someone 
is trying to kill Clouseau, and the 
"Phantom" professes to be 
searching for the diamond. 

Peter Sellers has been ill-used in 
films in recent years. But with the 
help of director Blake Edwards' 
comedic touches, Sellers shines. 
Plus, Sellers gets excellent help 
from his supporting actors. 

Not only will the fans of the 
earlier Clouseau movies thoroughly 
enjoy "The Return of the Pink 
Panther" but those who never saw 
the previous two movies in the 
series will like them too. 

But don't expect Humphrey 
Bogart to come out smoking a 
cigarette. Be prepared for Clouseau 
to stumble out with an unlit 
cigarette and a pack of sopping wet 
matches. 

by Judith Wolinsky Soloway 



Books 



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2 



ANOTHER ROADSIDE 
ATTRACTION 

ByTOMROBBINS 
[Ballantine Books\ 
You've never heard of this book. 
I know, I know. The only glimmer of 
familiarity came from a cashier at 
the Odyssey whose New Hamp- 
shire boyfriend had met a street 
cleaner, who had found the book 
discarded in a suburban lane, read it 
on company time, and recom- 
mended it. Furthermore, this book 
was published in 1971, and why it 
hasn't found its way down the 
trickling media paths into our hearts 
is as much a mystery to me as the 
book itself. If I do anything in my 
life (as some have lately prodded 
me to do so), may I perform the civil 
service as a dutiful citizen of Oz of 
spreading the word about this 
expansively delightful novel. 

By way of introduction: tattooed 
Amanda, Thor, loinclothed John 
Paul Ziller, troubleshooter Plucky 
Purcell, Mon Cul the baboon (No 
need to fear. He's been around the 
world once and has met everybody 
twice), Nearly Normal Jimmy, two 
garter snakes, a butterfly museum, 
a flea circus, a dead tse tse fly, and, 
mutilated fragments of Ziller's 
journal from his trip to Africa. Or 
was it India? 

The book also contains a fan- 
tastical plot, unbelievable believable 
characters, East-West epiphanies, 
that rare probing, arousing device 
known as a mind tickler, and the 
disclosure of the dreaded (in some 
quarters) Tibetan invasion. I refuse 
to give you any more clues, err, 
tidbits, so that you may savor the 
surprises for yourself. 

There seems to be a cultural 
mode of writing that has become 
established in the 1970's. This 
manner is characterized by authors 
who use a Joycean virtuosity of the 
language in a psychedelic frenzy 
and whose main thrust seems to be 
stimulus barrage. Everyday, 



comfortably grasped meanings are 
hard to find in these books. They 
have a frenetic pace, and the reader 
feels as if he-she has been taken on 
a 'trip down a Las Vegas strip of 
techno-culture crazed, fragmented 
frames. I'm sure you've picked up 
such a book recently, and the list of 
obscure titles and authors is long. 
Tom Robbins, though a 
homesteader of this style (as his 
journal indicates), is best described 
as a contemporary Mark Twain. 
Just as Twain wrote beautifully in 
the generic of the rural, mid- 
American, 19th century mind-set, 
Robbins writes in the generic of the 
information bonked, 
psychedelicized, cross-culturally 
affected, contemporary thinking 
individual. Robbins finds meaning 
in this world; an accomplishment 
that separates this book from its 
far-out brothers. 

If your definition of genius is 
"one who constructs unimaginable 
things out of everyday objects, and 
those constructed things have 
beauty, new knowledge, new 
horizons, a veritable manifest 
destiny of concepts", then Robbins 
qualifies. Indeed, his metaphors 
and similies will hit you like fighting 
Muhammed Ali blindfolded and 
without a cup. His command of the 
language, his mastery of many 
subjects (including myself), his 
style, his uncanny humor, his 
warmth, his mind-bending ar- 
ticulation, is a rare canary. 

This book encourages you to 
enjoy. It encourages you to think. It 
encourages you to be horny as hell. 
It encourages you to open your 
eyes and ears and nostrils in 
wonder and delight. It encourages 
you to slap Aqua-Velva on your 
Third Eye. 

For example: did you know that 
the orange-petaled Monarch 
butterfly in its cocoon has an in- 
stinctual birth response only during 
thundershowers? And that Amanda 
claims her son, Thor, was con- 



ceived by-during an electrical 
storm? I didn't believe it myself until 
I saw his kilowatt eyes. 

Did you know that baboons are 
the most intelligent and plentiful 
creatures of the ape world? (Take a 
bow, Mon Cul.) 

Did you know that of the five 
thousand varieties of mushrooms 
four.J in the United States that 
2,500 are found in western 
Washington? (the rain-blasted 
setting of these escapades) 

Did you know that "To an artist 
the metaphor is as real as a dollar"? 

So there. You have no choice but 
to read the book. Especially if you 
like the girl; the girl; Amanda. 

As a departing means of en- 
ticement, and, as a foil to those 
speedos who only read the last 
paragraph of a review to find the 
reviewee's buckworthiness, I ask 
you to look at the quotes Robbins 
has chosen to grace the front of his 
elongated epistle. They may have a 
historic and profound effect on 
each and every one of us. 

"and there are also many other 
things which Jesus did, the which, 
if they should be written every one, 
I suppose that even the world itself 
could not contain the books that 
should be written." 

John 21:25 

"Incidentally, Reggie Fox, who 
runs the Dalai Lama's 16-mm. 
projector, said that 16-mm. Tarzan 
films or Marx Brothers films would 
make a big hit with the Dalai Lama 
and those around him. They most 
certainly don't want to see any 
pictures where human or animal life 
is taken; amusement and adventure 
are the things that they are in- 
terested in." 

Lowell Thomas, Jr., OUT OF 
THIS WORLD (Appendix, "What 
to Take When You Go to Tibet") 



By Tom Coffey 



Concerts 



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Eric Clapton 

Santa na 

Springfield Civic Center 

July 24 

Oh how we wished, oh how we 
strove mightily to get you the fax as 
to this mighty show. We made 
good our trip to Springfield, parked 
the car in Civic Center Yard and 
approached the Special Door. But 
yo and lo, the stout yoman guard 
gave us not a passage to the 
musicworld within the concrete 
walls of fair hockey rink. "No, uh, 




sorry, no. We'd like to, but the 
promoter man, man, he's bullshit. 
'No free passes! No press!' he says. 
So you're gonna have to move 
away from the door before he sees 
us and thinks I'm sneakin' you in." 
Having not the bread to offer the 
kind guard a little persuading, we 
proceeded North, back home to cry 
on your shoulders and rub our 
selves with misery. After all, we're 
not made a stupidity. 

-Mike 'Cream Crock' Kostek 



»».,.,.. 



16 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WFDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1975 



Comments 






Rob Melacasa 



Where to go 



Picture this scene, if you will: a young couple is pushing their tired 
Volkswagen van beyond the limits of endurance on a sizzling 
Sunday afternoon in search of a cool, clean, and quiet picnic spot. 

"How about one of these roadside areas?" suggests someone. 

"Not unless you want gravel and carbon monoxide as salt and 
pepper" counters the partner. 

"Why don't we just pull off and hoof it into the woods?" 

"Sure, we can spread our blanket right under the sign that says 
'no fires, fishing, hunting, camping, or pissing?". And on it goes for 
many miles, past many a Howard Johnson's and MacDonald's, 
innumerable furniture stores (all of whom are chopping and 
slashing), motels, gas stations, and industrial parks. Finally, there 
appears a weather worn sign which declares "so and so Park - 20 
miles of secluded picnic areas - next right":. The van's occupants, 
breathing a sigh of relief, lean into the turn, and pray silently until 
they reach the top of a six mile, steeply graded, dusty cow path, 
finally reaching their destination - a parking lot. Twenty acres of 
screaming kids and flying frisbees, cramed together like chips in 
chocolate chip ice cream used to be. And best of all, the "picnic 
permit price" is a mere $2.00 for three hours $1.00 extra if you build a 
fire or use a grill). 

Has this happened to you friends? Are you tired of watching other 
people's kids playing Kojak through your potato salad? Does the 
sound of someone's pickup truck radio blaring a country and 
western station wilt your pickles? Are you bored with watching the 
old incendiary sacrifice routine; drowning six pieces of charcoal with 
three cans of lighter fluid in an avocado colored grill so big it needs 
its own trailer? Is that what's bugging you bunky? 
§Well, here's what you do. Go to your local bank and borrow 5,000 
dollars. Now, pack up your dog and drive as far north as you can go, 
then put the 5 grand down on a piece of land (at today's prices that 
should get you about 100 sq. ft). Then, using that as collateral, 
borrow $2000 more and put a 10 foot high fence around it with 
barbed wire at the top and a "no trespassing" sign every six feet. 
Then make an arrangement with the local law enforcement agency 
to keep an eye out for peace poachers, for which services the local 
constabulary will also require a few bucks, but at least they won't 
make you sign any papers (besides, then you can add "police take 
notice" at the bottom of the sign). After you've accomplished all 
that you can look forward to at least 12 or 14 weekends of peace and 
quiet a year, not counting rainy days. 

§ls that unreasonable? You're damn right it is, but nevertheless the 
aforementioned solution is not too far off. More and more people are 
searching for the same type of recreational areas, and there just 
aren't enough to go around. Once discovered, the area becomes 
commercialized, or a dump, or both, in one short season. 
§Even the former hiker's heaven, White Mountain National Park, has 
now been redubbed Hacker's Haven. Over crowded campers did so 
much damage last year that this season only a limited number will be 
issued overnight permits. And you will not be allowed to set foot in 
the park without one. Our national forests are beginning to look like 
Woolco on a Saturday afternoon. Puffer's pond, our local swimming 
hole, is now in danger of being restricted because people have 
abused Mother Nature's (and the neighbor's) generosity. 
IBut cheer up, friends, all the good spots are not gone yet. I happen 
to know a place near the University where you can still skinny dip 
unmolested (hell no, I won't tell you where it is!) Once a week I Hang 
up my clothes on the nail that holds up the sign that says 
"Restricted; no swimming, hunting, fishing, camping, pissing, etc. 



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-I 



Who's kidding who? 



Here it is July second and the 
community is just becoming aware 
that we are in danger of losing a 
major source of entertainment and 
enlightenment. The funding crisis 
facing WMUA is an outrage. When 
it seems probable that we will lose 
the campus radio station we have 
fools telling us that a fund raising 
concert is not possible because of 
obscure bylaws in a document 
drawn up by known incompetents. 



Henry Ragin where are you? It does 
not matter where the money comes 
from, as long as it does come. 
Anyone denying the right of a 
student to donate money to keep 
the campus station on the air does 
not have the best interests of the 
students and community in mind. 
There is no place for petty 
politics, personal vendettas or other 
such hyperbole when such a crucial 
matter is at hand. In order to save 



J 



Gotfa Gripe? 
Write a letter 

to the Editor.: 



Arturo Brito 



With Thanks 

In 1970 only a few Latin American students walked 
the UMass-Amherst campus. Now, five years later, 
nearly three hundred Latin American students attend 
UMass-Amherst thanks to the tremendous efforts of 
those silen committed individuals who labored on our 
behalf all these years. 

Five years ago, there was no Bilingua Collegiate 
Program to offer the Spanish speaking residents of 
Massachusetts a chance to utilize their tremendous 
bilingual potential fo~ their own communities through 
a University education. 

Five years ago, there was no Spanish Speaking 
student's organization, AHORA. No Spanish 
Speaking student group to live and share with the 
University at large, their vibrant cultural heritage. No 
groups of Spanish Speaking students committed to 
the University involvement in, and on behalf of the 
Massachusetts communities. 

Five years ago, there were only a handful of 
Spanish Speaking individuals wtth the foresight and 
determination to force the University into a 
recognition of minority rights. So that we who have 
come after them, who enjoy the benefits and 
priviledges inhereited from those who initially labored 
behind our cause, owe to these as yet unsung in- 
dividuals a tremendous debt of gratitude. 

To Armando Morales, Fernando Colon, Olga 
Rodriguez, Mariano Trujillo, Donaciano Atencio, 
Rafael Otero, Gilberto Sotolongo, Eddie Sotolongo, 
Carmen Ama y Geno Saurez Galban and t 1 "* many 
individuals who have long since returned to work in 
the communities from which we come; we offer to 
you now a long overdue thank you. 

IIMHHU>MIM>m 



Mis Grocias 

En 1970 unos pocos estudiantes latinoamericanos 
asistian a la University dad de Massachusetts en 
Amherst. Ahora, cinco anos despues, cerca de 
trescientos-studiantes latinoamericanos atienden a 
clases en esta universidad gracias a los tremendos 
esfuerzos de los individuos bien comprometidos que 
laboraron por nosotros todos estos anos. 

Cinco anos atras, no exitia el Bilingual Collegiate 
Program que ofreciera a los residentes hispano 
parlantes de Massachusetts una oportunidad para 
utilizer su potencial bilingue en sus comunidades 
despues de una educacion universitaria. 

Cinco anos atras, no existian una organization de 
estudiantes hispanoparlantes, AHORA. No existia un 
grupo de estudiantes latinos que vivan y compartan 
con la universidad en general, susvibrantes herencias 
culturaJes. Ningun grupo de estudiantes de habla 
espanola se comprometio a envolver a la Universidad 
en los problemas de las comunidades. 

Cino anos atras, fueron solamente un punado de 
individuos de habia espanola con la determinancy 
de forzar a la Universidad s reconocer a los derechos 
de los grupos minoritarios. para que quines tienen que 
ve; ir en buses de eilos, quienes gozan de los 
beneficios y privilegios, hereden de quienes 
inicialmente laboraron detras de nueatra causa. Ea a 
ellos que debemoa una tremenda deuda de gratitud. 

Armando Morales, Fernando Colon, Olga 
Rodriquez, Mariano Trujillo, Donaciano Atencio, 
Rafael Otero, Gilberto Sotolongo, Eddie Sotolongo, 
Carmen Anna y Geno Saurez Balban, Heriberto Flores 
y muchos otros quienes han retornado a trabajar 
dentro de las comunidades de donde nosotros 
venimos para ofrecer su ayuda; ofrecemos a todos 
Vds. nuestra eterna gratitud. 

' ' ' ♦ <■ ♦ 



the summer we must save WMUA. 
If the financial wizards can figure a 
way to get around the by-laws 
WMUA can count on the Collegian 
for assistance in funding. The rest 
of the money should be raised in 
any manner possible, provided it 
does not violate state or federal 
laws. Senate binding clauses just 
don't cut it. 
This editorial represents the 

unanimous opinion of the Summer 
Collegian Board of Editors. 

- Zamir Nestelbaum H 

Power what? 

Power does strange things to people. It can take normal and at 
times well meaning persons and twist out of proportion their own 
sense of importance and correctness of mission. It can take normally 
strange people and send them teetering over the brink of insanity and 
infamous oblivion. And they are all dangerous because they have 
power over people - power to bully, miam, and even kill. . 

Witness into the first category, Indira Ghandi; she originally came 
to power armed with radical speech and a consensus to solve India's 
devastating problems. But the intervening years have witnessed her 
Government's failure to make a dent in the food crisis while it has 
frivolusly spent billions in its surreptitious gain of a nuclear capability 
(from a Canadian reactor). And now unrest has surfaced against her 
Government as she was brought before her nations leading tribunal 
and convicted of an admitted, though minor, election violation. In a 
moved to crack down on all political dissidents, mostly nonviolent 
and absolutely legal. She has arrested leaders of opposing parties, 
former followers of Ma hat ma Ghandi, dissident factions in her own 
Congress Party - using an Enemies List that pales its Nixonian 
counterpart by comparison. All the while deploying typically 
Nixonian rhetoric about the sanctity of the office and national 
security etc. Mrs. Ghandi has wiped out any semblance of legality to 
her rule and leaves no alternative short of a revolutionary one as an 
answer to India's future. 

An example ot tne second category is the deranged ejaculations 
coming out of the mouth of Uganda's Idi Amin. Long notorious for 
his psychotic ramblings, Amin has recently taken to executing 
foreign writers who call him bad names. In the past Amin has in 
addition to this foaming at the mouth, thrown out of Uganda 
countless thousands of Asian Ugandans and has jailed and executed 
scores of political opponents. Now displaying a skin thinner than his 
brain cells, Amin is proving that he is indeed the "village tyrant" that 
writer Dennis Hills accused him of being - by threatening to execute 
Hills for that statement. 

Humpty Dumpty sat on a Wall; 

Humpty Dumpty had a Great Fall; 

And All the King's Horses and All the King's Men, 

Couldn't put Humpty back together Again. 
Which brings us to Meldrim Thompson, New Hampshire's less 
than erstwhile governor. Not only did he ride the president of UNH 
out of town on a rail for merely allowing a homophile group to exist 
on campus (Communists and degenerates all) but his inflamed 
rhetoric has often painted Ford as a leftist extremist. And the nation 
will sadly have to witness his and publisher Loeb's pitiful 
machinations in the presidential primary next year, since they insist 
on keeping New Hampshire out of the rest of New England. 




THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



TELEPHONE 545 1982 




VOLUME I, ISSUE III 



AMHERST, MA 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 9 1975 




Stephen Gaskin and the Farm Band 

some foot stompin' music and a piece of philosophy: page 12 



UMaSS Budget where 
has all the money gone?: page 3 



School of Ed 

six probes, one report: page 2 



Freshmen Orientation Bike Collective 

a foothold on UMass' social hill: page 5 what a way to get around: page 7 



■— 



THE 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 197S 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1975, 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 




background, update 

Six investigations, 
only one report filed 



By Dan LaBonte 

It all began way back in the fall of last year. 

Bob H. Suzuki, then asst. dean for 
business in the School of Education, became 
suspicious when he discovered a state audit 
found that $13,000 of a $170,000 U.S. Law 
Enforcement Assistance Administration 
grant had been used for traveling and 
consulting expenses unrelated to the 
program. 

A volley of allegations concerning the 
academic programs and the administrative 
practices of the School of Ed followed when 
Suzuki issued a series of memos which 
stated his concern over the misappropriation 
of various grant funds. 

The allegations mushroomed, and the 
School of Ed, which had recently emerged 
from its relative obscurity and had gained 
national recognition for its bold, innovative, 
unorthodox- teacher prepar:ik>n methods, 
was once again in a media 'imelight that 
extended as far as the Education pages of 
TIME magazine. 

Six Investigations 

This time, the school was the subject of at 
least six different investigations, including 
probes from the FBI, the office of the U.S. 
Attorney General James Gabriel, the office 
of Hampshire-Franklin Dist. Atty. John 
Callahan, an international accounting firm, a 
"Visiting Committee" comprised of five 
nationally known educators, and a Faculty 
Senate Ad Hoc Committee of educators 
from within the University itself. 

At the time the investigations were 
initiated, hopes were high in the president's 
office that "all examinations of the adminis- 



trative and academic programs of the 
School" would be "substantially completed" 
by the end of the fiscal year, June 30th. 

However, a fiscal year 1975 came to a 
close, only one investigation team, the 
Faculty Senate Ad Hoc Committee, had 
completed their review of the School of Ed. 

The final report from the outside "Visiting 
Committee" is not expected for at least 
another week and a half, according to 
Howard White, a spokesperson from UMass 
president Robert Wood's office. 



"Searching Look" 

The Blue Ribbon Committee, appointed by 
Wood in March to "take a searching and 
critical look" at the programs, organization, 
and future direction of the School of Ed has, 
however, finished their investigation. Their 
report, which is in draft form, is currently 
being circulated among committee members 
for their final approval and comment, ac- 
cording to White. 

Although the final report was scheduled 
for completion at the end of June, "there has 
been approximately a two week delay in 
releasing a final completed report because of 
time-consuming mailing procedures coupled 
by the fact that some Committee members 
are as far away as Australia," White ex- 
plained. 

Once Wood's office receives final approval 
and comments from the Committee 
members, sometime in the middle of July, 
the final report is "essentially a matter of 
retyping" and will be made public, White 
said. 

Also in March of this year, president 
Wood, with the "support" of Chancellor 



Bromery and Treasurer Kenneth W. John- 
son, engaged the services of Coopers and 
Lybrand an international accounting firm, 
"to conduct audits of other School- of Ed 
programs which have not been the subject of 
any allegations of wrong doing, and to audit, 
evaluate, and advise the University on the 
appropriateness of its fiscal, accounting, and 
administrative procedures and controls." 

Coopers and Lybrand 

According to Eugene Freedman, a 
representative of Coopers and Lybrand in 
charge of the firm's investigation into the 
School of Ed, the accounting firm was not 
contracted to complete a full audit per se. 

"That's not what we were hired to do," 
Freedman said. Instead, he termed the in- 
vestigation a "special project." 

Although Freedman said he was "bound 
by the cannon of ethics of his profession" 
not to reveal any facts concerning their 
investigation at this time, he did say that the 
"special project" was "in process towards 
final stages" although a completed report 
cannot be expected "at least until after the 
4th of July, and probably later." 

Once Coopers and Lybrand completes 
their project, a report will be sent directly to 
president Wood, Chancellor Bromery, and 
other administrative officials for their review, 
at which time, at the discretion of the ad- 
ministrators, it will probably be made public, 
according to Freedman. 

Also, in March, the federal grand jury 
issued a subpoena to Treasurer Johnson, 
which he complied with, which essentially 
"froze" records covering at least $15 million 
in federal grants administered by the School 
of Ed. 



No Comment 

Richard Backman, asst. to the U.S. At- 
torney General, said that due to the legalities 
involved, at this time, he was unable to give 
any information concerning the progress of 
the grand jury's pending investigation into 
federal grants administered by the School of 
Ed. 

The grnd jury's probe is expected to take 
"some time" due to the volume and com- 
plexity of the material, according to U.S. 
Atty. James Gabriel. 

The only committee to hand down a 
finalized report is the Faculty Senate Ad Hoc 
Committee from within the University. 

The Committee met formally for seven all- 
day and ten half-day sessions, at the end of 
which time they filed their report which listed 
ten recommendations for the School. 

The Committee also reported that 
"professional training" is not the basis of 
School of Ed programs and this accounts for 
the governing and program weaknesses 
within the School. 

"If the essential function of any academic 
unit of a University is the professional 
training of its students, then the only 
meaningful basis for social organization is 
one rooted in the training function. This is 
decidedly not the base of the current 
organization of the School of Education and 
is at the heart of the school's current 
weakness in terms of both governance and 
of program," the document states. 

Whether the other teams investigating the 
School of Ed find or conclude similar areas 
for improvement or illegal activity remains to 
be seen. Whether or not the School of Ed 
follows the Fac-Sen's ten recommendations 
also remain to be seen. 



Student Union Laundry room 
gutted in weekend fire 




By Dan LaBonte 

Sometime between 7:30 p.m. 
and 8:30 p.m. last Saturday night 
smoke filled the lower level of the 
Student Union building, as a fire 
raged within the laundry room in 
the Northwest section of the 
building 



Amherst Fire Dept. Chief John 
Doherty attributed the cause of the 
fire to a faulty radio, however Don 
Witkoski, a spokesman from the 
Campus Center Building 
Operations, said "it's difficult to be 
that definitive, but it does look like 
the cause was electrical." 

The fire was first noticed by 




Officer Mark Fifield of the UMass 
Police Dept. during routine foot 
patrol of the area. Although 
Witkoski said he is still taking in- 
ventory and cannot give an ac- 
curate estimation of the extent of 
the damage, A.F.D. Deputy Chief 
Ziomek estimated the damages at 
"several" thousand dollars. 

Witkoski noted that the heavy 
machines, two large washers and 
dryers, were not critically damaged 
and only sooted. He predicts that 
the machines will be in operation by 
next week. 

The linen, towels, and sheets, 
etc. that were in the laundry room 



at the time of the fire were com- 
pletely ruined, but Witkoski said the 
damage costs won't be that high 
since the machines weren't 
damaged. Much of the cost 
depends on if the electrical wiring 
inside casings within the room's 
structure melted or not, according 
to Witkoski. 

All of the linen that the laundry 
room had taken care of prior to the 
fire will be sent out to area laun 
dramats, according to Witkoski. 
"People we've done business with 
before are letting us use their 
machines for now." he said. 



£<« A worth of bicycle 
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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



EDITORS 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

ADVERTISING 



Dan LaBonte, Debbie Schafer 

Ken Shapiro 

Alan Anastos, Gary Williams 

Peter Birnbaum 



CONTRIBUTORS Walter MItus, Richard Wright, Mike Fay, Bonnie 
Ruth Allen, Ed McCarthy, John McHale, Mike Kneeland, Berta Kun- 
dert, B.J. Roche, Susan Genser, Rob Melacasa, Rebecca Greenberg, 
Tyla Michelove, Mike Kostek, Dave Sokol, E. P. McQuaid, Lisa Sam 
met, Stu Cudlitz, Jaibee. 

Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The staff is 

responsible for its content and no faculty member or administrator 

reads it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. Unsigned 

editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not necessarily 

eflect the views of the student body, faculty, or administration. Signed 

ditorials, columns, reviews, cartoons, and letters represent the per 

)nal views of the authors. 

The office of the Massachusetts Summer Collegian is on the second 
floor of the Student Union on the campus of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 01002, telephone: 545 1982. 




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UMa$$ Budget eut$ 

Where has all 
the money gone 



? 



By Richard Wright 

While the powers to be play havoc with 
the University's budget in Boston, most of 
the UMass students are struggling with 
finding summer jobs or passively 
relinquishing any concern over the fate of 
UMass at the hands of a cost-conscious 
Governor in the State House. 

Most of the students that is, but not all of 
them. For quietly, as the oppressive heat of 
summer beats down on the Amherst 
campus, some students are continuing the 
struggle that brought over 2,500 students to 
such a fever that they crammed the Student 
Union ballroom to spar with the Governor 
himself over the issue of cutbacks in the 
UMass budget for the coming year. 

A fever that brought nearly 10,000 to vote 
in favor of a moratorium on classes for two 
days last April as a demonstration of their 
solidarity in disapproval over proposed 
budget cuts of 10 per cent by the Governor 
that threatened to seriously curtail certain 
student programs and services. 

With the summer months there 
traditionally comes the courage on the part 
of University administrators to levee changes 
that would stir the anger of students in a 
most visable way had they been suggested 
or moved on during the academic year. But 
this year an interesting twist is developing. 
Instead of the students cringing at the hands 
of an administration slipping offensive rules 
into the works while the students aren't 
around to protest, the administration finds 
itself locked in mortal combat with a 
Governor bent on severing its lifeline and in 
an uneasy alliance with the students who 
have committed themselves to fighting the 
budget cuts with every tactic available. 

This uneasy partnership is sealed in the 
mutual fear that the Governor's proposed 
budget cuts will mean serious curtailments in 
University programs and student services 
which are necessary and are inextricably 
intertwined. 

Among those students working during the 
summer to effect an organized response by 
students to the proposed cuts is Jon Hite, 
speaker of the Student Senate. Along with 
Kenneth Somers, chairperson of the Rents 
and Fees committee of the Student Senate, 



Hite and other interested students are 
working behind the scenes to maintain the 
student position during the give and take 
sessions continuing through the summer. 

Last Thursday Hite and Henry Ragin of the 
Student Government Association's 
President's office were in Boston in the 
offices of the University President Robert W. 
Wood to discuss the budget situation. 

They met with Joseph Cass and Judith 
Gill, legislative liason people for Wood, to 
relay the concerns of Amherst campus 
students and to "concentrate on how 
students could be of some assistance to help 
fight for the Universities budget", said Hite 
after the meeting. 

"It appears the Governor's alledged dislike 
for President Wood is being taken out on 
30,000 students who attend the University of 
Massachusetts," said Hite. 

Hite said Governor Michael Dukakis has 
demonstrated his dislike for President Wood 
with some cutting remarks at the summit 
conference in Charleston last April. 




I he Governor nas instructed all of the 
departments in the government to im- 
plement plans for a 10 per cent in their 
budget requests. So far they have been 
unable to do so according to Hite. "A 10 per 
cent across the board cut is unfeasable and 
unrealistic", said Hite. 



of the 28 state institutions of higher education only 
two are facing budget cuts recommended by Dukakis. 
BCC faces a $25,000 cut... UMass - $37.5 million. 



"If you're going to talk about cutting from 
everything — that's understandable — if 
you've got a deficit then fine - but if you say 
because I don't like the boss I'm going to cut 
you, that doesn't make any sense," said Hite 
about the Governor's proposed UMass cuts. 

Recent press reports have said of the 28 
state institutions of higher education only 
two are facing cuts recommended by 
Dukakis. Berkshire Community College faces 
a cut of $25,000 and UMass faces a cut of 
$37.5 million off the total proposed budget, 
according to Hite. 

"A cut of that size is staggering", said 
Hite. 



According to budget information collected 
by the Collegian the Governor has recom- 
mended that the monies for operating the 
Welfare department be increased from $57.3 
million to $69.3 million. This is not funds for 
benefits, rather, simply for running the 
department. 

The Secretary of Education has been 
recommended to receive an increase in 
administrative funding from $280,000 to 
$449,000 for the coming year. 

These increases come at the same time a 
decrease from $1.47 million to $665,873 has 
been recommended by Dukakis for the 
running of President Wood's office in 



Boston. 

"These increases are staggering when you 
look at what he (Dukakis) has done to 
Wood's office," said Hite. 

"I don't expect the students to cover 
Wood's ass - we're not going to fight this 
cut for Wood - we're not going to fight this 
cut for Bromery. As far as I'm concerned 
we're going to do this in a ^ofessional way 
in the students interest", said Hite. 

"On Sunday I'm going to ask the 
executive committee of the Student Senate 
for $1,000 to start an all-out mailing cam- 
paign to every student explaining what's 
happened since they left this Spring," said 

Hite. 

Hite said the letter campaign will explain 
how the cuts will affect the students and will 
ask them to all write letters to their 
representatives and senators in the state 
legislature voicing their opposition to the 
proposed 10 per cent cuts recommended by 
Dukakis. 

"We will ask them to have their parents do 
the same", added Hite. 

Hite said, "If legislators don't receive 
anything then they don't know what their 
constituents want". 

"We'll also be writing letters to 
newspapers in the Boston area", said Hite. 
"We're going to have the most efficient and 
up-to-date system for knowing where 
students live, who their representatives are, 
continued on page 15 



WMUA 
on the air, 
in the money 

By Mike Fay 

Summer salary funding for radio station 
WMUA, the voice of UMass, was approved 
Monday by the Summer Activities Com- 
mittee, (SAC), in a unanimous 8-0 vote. 

SAC staffer Bill Hasson said yesterday, 
"I'm pretty sure they're (WMUA) going to 
accept it (the funding)." Hasson said only 
the approval of WMUA station manager 
Marc Berman is needed to finalize the 
funding decision. 

Hasson said if WMUA approves the SAC 
funding recommendation, RSO business 
manager, Armand Demers, can process the 

funds. 

Marc Berman is now reviewing the SAC 
recommendation. 

Hasson explained that a rush of students 
registering on the first day of summer classes 
enabled SAC to allocate salary funding for 
WMUA. A total of 400 new students 
registered June 24, the first day of school, to 
bring the ssmmer enrollment to. 2,300 
students. 

Hasson i-aid the SAC recommendation 
would pay tor 10 full-time positions at the 
award winning radio station. Each position 
would draw $60 a week. 

Funding would cover a period of 8 weeks, 
from June 24 to August 16. 

But Hasson explained that back pay 
funding would be drawn from SATF funds. 
This funding would pay for the period 
beginning June 24 and ending July 4. 
WMUA staffers worked without pay during 
that period to keep the staion on the air. 




SaSyfunding tor WMUA by the Summer Activities Committee will provide 
pay for 10 full-time positions at the award winning radio station. 



to replace Dean 

New ORL 
director 
chosen 



By Walter Mitus 

Joel Rudy has accepted the position as 
new director of the office of Residential Life 
(ORL), Vice-Chancellor Robert Gage an- 
nounced. He begins work on August 15th, 
according to Fred Preston, a member of the 
search committee composed of students and 
administrative staff members. 

Mr. Rudy, Who is working on his PhD in 
Sociology, is presently the Dean for Student 
Residence Life at Kent State University in 
Ohio where he serves 20,000 students with a 
$8 million budget. Besides being a candidate 
for director of ORL, he was considering an 
offer for residential life director in another 
institution as well as a vice-president position 
at Kent State. 

While his wife, Marlene, was looking at 
Amherst, he was meeing with Dr. Gage and 
Chancellor Randolph -Bromery. Rudy said he 
was "impressed by the positive feelings at 
UMass and the way students handled their 
first town meeting, which I attended." He 
sees "a university as a place where ad- 
ministrators and students are in it together 
for the education of the whole person." 

"Residential life could be a lot closer to 
academic life, not just a roof over our heads 
and food in our stomachs," according to 
Rudy. "Dorms should be built for 
educational purposes. They have a dual 
commitment to the investors as well as the 
students who invest their futures," he 
continued. 

continued on page 15 






MHMHMMHB]' 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 9. lOTt 



Venceremos Brigade 

an experience to initiate US-Cuban related programs 



WEDNESDAY. JULY 9, 1975, 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



The Venceremos Brigade is a 
national educational project which 
affords white, Black, Puerto Rica, i, 
Chicano, Asian, Latino progressive 
workers and students a chance to 
work and travel throughout Cuba 
for two and a half months This 
past March, five University of 
Mass. students travelled to Cuba a. 
members of the Venceremos 
Brigade. 

In the United States, the Brigade 
provides activities and educationals 
in an effort to provide information 
to the U.S. public and to initiate 
programs in order to bring about a 
final hrlt of the U.S. enforced 
blockade in Cuba. 

This year the members of the 



all contributing to the building of 
their country; working to provide 
adequate housing for all, organizing 
their economy to provide free 
education and medical care for all; 
and ridding their nation of all 
conditions of exploitation, racism, 
ind male chavinism." 

When the people from the 
Western Mass Regional returned to 
the United States, they, as the 
Brigade nationally, started to 
prepare for programs set for July 
26, which this year marks the 22nd 
anniversary of the attack on the 
Moncada Garrison, the first military 
attack launched against the Batista 
dictatorship. 

The focal point of the July 26th 



three days. A full schedule of these 
events will be available at the 
showina of Exdo Cuba. 

Over the past two years, 
celebrations of July 26th, initiated 
by the Venceremous Brigade as 
well as other progressive peoples 
and organizations, have been held 






Expo Cuba, a pictoral essay of the history and advances of the 
Cuban revolution, will be on display from July 14-16 in room 163 of 
the Campus Center. 



Brigade participated in construction 
of housing in the community of 
Ariguar.abo and in the construction 
of a service center (recreational, 
health, and retail facilities) in the 
town of Los Naranjos. 

"For those who v.*e.it on the 
Brigade", said Buffy Wei ,ian, one 
of the five UMass stucents who 
took part in the experience, "Cuba 
is a concrete example of socialism 
at work, where men and women are 



activities this year is the projected 
visit of Melba Hernandez at the July 
26th event in New York City. This 
indeed historic since it is the first 
time that an invitation has been 
extended to a representative of the 
Cuban people to speak to North 
Americans on the Cuban 
revolution. As a heroine of the 
Attack on the Moncada Garrison on 
July 26th of 1953, and the head of 
Cuba's committee of Solidarity 



with the Peoples of Vietnam, 

Cambodia, and Laos, Melba 

Hernandez can ring the reality of 

the Cuban revolution to us. The 

New York event will also involve 

films, exhibits, and discussions. 

Also planned is an evening in 

solidarity with the struggle for 

independence of Puerto Rico. This throughout the United States. 

event will include performances by 

outstanding groups from Puerto 

Rico. 

Here in Western Mass. and the 
Hartford, Connecticut area ac- 
tivities are also planned around July 
26th for "A People's Salute to 
Cuba." There are three basic and 
interwoven themes for the activities 
and those throughout the U.S. 1 ) A 
contrast of Cuba's unshakeable 
Donds of solidarity and complete 
identification with the struggles for 
liberation of peoples — with the 
interventions and aggression and 
limitless maneuvers of U.S. im- 
perialism to rob the peoples of 
Africa, Southeast Asia, Latin 
America, and the Middle East of 
their freedom and right to life and 
self determination. 2) A contrast of 
the current domestic situation in 
Cuba and in the U.S. 3) The U.S. 
progressive people and their 
movements in solidarity with the 
liberation of the peoples of Africa, 
Asia, and Latin America. This Cuba 
is a country of full employment, 
free education, and medical care; a 
country where there is full racial 
equality; a country where workers 
control production; a country 
where the "new woman" is 
emerging; a country where people 
have the power to determine their 
own destiny, free from foreign 
intervention or domestic tyrants. 
Here at the Universif,, Expo 
Cuba, a pictoral essay of the history 
and advances of the Cuban 
revolution, wilK be on display from 
July 14-16, Monday through 
Wednesday, in room 163 of the 
Campus Center, from 10 a.m. to 10 
p.m. 

In addition to the exhibit there 
will be music and films during the 



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C TS d J t UniOn someone you can bank on 



By Bunnie Ruth Allen 

The UMass Student Fe 
Credit Union, nearing its loumr 
month of operation, has high hopes 
for its future activities. 

While continuing to offer high 
interest savings, low interest loans, 
and food stamp sales, the credit 
union is also working on offering to 
students insurance, a travel 
agency-tour program and checking 
accounts, giving all its volunteer 
workers credits through the school 
of business administration, 
becoming departmentalized, and 
becoming computerized. 

"But we still want to emphasize 
the credit union's savings," said 
Peter Birnbaum, the presient of the 
union. 

The union's savings account 
offer 5Vi per cent interest paid 
quarterly to all students registered 
in the university, including con- 
tinuing education students. 
Savings can be automatic for 
university employees through the 
payroll deduction plan starting in 
September. Withdrawals can be 
made in minutes. The money that 
students invest goes into either 
loans or government bonds; none is 
invested in commercial stock. All 
savirjgs are insured up to $40,000 
per account. 

Interest on loans taken from the 
credit union is charged only on the 
unpaid balance at the rate of 1 per 
cent a month or y* per cent on a 
share account secured loan. Low 
loan interest with high interest 



savings is available to students 
because the union is a non-profit 
organization with an all-volunteer 
staff. Although the length of time 
allowed for students to pay back 




Peter Birnbaum 

the loan depends upon the in- 
dividual, one year is the average 
amount of time allowed. Loan 
protection and passbook insurance 
is free with all loans. 

Food stamp sales are offered to 
anyone enrolled in the food stamp 
program, not just students. A 
maximum of thirty days is promised 
for eligible for individuals to get on 
the program by the Mass. Dept. of 



Welfare. 

The idea of forming a credit 
union was first discussed three 
years ago. Last year the student 
organization project did some 
research on how such a union 
could be formed. In the fall, 
members of the Credit Union 
Association did more research, 
including a student survey in which 
83 per cent of the students sur- 
veyed indicated that they were in 
favor of the credit union, showing 
the federal government that there 
was sufficient student interest and 
income (the average value of 
pledges by the students surveyed 
was $185). 

With the charter from the 
National Credit Union Ad- 
ministration, an agency of the 
federal government, and financial 
backing from the student govern- 
ment, including area governments 
and graduate senate, the union was 
founded on March 11. 

To date, the union, logarith- 
mically, has 175 members and 
$32,000 in assets. $3,200 has been 
allocated by the student govern- 
ment to provide "for special 
equipment and for computer 
programming." 

The credit union, located in room 
166 in the basement of the campus 
center, will be open throughout the 
summer on Tuesday and Friday 
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. A minimum 
deposit of $5 plus a 50 cents initial 
membership fee will make any 
registered student a member." 








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P r q c h pp| PI a 9U,de t0 9>ve rresnmen 

" a foothold on the 

Orientation uMasssoaa/hm 



By John McHale 

Remember when you got your 
first in-depth look at UMass? I 
mean actually getting to stay 
overnight in a dorm, going to 
meetings (just like classes) and 
even taking tests. Well, that's what 
freshman orientation this summer is 
all about. There are 3,600 frosh and 
2,000 transfer students coming here 
to get an overview of the campus 
and its workings. Perhaps even 
more important, they'll have made 
some "instant friends" this 
summer, giving them a foothold on 
the social hill that looms in the fall. 
According to Sarah Hamilton, 
Director of New Students 
Programs, the sessions prepare the 
average incoming freshman for 
his— her first week up here in the 
fall. "Anything over that would be 
unrealistic," she said, and several of 
her counselors agreed with her. 

Preparation for the newcomers 
to the large campus at Amherst 
begins well ahead of time. By early 
spring, 30 counselors have been 
selected from over 250 applicants. 
Later in the spring, Hamilton 
supervises four three-hour training 
sessions and another fuli school 
week of briefing and readying the 
counselors for their summer jobs. 
Also there is on-going correctional 
action possible, according to one 
counselor, who said the entire staff 
meets two times each week of the 
summer session to iron out 
problems. 

This staff "represents all the 
schools and colleges and all living 
areas including Greeks," said 
Hamilton. "I try to get 15 men and 
15 women, though this year we 
have a few more of the latter. 
They're well-trained and they know 
what the program's goals are. Most 
important, I'm sure that none of 
them are acting to defeat the 
program. They work very closely 
with the advising deans of the 
various schools." 

The newcomers have their 1,0. 
pictures taken, choose what area 
they wish to reside in, and get to 
meet a faculty advisor. Each fresh- 
man gets to discuss with this 




person, on a one-to-one basis, 
his— her needs, goals and possible 
courses to take. After this con- 
sultation and perhaps further 
discussion with one of the student 
counselors, everyone pre-registers. 

"Included in the schedule for 
each session are advanced 
placement tests in Math, Zoology, 
Languages, and the new Rhetoric 
Part I, for those students who wish 
to take them," said Hamilton. 

The program, which began in 
June, will continue through the 
summer with ten freshmen 
sessions. One session will last only 
one and a half days and is designed 
for people with limited time, who 
plan to live off campus, who may 
be vets, or who may be married. 
The other nine sessions last the 
standard two and a half days. There 
is also one special session for the 
350 students entering Stockbridge, 
also lasting two and a half days. 

Later in the summer starting 
about July 20, transfer students will 
be handled in five additional 
sessions, three of which will last 
two days, the other two being one- 
day affairs. 

Quite a bit is being done to keep 
the students happy, busy, and 
learning. "We have a new slide- 
tape show on living options 
produced by John McCarthy of the 




*l also missed my Math placement tests this morning. 
Frosh begins UMass with a game of volleyball in the Quad. 



Every 



University Photo Center," Hamilton 
said. 

Involvement of the parents of the 
newcomers is stressed. They are 
welcome to attend meetings, take 
campus tours, and ask the 
counselors questions. There is no 
parent program for the short 
sessions, however. 

Other fairly new ideas which 
seem quite promising are two 
electives: Projects Freshstart and 
Adventure. 

Project Freshstart is headed by 
Jean Moss for interested and 
randomly selected Arts and 
Sciences majors. Its purpose is to 
explore ways that an' individual's 
strengths can held solve problems 
of indecision, to find him — herself 
and to thus gain a clearer pers- 
pective of goals. Freshstart is run 
by some of the same 30 counselors 
who comprise the Student 
Development Center Staff. 

Project Adventure is part of a 
pilot program. The aim here is to 
help freshmen to get to know other 
people quickly and to know their 
personal strengths. Cooperation 
and teamwork are stressed in a 
non-threatening type situation. 
Here there are two counselors per 
group of 15, serving as facilitators 
and spotters. 

With all the painstaking care and 
effort put into this summer program 
it would seem that the people for 
whom it works should be well- 
satisfied. This was apparently the 
case last summer, as evaluation and 
improvement continue through 
feedback from the students who 
have completed the orientation. 
The figures on different areas were 
rated "very good", indicative of 
total success by Hamilton and her 
counselors in satisfying the 
newcomers' wants, needs, and 
questions. 

The Collegian talked with a 
number of frosh undergoing the 
orientation. Of the dozen or so 
spoken with, not one was 
dissatisfied at all. There were a few 
gripes, however, about such things 
as the food, weather, free time, 
curfew, etc., but generally they 
were a satisfied group. 

Counselors interviewed seemed 
very loya! to the program and 
exhibited pride and enjoyment in 
their work. When pressed to come 
up with any improvements they felt 
could be made the only areas 
mentioned were possible increases 
in staff number, more rainy day 
programming, better faculty advice 
in some areas, Project Adventure 
expansion, and more programming 
for women. 

Financing of the 1975 summer 
counseling program is done wholly 
through the use of the $30 each 
student pays. Counselors receive 
about $580 plus room and board for 
their eight-week stint. 



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thf MASSACHUSETTS SUMMf" COt LEGIAN 



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WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1975 



Sports 



WFONESDAY. JULY 9, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Wherever Chuck wants me" 



By Mike Kneeland 

I knew something was strange 
when the lady behind the food 
counter looked at all 140 lbs. of me 
and asked with stars in her eyes, 
"And what position do you play?" 

It was my first year covering the 
New England Patriots summer 
camp here and Amherst seemed to 
become a stage for a Marx 
Brother's movie. 

Take Bob "Harpo" Gladieux. He 
is, according to former Patriot Tom 
Beer, a recent winner of the Annual 
New England Berry Festival. The 



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Laundry facilities wall located 

Safe playground for children 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
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Connecticut 

Resident Superintendent responsible for all 
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Brandywine Drive 

Amherst 
549-0600 




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potato, and bread. 




Mountain Farms Mall 
Rte. 9 Hadley 




players, it seems, develop pimples 
on their over-sized fannies from 
sweat and abrasion. The con- 
testants are judged by the number 
of pimples according to three 
classes: Most Berries, Largest 
Berries, and Most Improved 
Berries. 

With all the enthusiasm of a roller 
derby color man, Beer says, "A guy 
could have a baby-smooth bum one 
day and the next day he'd look like 
he'd been hit with birdshot at point- 
blank range." 

Then there was John Smith, the 
school teacher from England. He 



■ 



Commentary 



m 



thought he had to kickoff as soon 
as the official blew his whistle, and 
as a result flubbed a few kicks. 

That may have been em- 
barrassing when it appeared in the 
papers, but Smith soon outdid 
himself. During a practice drill he 
ran on the field to kick a field goal... 
without his helmet. Running off the 
field after the play he looked at a 
number of writers and said — only 
as an Englishman could say it — "I 
forgot my bonnet." His teammates 
were embarrassed only as football 
players could be embarrassed. 

The press was zany too. Some of 
the writers knew that kicker Jeff 
White — who was later cut — had 
a reverance toward older women, 
treating them with the respect any 
mother would be proud of. 

With White nearby, some of the 
writers started telling each other, in 
loud voices, how there's nothing 
like making it with a woman in her 
60s. White could not ignore them 
too long. 

"Listen you guys have no respect 
for the elderly," he said with a stern 



face. 

"Watsamatter, Jeff? Haven't you 
ever done it with an old lady... they 
can't get pregnant you know." 

White left huffing and puffing 
while the writers roared and roared 

The local women even joined the 
zany act here. Beer was not far 
from the truth when he wrote in 
Sunday's Fools: "What a man 
won't do when he's desperate." 

Chequers, ot course, is the Pats' 
watering hole and every jock queen 
within 50 miles knows it. But, Beer 
later continued, "even the porcine 
types were smart enough to know 
that they were the only females 
around, and they'd play hard to 
qet." 

He was right. I watched at least 
10 players make a pass at one 
woman. No dice. The wo*r»an gave 
them no attention accept a slight 
smile. This went on for nearly three 
hours. 

When the players had to leave at 
11, you might have thought they 
were the Los Angeles Rams. What 
about the woman? After putting 
down all those players, some of 
which were stars, she proceeded to 
brag about it for the next three 
times I saw her with friends. In 
short, she applied to Radcliffe to 
reject the acceptance. 

The townspeople went nuts too. 
Pipe-smoking professors were like 
kids when a Patriot walked by. 
Dante to Vataha. And next week 
it's all going to start again. But this 
will be my second year on the job 
and I've worked hard in the off 
season and know what to expect. 

So when that lady behind the 
food counter looks at me in the 
player's chow line and asks what 
position I play, I'll look down at my 
170 lb. berried body and say, 
"Wherever Chuck wants me." 



CEEB: 



only one 
contributing 
factor 



By Berta Kundert 



CEEB test scores (College Entrance Examination Boards), high school 
rank, as well as the applicant's outside activities and special interests are 
determining factors in whether an applying undergraduate is accepted or 
rejected at UMass. 

Director of admissions Robert Doolan dismissed the criticism that 
computers are used in admissions decision-making. Doolan explained that 
the computer is an important organization tool in the compilation of data 
but it is the administrators themselves who weigh each applicant's records. 

"The criteria changes from year to year," Doolan added. "If more 
students apply, the screening is naturally tighter and only the better 
students qet in." 

The class of 78 received a median score of 529 on the verbal section of 
the CEEB test and a 565 on the math section. CEEB tests are on a scale ot 
200 points to 800 points which is the maximum. 

William Tunis, Dean of admissions and records doesn't predict any great 
variation in the CEEB test scores of the class of '79 in spite of nationally 
lower CEEB scores. 

Tunis feels that CEEB scores are meaningless unless they are viewed 
along with the student's secondary school record. "If a student is in the 
upper 10 per cent in class rank at a difficult high school, he might be ac 
cepted at UMass in spite of low CEEB test scores," Tunis said. 

The "difficulty" of the high school is determined to some degree by the 
size of the school. The competition factor in larger high schools affects the 
class rank scale. 

Administrators in charge of admissions also visit high schools in the 
state to determine the standards of the various schools. 

A statistical profile is issued each year summarizing CEEB scores and 
high school rank of applying undergraduates. The profile divides medians 
of scores into several categories. One such category distinguishes between 
the applicants, the accepted students, and those students which entered 
UMass. 

Another category in the profile differentiates between instate and out- 
of-state applicants. A third category separates the medians of scores 
between the various colleges on campus. 

According to Doolan, there is always a disparity between the amount of 
students accepted and the amount of students which decide to enter 
whether due to financial problems, sudden illness, or other reasons. 

"It's a challenge to accept as many applications as possible without 
knowing how many students will actually enter. We won't know the actual 
enrollment for the Fall of '75 until the month of October," Doolan ex 
plained. 



I. llC What a way to get around 

Bicycle 

Collective 



By B.J. Roche 

It's summertime in Amherst and 
cars and buses have been traded in 
for the bicycle as a mode of 
transportation. Bikes offer the 
double advantage of physical and 
economic well being when the 
weather is right and gas costs are 
rising. But maintenance of a bicycle 
can be comparatively expensive in 
this area. The Bicycle Collective 



offers the double advantage of 
contributing to a community co- 
operative as well as gaining 
knowledge in bicycle repair and 
maintenance. 

The Collective is run by four 
people, Randy, Jim, Carolyn and 
Angie, out of a large old garage 
located at 51 South Prospect 
Street, and is a "worker's collective 
who repair bicycles and try to teach 




bike repairs in a non-oppressive 
way." How can bike repair be an 
oppressive situation? Randy ex- 
plained. "There is often a con- 
descending attitude on the part of 
mechanics which make people feel 
imcompetent about their abilities. 
We try to demystify bicycle repair 
and make people feel comfortable 
about learning how to take care of 
bicycles." 

The Collective, started in April of 
1974, is an outgrowth of a similar 
collective in Cambridge. The 
feedback from patrons has been 
good, as the co-op serves as a 
school as well as a shop. Patrons 
can get advice on what kind of 
bicycle to buy for their particular 
needs. The advantage is that the 
Collective does not sell bicycles, so 
the concern is with people, not 
profits. Classes are given every 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 
at 4 in the afternoon at the garage. 
The one session, 1 % classes ex- 
plore such topics as How to Buy a 
Bicycle and Bicycle Maintenance. 
For those wishing to repair bicvcles. 




the Collective will lend the tools and 
garage space, as well as the 
mechanical know how to get the 
job done. And for those who wish 
it, the members of the Collective 
also do repairs on their own. All 
services are provided for nominal 
fees. 

In addition to repairs, the 
Collective also sells parts, and one 
of its projects is a "Parts Fund," 
which, through using many small 
loans from members of the 
community, will seek to buy and 
sell oarts at low nrirp«s The reason 



for such a funu is twofold: to 
provide a community base for the 
Collective as well as eliminating 
profits. By borrowing money from 
non-institutional sources, the 
Collective is working within a self 
dependent context. 

The Bicycle Collective is open 
Monday through Saturday, and 
welcomes any one wishing to learn 
about his or her bicycle. A sharing 
of energy as well as knowledge is 
its goal, and the Collective is 
making rapid progress. 



Two co-op 
reparations. 



members work together on some basic cycle 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1975 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1975 



: ; MUSIC — 

Local , Concerts 



(July 9-15) 






What's Coin ' On 



Consort in concert 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Clean Living — Supermarket (Springfield), July 11, 12. 

Deadly Nightshade — Rusty Nail (Sunderland), July 9. 

Fat - Rusty Nail, July 10-13. 

Roomful! Of Blues - Lazy River (Northampton), July 10-12. 

Paul Geremia — Chelsea House Cafe and Folklore Center (W. Brat- 
tleboro, VO. July 11,12. 

Some of My Best Friends - Deadly Nightshade — Shea's Grove 
(Chicopee), July 11,12. 

Lilith - Bernardston km (Bernardston), July 11. 

Deadly Nightshade — Bernardston Inn, July 10. 

Orleans - Shaboo Inn (WHIimantlc, CO, July 12. 

Homecookin' - T.O.C. (UMass), July 10-12. 

Jac Veronesiwith Tom McNamera — Lazy River, July 15. 

Handpicked with Bruce Mac Kay - Country House (Hatfield), July 10, 
11. 

Radio King and His Court of Rhythm - 5th Alarm (Springfield), July 10 
12. 

Some of My Best Friends — Supermarket, July 15. 

Johnny Walker Blues Band — Supermarket, July 9, 10. 

Harpo 8- Friends — Lakeview Inn (South wick), July 9-13. 

Doctors — Lazy River, July 9. 

Beggar's Opera - Steak Out, July 9-12. 

Dark Horse - Crystal Park (Palmer), July 1 1, 12. 

Outrage - 4 Leaf Window < New Salem), July 10-13. 

Beggar's Opera — Rusty Nail, July 15. 

Truk — Lakeview Inn, July 15.. 

Discos: 

Rachid's (Hadley) — Nightly until 1 a.m. 

Maxwell's (Hadley) - Open nightly, Jazz Night every Sunday. 

Top of The Campus (UMass) — Disco Night every Wednesday. 
| Dial Tone Lounge (Hatfield) — Nightly until 1 a.m. 

Poor Richard's III (Amherst) — Open nightly except Monday. 
I September's (Chicopee) — Open Nightly. 

Fifth Alarm (Springfield) - Disco Nights: July 9, 14, 15. 



( T indicates tix on sale at Ticketron in CC Hotel Lobby) 



UMASS 

Paul Winter Consort - July 10, Campus Center Concourse at 12 noon, 
and 8 p.m. on Metawampe Lawn (free). 



SPRINGFIELD 
Elvis Presley - July 14 & 15, Civic Center (sold out). 
U.S. Accordian Championship Ft Festival - July 9-11, Civic Center. 
Earth, Wind & Fire - July 22, Civic Center T. 
The Osmonds - Munch — Aug. 7, Civic Center T. 
Miss World U.S.A. Pagent (with Bob Hope) - Aug. 17, Civic Center 

LENOX, Mass. (Musiclnn) 
—all shows 7 
Two Generations ofBrubeck ■ Sky King - July 12, 5 p.m. 
Joan Baez — July 19. 

Bruce Springsteen Ft The E Street Band - Jury 23. 
Bonnie Raitt — Aug. 9. 
Jerry Jeff Walker - Aug. 16. 
New Riders Of The Purple Sage - Aug. 30. 



LENOX, Mass. (Tanglewood) 
— all shows 7 
Roberta Flack - Blood, Sweat Ft Tears — July 15. 
James Taylor - Emmylou Harris — July 22. 
Judy Collins - Liv Taylor — July 29. 
Linda Ronstadt - Leo Kottke - Aug. 26. 
David Crosby Ft Graham Nesh - Aug. 29. 
Helen Reddy - Aug. 30. 



The Paul Winter Consort will be per- 
forming at UMass this Thursday, July 10. At 
noon, the Consort will play an hour of music 
with acoustic instruments of the Campus 
Center Concourse. At 8:00 p.m. they will 
present a free concert on Metawampe Lawn 
with their full compliment of instruments 
from "every part of Earth." 

The Winter Consort has evolved over the 
past eight years to its present five musicians 
and over two dozen separate instruments. 

Paul Winter, the group's leader, organized 
his first ensemble at the age of twelve. In 
1962, a later group, the Paul Winter Sextet, 
became the first group ever to play a jazz 
concert at the White House. 

The present Winter Consort features 
Winter on Saxophone, David Darling on cello 



and vocals, Robert Chappel on keyboards 
and Tigger Benford and Ben Carrie) on 
percussion. 

The Consort tours with a wide range of in- 
struments including electric cello, harp- 
sichord, Rodgers Touring Organ, kettle 
drums, bass marimba, amadinda-xylophone, 
congas, Wuhan gong and antique cymbals. 

The Consort, according to Joseph 
McLellan of the Washington Post, "has 
harnessed the power of amplification and put 
it at the service of musical form, imagination 
and fascinating instrumental color." 

Bring a blanket for seating at the evening 
performance on Metawampe Lawn. In case 
of rain, Winter Consort will move to the Fine 
Arts Center Concert Hall. 



Bicentennial Lecturer 





Sheehan's Reel played ttad««ion«l Irish Music in the Campus Center Concourse last Thursday, as 
nembers of the audience danced .ilong 



Films 

this week 

"THE KING OF MARVIN 
GARDENS" with Jack Nicholson 
- Wednesday, July 9, 8:00 p.m. 
SUB. 

The story of a wheeler dealer in 
real estate — involved in a quick 
"get rich" scheme that takes us on 
a zany chase through the board- 
walks of Atlantic City. 103 minutes. 

"AN AUTUMN AFTERNOON" by 
Uasu/iro Osu — Wednesday, July 
16, 8:00 p.m. CC Auditorium. 

A gentle story about a widower's 
decision to marry off his only 
daughter as he turns a lovingly 
malicious eye on ultra-modern 
Japan. Uasujiro Osu's great 
cinematic fresco which so com- 
pletely captures Japan as it is — a 
quality the Japanese themselves 
acknowledge in calling Osu "the 
most Japanese of all Japanese 
directors." 




"The New Old-Time Religion," the fourth 
in a series of Bicentennial lectures, will be 
presented at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, July 15 in 
he Student Union Colonial Lounge. 

Reverend Frank Dorman, of the United 
Christian Foundation, will discuss the 
relationship between radical religions and 
revolutionary movements. Dorman's lecture 
will include details of the "great awakening 
of 1740," that started in Northampton, and 
its influence on the American revolution. 

Dorman will also comment on the current 
religious and political situation. 

• 

Associated with the United Christian 
Foundation at UMass since 1974, Dorman 
was a pastor in Amherst for several years as 
well as a staff member for the Western 
Massachusetts Clergy and Laity Concerned. 



SU Art Gallery 



"A whole new concept in photography 
exhibits," will be the theme of this summer's 
photo show in the Student Union Gallery. 

Everyone is invited to bring photographs 
to the show's opening night, Sunday, July 13 
between 6:00 and 9:00 p.m. 

According to Joe Kos, gallery director, the 
large wall in the gallery will be covered "floor 
to ceiling and side to side with 



photographs." 

To achieve the giant photo collage, Kos 

will hang any type of photographs that 

people bring in, from family snap-shots to 

professional prints. The photos can be 

ancient, found, recent or cut-up." 

Kos expects to have ladders on hand so 
that visitors can gat a close-up view of all 
the photos. I he exhibit will run through July 



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Amherst 

ANNOUNCES 

New Summer Hours 



10:00-5:30 MON.-FRI. 
9:00-1:00 SAT. 

CLOSED JULY 
4th & 5th 






\ OPEN 





The Paul Winter Consort 



Outdoor Program 

The Outing Club and the Summer Outdoor Program will continue | 
offering activities throughout the summer. For more detailed information 1 
on programs, check the Outing Club» bulletin board beside the Student § 
Union Ballroom. :•:! 

This week's activities: $: 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 9 $ 

Equipment and hiking discussion at 4:00 p.m. Will cover packs, :•: 
sleeping bags, clothing, boots, food and trail hints. Meet in front of the •:• 
Student Union. I 

Softball game at 7:00 p.m. on the field across from Boyden. Everyone :j: 
is welcome. x': 

THURSDAY, JULY JO $ 

Canoe trip on the Connecticut River. Meet at 5:00 p.m. at the Outing ;§ 
Club Canoe Barn. 8 

FRIDAY, JULY 11 % 

Bicycle trip leaving from the front of the Student Union at 3:00 p.m. $ 
Will travel ten miles to Montague and return at 6:00 p.m. Bring a lunch i1 :$ 
desired. i$ 

FRIDAY, JULY 11 through SUNDAY, JULY 13. j| 

Hiking and caving trip to Dorset Mountain, Vermont. Leaves Friday :$ 
afternoon. See the Outing Club bulletin board for details. :*: 

MONDAY, JULY 14. :| 

Bicycle trip at 3:00 p.m. Destination to be determined by group jijrj 
leaders. Trip will be approximately twenty miles. $5 

TUESDAY, JULY 15. jig 

Rock climbing at Rose Ledge, Northfield. Meet at the Campus Center :£: 
Bus Circle at 5:30 p.m. 8: 

r .V. 

Lecture on rock climbing techniques and equipment at 7:30 p.m. in ;:;:j 
Campus Center, room 168. :•$ 



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Cop sees 

the light 

(EARTH NEWS) - A police 
veteran of 19 years here has been 
granted an $800 a month disability 
pension because he says he no 
longer has the ability to shoot a 
man. 

Sergeant Frank Kalafate told the 
Police Retirement Board that for 
the last few years he's been 
agonizing over the possibility that 
he might have to shoot someone in 
the line of duty. The fear became so 
acute, he said, that he developed 
ulcers and had to start seeing a 
psychiatrist. 

"I just couldn't stand it if I had to 
kill a man", said Kalafate. "There's 
nothing worse in the world than to 
kill a man." 

The Board ruled Kalafate 
emotionally disabled and granted 
him a pension. 



press charges" Senator Olver said. 
"If this legislation becomes law, 
judges will have the power to 
exclude irrelevant material about a 
woman's past and the victim's 
privacy will be protected without 
endangering the rights of the 
accused." 

Grad strategy 



Summers bring a misleading 
sense of peace and quiet to 
Amherst. This summer, like others, 
has become a period of intense 
political activity — the ad- 
ministration does not take a 
summer vacation, and the state 
legislature is in the process of 
enacting a crippling budget cut for 
this campus. Graduate students will 
certainly be among those feeling 
the crunch in September — 
unless... 

The officers of the Graduate 



Odd-ball 
Olympics 



Long 



distance 
runaround 



A<J "73 Revised -. .540 Jlnas 



Revised pag« M-58 



i i ■ # 



There will be an Odd-Ball 
Olympic happening at the 
Mountain Farms Mall on July 17, 
18, and 19. 

You can break an already 
established record from the Ginnis 
World Book of Records or you can 
make and break your own record. 
Prizes will be awarded in each 
category. All props, within reason, 
will be furnished by the Mall. 

The Odd-Ball Olympic is totally 
for the benefit of the United Fund. 
Each event or contest will be 
evaluated for an appropriate con- 
tribution to the United Fund. 

All organizations in the area are 
asked to join this drive for the 
United Fund to be held at the 
Mountain Farms Mall. 

If you need any further in- 
formation, please contact Carolyn 
Kennedy at 586-2664. 

Prior sex not 
allowed in 
rape cases 

Legislation to restrict the use of 
testimony on a rape victim's prior 
sexual conduct has passed -the 
Senate and is now headed for the 
house. Co-sponsored by Senator 
John W. Olver (D- Amherst) and 
Senator James A. Kelly (D-Oxford) 
the legislation is aimed at 
preventing the introduction of 
irrelevant testimony about a rape 
victim's prior sexual conduct, 
testimony that is often traumatic 
for the victim. 

"Defense attorneys in rape cases 
have on occasion tried to put the 
victim on trial instead of the ac- 
cused" Senator Olver explained 
"by introducing testimony on the 
victim's prior sexual conduct. Such 
testimony often has no bearing on 
the case at hand but it can 
prejudice a jury and prove very 
difficult for the victim. Often vic- 
tims of rape are reluctant to testify 
because of the possibility of such 
testimony." 

Under the provisions of the Kelly- 
Olver bill evidence of a victim's 
prior sexual conduct would be 
admissable only if such conduct 
involved the defendant or if it might 
explain the source of any physical 
feature or condition of the victim, 
and if the judge determines the 
material is relevant. The judge may 
choose to hear the evidence in his 
chambers in order to decide if it is 
relevant and may be introduced 
into court. 

"Too many women who have 
been victimized by rapists fear 
having their entire past dissected in 
court and therefore choose not to 



One of the single-event 
highlights of this summer's in- 
tramural activities will be held at 
7:00 p.m. as aspiring long distance 
runners compete in cross country 
races. There will be two races, one 
for men and one for women, that 
will be run on the field that 
surrounds Derby Track. 

Entries for this race can be 
submitted up to the time of the 
race. The women's event will be 
one mile and the men's race will be 
1.7 miles. The race will be run at 
6:45 p.m. on Thursday, July 17, not 
on Jury 15 as previously an- 
nounced. Even if your goals are not 
to be the next Frank Shorter or 
Francie LaRue, come on down to 
the track and have a good workout. 




This running keeps your mind off school- 



Student Senate have been con- 
fronting that unless daily. In Boston 
and on campus, groups have been 
meeting to discuss strategies to 
maximize the total budget and the 
process and substance of 
budgetary allocations. It appears 
that graduate assistantships are, in 
light of the hiring freeze, one of the 
most vulnerable accounts. Most 
TA's have not yet signed contracts. 
Graduate students are urged to 
contact the Graduate Senate (CC 
919, 5-0970) for information, and 
more importantly, to establish the 
broad-based participation (Grad. 
Students) will need to ensure our 
survival and future careers. 



Gravity is down 



(EARTH NEWS) - What goes 
up must still come down, but 
scientists have now confirmed that 
things are coming down just a little 
bit slower. 

Researchers at the U.S. Naval 
Observatory here have confirmed 
earlier suspicions that gravity is 
decreasing. That means that 
Newton's famous apple would take 
longer to reach the ground today 
than it did in Newton's time. 

The scientists say that the 
declining force of gravity 
corresponds to the rate at which 
the universe is expanding. As 
gravity declines, the planets move 
farther away from the sun, and the 
moon moves away from the earth. 

But Dr. Thomas Van Flandern of 
the Naval Observatory notes that 
there's no cause for alarm. The 
decline, he says, is so infinitisimal 
that it has to be measured with 
atomic clocks. 

And, it might even be good news 
for weight-watchers. The decline 
means that we're all losing about 
one-millionth of the weight of a 
paper-clip every year. 



The Intramural office reminds all 
those persons who are playing in 
individual sports tournaments 
(tennis, badminton, handball, 
paddleball, squash) to pick up their 
schedules at the office. If you have 
any problems contacting your 
opponents or arranging matches 
notify the IM Office between 8 a.m. 
and 9 p.m. Monday-Friday, or call 
545-2801 or 545-2693. Forfeits 
should be avoided so that these 
round robins may be held suc- 
cessfully. 




Animal public 
sex banned 



(EARTH NEWS) - The cats 
and dogs and horses and cattle in 
and around the Stanfield, Oregon 
farming community are going to 
have to stop doing it in public. The 
Stanfield City Council last week 
voted a ban against all sex acts be- 
tween animals in the public view. 
The ban is a part of a general 
nuisance ordinance passed by the 
council. The ordinance provides 
that the owner of any animal 
caught making it in public will be 
liable for not less than a $15 fine 
and — or two-to-25 days in the 
county jail. 



and Pieces 



Grad 
Employees 
Union?! 



A group of graduate students 
have formed a new organization on 
campus, the Graduate Student 
Employees Organizing Committee 
(GSEOC). The group is in the 
process of contacting fellow 
graduate student employees 
regarding their grievances with 
conditions of employment within 
the University. The final goal is a 
union of graduate student em- 
ployees, including all Teaching 
Assistants and Associates, 
Research and Special Assistants. 
Although there are numerous 
important issues of common 
concern, the news of impending 
budget cuts, which undoubtedly 
will affect T.A.'s, R.A.'s, and S.A.'s 
particularly hard, has provided extra 
momentum to group efforts. 

The G.S.E.O.C. is working 
throughout the summer on a 
number of projects, including 
researching legal issues of 
unionization, obtaining information 
from other graduate employee 
unions, such as those at the 
University of Michigan and the 
University of Wisconsin, and 
developing a program preparatory 
to a discussion among all graduate 
student employees in the fall. In 
working this summer, the 
G.S.E.O.C. has found common 
cause with other campus 
unionizing groups. 

A major meeting will take place 
on July 10, Campus Center Room 
803, from 3-5:00, to introduce more 
graduate student employees to the 
organization and its summer ac- 
tivities. The Committee urges all 
graduate students interested in the 
possibility of unionizing to attend. 
Meetings are regularly held on 
Thursday afternoons at 3 p.m. in 
the Campus Center, usually on the 
eighth floor. Information can also 
be obtained at the G.S.E.O.C. 
office, which is open weekday 
afternoons, and is located on the 
second floor of the Student Union, 
Room 426. The G.S.E.O.C. needs 
all graduate student employees to 
become involved as soon as 
possible-there is a lot of work to be 
done! 

The Graduate Student Em- 
ployees Organizing Committee 
formed recently, after the T.A. 
Organizing Committee was 
dissolved, thus clarifying that its 
concern is not limited to T.A.'s 
alone. 

Oneness, spirit 
in exhibition 

Two Ashfield women, batik artist 
Carol Law and sculptor Elizabeth 
Burger, will present an exhibition ~* 
recent works July 11-30 at tne 
Leverett Craft Center. 

For sculptor Burger, the sense of 
oneness, with the earth and har- 
mony between living things is 
important; for batik artist Law, it is 
man's spirit, which yearns to be 
free but cannot break away from 
the ties of the earth which 
fascinates her. The combination of 
the two views makes an interesting 
and provocative show. 

Ms. Law resigned after five vears 
teaching art in Franklin County 
public schools to devote all her time 
to art. She graduated from 
Massachusetts College of Art, 
Boston, and spent a summer in 
Rome studying print making. The 
following year she studied etching, 
adquatint and lithography at the 
Museum School of Fine Arts, 
Boston. 

Ms. Burger majored in art in 
cclege and spent one year as a 



special student at Massachusetts 
College of Art. She taught pottery 
and sculpture at M.I.T. and the 
Harvard-Radcliffe ceramic studio. 
She has exhibited work at the 
University of Massachusetts. Seven 
of the projected sixteen faces for a 
mural to be placed over the door of 
the store Faces of Earth, in 
Amherst, will be included in the 
show. 




FBI grafting 
Grand Juries? 

Allegations that the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation has been 
abusing the constitutional rights of 
individuals and misusing Grand 
Juries are being investigated by a * 
newly formed Grand Jury In- 
formation Project comprised of 
lawyers and legal workers from 
Western Massachusetts. 

The allegations against the FBI 
stem from research done over the 
last five years by the American Civil 
Liberties Union and the National 
Lawyers Guild. In connection with 
this, a Grand Jury Reform Act has 
been introduced into Congress by 
twenty-four Representatives. 
Additional reports of intimidation, 
illegal gathering of information and 
other abuse of constitutional rights 
has come from attorneys working 
with witnesses called before Grand 
Juries in Lexington, Kentucky and 
New Haven and Hartford Con- 
necticut. 

These three most recent Grand 
Juries have been gathering in- 
formation that would lead to the 
arrest of Katherine Power, charged 
several years ago with armed 
robbery. This has been the reason 



Body work 
workshop 

Everywoman's Center is 
sponsoring a day-long body work 
and movement workshop through 
it's Project Self Series. It will 
provide a day for women to work 
out with their bodies through 
exercise, dance, improvisation, 
massage, yoga, and breathing. An 
important part of this experience 
will be learning various techniques 
so that after the workshop women 
will be equipped to move out on 
their own. Both individual' and 
group work will be encouraged. 

The body work and movement 
workshop is being held Saturday 
July 12, from 9 to 5 at Farley Lodge 
on the UMass campus. The cost is 
$15. Women can register by calling 
Everywoman's Center 545-0883 or 
dropping by the Center, 506 
Goodell. Everywoman's Center 
summer hours are Monday- 
Thursday 11 to 4. 




Baker house 
houses students 



By Rebecca Greenberg 

Many different people are visiting 
the UMass campus this summer. 
Some 1 are here attending con- 
ferences, others are being prepared 
for their first semester here; parents 
are exploring this colossal campus, 
amazed at the size and reputation, 
and others are walking about, 
considering whether they would 
like to come here to further their 
education. 

But among the visitors is a more 
permanent group-students. Varying 
from recent high school graduates 
to middle-aged and up, studies go 
on for this group of approximately 
2500. Many are from the area and 
commute, but to about 170 
students, home is going to be a 
dorm on the hill, Baker. 

For $21.00 a week, Baker is open 
to students wishing to live on 
campus. A friendly atmosphere 
exists in the long corriders, and a 
sense of unity is felt; whether it's 
brushing your teeth next to a 




...and so do these, if only we could catch them. 



given by the FBI for conducting 
recent investigations in the New 
England area, particularly where 
politically active women's and gay 
rights groups exist. 

The Grand Jury Information 
Project's concern is that innocent 
people may face undue harassment 
because they are not aware of their 
legal rights when questioned by the 
FBI or called before a Grand Jury, 
and that the FBI is using its pursuit 
of fugitives as an excuse to gather 
detailed information on all 
politically active people. Resource 
material on recent cases and ad- 
ditional information is available 
weekdays from the Grand Jury 
Information Project, 25 Main St., 
Northampton MA 01060, call (413) 
586-4327. 



Womb 



music 
booms 

(EARTH NEWS) - Capitol 
Records is rush-releasing an 
unusual new "live" album titled 
"Lullaby From the Womb." The 
album was recorded inside a 



pregnant mother's womb with an 
eight-milimeter microphone. 

The resulting music is simply the 
sound of a mother's heartbeat, as 
heard from the wor b by an unborn 
child. 

The record is the orainchild of Dr. 
Hajime Murooka of the Nippon 
Medical University in Tokyo. 
Murooka recorded the album 
himself, using an eight-month 
pregnant woman as his star. 

He tested the record upon 550 
noisy infants at his hospital. Upon 
hearing "Lullaby From the Womb," 
402 of the babies stopped crying 
within one minute, and 163 of them 
fell asleep. 

Murooka first released the album 
in Japan, where it quickly has 
become known as an efficient baby 
pacifier. Demand for import copies 
of the disc has grown so quickly in 
this country that Capitol is rush- 
releasing it. 



stranger and leaving the bathroom 
with a new-found friend, or 
meeting someone in a class who 
also lives in the dorm. A picnic is 
being planned by the residents to 
increase interaction, and intramural 
teams are being formed. All the 
rooms are singles, allowing both for 
privacy and no roommate dif- 
ficulties. 

An optional food plan is offered 
in Franklin Dining Commons for 
those who live in the dorm. The 
dining commons is open weekdays; 
the basic meal plan is either two or 
three meals a day. Strips of tickets 
can be purchased weekly for either 
five breakfasts, lunches or dinners. 
Meals are also available for anyone 
who wants to eat in the dining 
commons. 





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12 



THF MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



NESDAY, JULY 9, 1975 



wu cnNESPAY, JULY 9, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



13 



Stephen Gaskin 
and the Farm Band 



is not just another 
rock'n roll group 



By Dan LaBonte 

Stephen Gaskin and the Farm 
Band is a very out-of-the-ordinary 
group. First of all, they play every 
concert for free — yep, for free. 
Secondly, their program 
traditionally consists of a com- 
bination of Macon, Georgia down 
home jug band boogie music and a 
semi-lecture question and answer 
period where Stephen fields 
questions from the audience on 
topics which range from mid- 
wivery to the amount of proteins in 
vegetables. Back in the sixties, their 
performances would probably have 
been labeled talk'n .dance-ins, but 
make no mistake, Stephen 'and the 
Band's concert on Sunday more 
than pleased the 500-odd '"long- 
hairs" (vs. "Square-hairs") who 
congregated on Metawampee 
Lawn. 

After recently finishing a per- 
formance in Turners Falls, and 
staging an impromptu concert at 
their campgrounds just the night 
before, the six-piece band opened 
their concert here with a set that 
rang of Southern rock'n roll. Their 
music is difficult to pin down, but 
the foot-stompin' sounds are like a 
combination of Marshall Tucker, 
the Allman Bros., Grinder Switch, 
Charlie Daniels, early Beatles, B.B. 
King, and someone else you just 
can't put your finger on with a 
melody you know you've heard 
before but just can't place. 



Notices 



Enjoy the outdoors: Day trips will 
be leaving the Student Union every 
Tuesday and Thursday to go 
canoeing, caving, and rock climbing. 
Information is on the outing club 
bulletin board. Everyone welcome. 

Notice submitted by Larry Bur 
croff, Outing Club, office 428B SU. 
545 3131. 
LOST 

White dog, collie-huskie shephard, 
rather large, lost Friday near Union. 
Call 586-0935 evenings for Steve. 
GAY WOMEN'S CAUCUS 

Meets every Monday Evening at 
7:30 p.m. Check Campus Center list 
for room number. Come and join in! 



With Gaskin behind one set of 
drums, the band finished their first 
set beneath a sun that someone 
must have set for bake. But as he 
took the microphone and came off 
stage and ' into the audience to 
"begin his dissertation, someone 
else must have placed a divine 
order for relief, and scattered 
clouds floated across the sun's 
oath. 

Before taking questions from the 
audience, Gaskin began by an- 
swering questions most-likely-to- 
be-asked, like "how in the world 
can the band afford to travel cross- 
country putting on free concerts?" 
The answer to this is simple, "we're 
a non-profit organization" ex- 
plained Gaskin. 

Actually the answer to that 
question isn't all that simple, and an 
explanation of sorts can be found in 
any of Gaskin's three books, either 
Caravan, Hey Beatnik, or The 
Monday Night Class. But for those 
who haven't read the books, Gaskin 
explained that all 800 individuals 
who live on the 1200 acre Tenn. 
farm begin their residence by taking 
a vow of poverty. Everyone who 
belongs to one of the 16 or 17 
smaller farms within the commune 
learns a practical skill; some belong 
to the wrecking crew that does 
demolition work in neighboring 
communities, some learn carpentry 
and construction, "we could build 
an entire village right to your 
specifications." 




Stephen Gaskins (on drums) 
audience into a footstomping 
Sunday afternoon. 

Others learn various other 
marketable trades and, naturally, 
there's farming. The work load is 
divided as evenly as possible, and 
when there's more work to be done 
in one area, say at harvest time, 
everyone pitches in and "works 
until the job is done." All the money 



Caustic Comments 



By Mike "two-tone" Kostek 

Captain Fantastic & 

The Brown Dirt Cowboy 

ELTON JOHN 

(MCA 2142) 46 30 
Here we enter the 'famous 
celebrity' syndrome, with an album 
of Eltie and Bernie's early struggles. 
So what?, you may ask. Good 
question, as outside of his ar- 
tificailly-induced circle of admirers, 
this record has nothing to do with 
Art. Not much fun, either. C. 



New Teeth 
ROBERT KLEIN 
(Epic PE 33536) 

time 52:53 

The disturbing things about this, 
Klein's third album, is that he 
continues to become more en- 
tertaining and less the funny critic 
of the stupid things we do and are 
done to us. We need more than a 
hip Jack Benny, which is what this 
genuinely funny man is sliding 
towards. C \ . 



and his band stirred a captivated 
frenzy on the Metawampe lawn 

the community makes from its 
various sources, including the three 
books and the album the band has 
produced, goes toward the 
commune. Personal decisions 
involving individual profit is 
secondary to the benefit of the 
community. The commune is 

FLASH FEARLESS VERSUS 
THE ZORG WOMEN. 

PARTS 5 & 6 

(Chrysalis CHR 1072) 

time 38:00 

These 'collection of musicians' 

albums usually stiff out, as they're 

not used to playing together, and 

the fokes writing the tunes are 

people you'd probably never hear 

of were it not for their mysterious 

ability to gather the starry ones. C. 




GLOBE THEATRE 

Northampton 586-0935 

Peter Bogdanovich's 

Targets 

with Borris Karloff 

Wed. Tues. at 7:00 & 10:00 

PLUS 

Harrold & Maud 

Wed. -Tues. 8:40 
Sat. -Tues. 11:30 
Monday and Tuesday Dollar 
Nights 

other nights SI. 75 



-Cbu\\j£dA 



virtually self sufficient. 

But money isn't what makes the 
commune work. "Love keeps us 
together," Gaskin said, "and 
spiritually keeps us going." 

Being a non-profit organization, 
in case the farm ever folds, all 
residual capital outlay would go to 
another non-profit organization in 
California. Presumably, the 
community Gaskin was speaking of 
is "Tassajara", Shunyru Suzuki 
Rochi's Zen community in the 
mountains north of San Francisco. 
Gaskin was very close to Suzuki 
prior to his death and Suzuki's 
monestary, a soto sect of Zen 
Bhuddism in Japan, would be 
Gaskin's probable heir. 

The band's tour takes them to 
colleges all over the country, 
ironically however, Gaskin, to say 
the least, has a low opinion of a 
college education. 

"College is like an artificial 
adolescence. It puts you in cold 
storage for a while." Gaskin was 
speaking, of how many students, 
"especially English, History, and 
Social Science majors", tend to kill 
time in college without ever ac- 
complishing anything constructive. 
He favored an education which 
would benefit society as a whole, 
say a doctor or lawyer who gets his 
degree and donates his services, 
without demanding outrageous 
fees, to those who need it. 

Gaskin drew a round of hearty 
applause when he said, "Colleges 
are convenient for the ad- 
ministration, it gets you off the 
labor market so statistics don't look 
so bad." 

For individuals who feel they're 
wasting time or have found no 
particular direction, Gaskin 
recommended that they visit the 
commune. Accommodations are 
available, but Gaskin said there's 
kind of a running joke at the 
commune that actually is pretty 
much a truism, and that is "You 
can stay for two days or the rest of 
your life." 



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M0N I TUES ALL SEATS \\ 00 




I 



In Concert: 

John Lincoln Wright and the Sourdough 

Boys 

Tracy Nelson and Mother Earth 

Emmylou Harris and the Hot Band 

Doc and Merle Watson and the Frosty 

Morning Boys 

Music Inn 

July 4 

By Tyla Michelove 

The Music Inn opened for its fifth season 
of summer concerts on the Fourth, and 
appropriately enough it was hot, sunny, 
picnic weather, complete with ants and flies. 
It was a day just ripe for the romantic 
American Adventure. It must have started 
differently for others, but for me it started at 
11 o'clock. My knapsack carefully packed 
with a peanut butter sandwich, two apples 
and a notebook, my thumb out on route 91 
and absolutely no notion of where Lenox 
was other than a stop on the Mass. Pike and 



He was replaced by John Lincoln Wright and 
the Sourdough Boys. I've heard that they are 
pretty good at what they do, which is 
Country swing. It seemed that they never 
once strayed outside the already restrictive 
limitations of Country and Western stan- 
dards. The lead singer had a narrow vocal 
range and tried to push it too hard. Their 
originals were not too bad, as everyone was 
comfortable and sure of their capabilities. 
They are a mighty tight band and hold much 
promise for the future, but for now nothing 
unique, nothing outstanding. 

Tracy Nelson and Mother Earth were next 
with some of the heavy Country blues. 
Again, lead vocals could have been a lot 
better. The range was there, but dynamics 
were mellowed into nothingness. In general, 
the piano was almost impossible to hear, as it 
was drowned out by a very tight rhythm 
section (would that all bands had a drummer 
and bassist that worked together so well). 




Ken Shapiro 



Emmylou Harris 



no idea how to get to the Music Inn once I 
got that far. (Hint for those who follow: Take 
the Pike to Lee and get onto route 102 and 
follow the signs to the Inn.) 

The Inn itself is a field with a stage and 
sound system, a bar complete with refresh- 
ments, and a movie house. It is not much to 
look at and not that exciting acoustically. 
Beware, also, of the field that is used as a 
parking lot. The grass is high and the ditches 
many. More than one car got stuck or 
damaged getting in and out. Traffic control is 
a problem, too. As the summer progresses 
things might get better, but for now the 
advice is to get there early, leave late and 
take somebody else's car. 

Now for the concert itself: one, two, three 
Country! Phil Ochs got trapped someplace in 
New York tourist traffic and couldn't show. 



Their stage presence was very affected, 
more like a local high school band than 
recording artists. There were high points, 
however, that made this set very enjoyable. 
"(There's nothing cold as ashes) After the 
fire is gone" had some excellent vocal 
harmonies and a high level of energy. 
"Mother Earth" had a great guitar break, sort 
of Hendrix derivative, but very effective. The 
vocals were nice as well, calling for "Can't 
buy a thrill" as an encore. If the whole set 
had as much quality as these three songs, 
Tracy Nelson would have much more 
satisfying show. 

It was Emmylou Harris' last stop on her 
tour and the audience was filled with curious 
people, just waiting to see who this lady was. 
Before winter she was mostly just a 
background voice on Country records, then 



Concerts 



she came out with an album of her own 
called Pieces of the Sky and everybody was 
dropping her name. It's sort of Country's 
equivelant to the Minnie Riperton story. The 
album cover reflects a sophisticated, but blue 
woman; to us, however, she appeared as a 
young adolescent in a short country print 
dress and white shoes, guitar just as big as 
she. It was almost shocking to^ee her raise a 
full bottle of whiskey to her lips - the 
images simply didn't fit together. 

At first her voice was high, weak and 
fluttery compared to Tracy Nelson, but into 
"Coat of many colors" she proved its 
superiority. Her range and variety refreshed 
the day, making sunburns and thirst 
disappear as all attention shifted to the stage. 
She danced around like a child and smiled. 
She was having a good time up there and 
giving us some good music as well. The band 
seemed to be more in control than Emmylou, 
deciding what was played, who was too fast 
and working around Emmylou instead of 
with her. It didn't seem to matter that much, 
because everything coming out of the 
speaker was good and of a high quality 
energy. "Shop around" got a standing £ 
ovation from at least half the field and she 2 
was brought back for two encores, one of o 
which was "Queen of the Silver Dollar". This 
is by far her best song and can be found on 
Pieces of the Sky. Live, it carries even more 
depth and more dramatic pain. It was hard 
for the roadies to get her off the stage as 
everyone was still calling for more. 

Doc Watson with his son Merle was kind 
of a let-down from the Harris energy. 
Everything they played could have been 
heard on any album almost the same way. It 
was good pickin', not great. Same old songs, 
same old sounds; "Corina, Corina", "Doc's 
Talkin'", "Walbash Cannonball", "Ten- 
nessee Stud", "Treat me like a fool" and 
"Blue Suede Shoes". 

Some of the best parts involved Merle's 
band, the Frosy Mornin' Bogs. It was in- 
teresting to see Doc play with some of his 
son's friends. They did some four part 
harmonies that were really good. Doc's bass 
vocals on "Southbound Passenger Train" 
were great! "Mama Don't Allow No Music ' 
Round Here" was the all-around best song. 
Joe Smothers plays some mean washboard 
and Michael Caldwin played an excellent 
bass sole. The blues break, with everyone 
playing, was the most exciting moment in 
the set, fast, smooth and beautifully 
arranged. 

The sun started to set and without being 
reminded, people started cleaning the 
garbage off the field as they left. As they filed 
out, one could see that although the crowd 
was mostly college-age, there were a large 
number of whole families, grandparents 
carrying sleeping infants. In keeping with the 
spirit of the day, cars stopped to help other 
cars get put of muddy ruts in the road to 102, 
and no hitch-hiker waited more than a 
minute to get a ride. No one left disappointed 
and most said they'd be back to the Music 
Inn before the summer's end. 

P.S. Whoever picked the tapes for the 
breaks and set changes, you get an A. It was 
good Country all day. 




In Concert 
Gordon Lightfoot 
Tanglewood July 1 



and 



By Susan Genser 
Lisa Sam met 




Gordon Lightfoot 



Canadian folksinger Gordon Lightfoot flew 
into Tanglewood Tuesday, July 1, to delight 
a crowd estimated at 8,000. 

Starting off promptly with "High and 
Dry," Lightfoot then moved into some of his 
more popular pieces, such as "Carefree 
Highway", "Sundown", and "Rainy Day 
People". 

"Don Quixote", "Sundown", and "If you 
could read my mind" were real crowd- 
pleasers. On the latter, Lightfoot was moved 
by the crowd's cheers to sing part of the 
song over. His singing throughout the 
concert was strong and millifluous, the 
sound was heard as if it were a recording. 

The youthful audience was described by 
Tanglewood attendants as "mellow", and 
indeed the only disturbance noted was a cop 
chasing a young male across the grass. It 
was a rare night, cloudless and starry, and 
most people were stretched out on the lawn. 
Wrapped in blankets, contentedly sipping 
beer or wine, they listed to the music, singing 
or clapping along if they felt like it. At the end 
of each piece they showed their pleasure 
with thunderous bursts of applause. 

This was Lightfoot's first engagement at 
Tanglewood, and production manager 
Richard Harison, acting as spokesman for 
the artist, told our reporters. Lightfoot en- 
joyed being there, and "everything was all 
chuckles." 

Lightfoot's style is the soft, but not mushy, 
fofk-bailad, and he stuck to this throughout 



the first hald of the performance. During the 
second half, he played up to the enthusiastic 
crowd. Wearing a "Save the Whale" button 
presented to him by a fan, Lightfoot seemed 
more relaxed, and talked to the audience 
more. Playing a spoof of a 1940's Bogart- 
style song, he laughingly fell off the piano 
bench. 

But the real mood of the second half was 
evident in two songs, "Big Blue" and "Too 
Late For Praying", both' of which show 
Lightfoot's opinion of the world and human 
nature. "Big Blue" depicts the destruction of 
whales by mankind, and "Too Late for 
Praying" asks whether man has anything left 
to pray for. 

The only real flaw of the performance was 
the stage lighting. As a song writer, he is 
unpretentious, as a singer his style is simple, 
and it seemed hypocritical and more than a 
tirfle sad to see him bathed in purple or green 
lights. Not only that, it also looked terrible. 
He appeared best in pure white light; it was 
more in character. 

After three encores, and the crowd still 
calling for "More!", "More!", Lightfoot 
ended the performance with "In the Early 
Morning Rain." The crowd then returned 
from whence they came, the groupies, older 
and more well-behaved than most, gathered 
at the backstage door, and the entertainer 
packed up to fly back to Canada, his beloved 
homeland. 



The second day of festivities at the 
Music Inn included Tom Rush (shown 
above). Orphan, Mimi Farina, Leon 
Redbone, Wendy Waldman, and Orleans. 



CAUSTIC 
COMMENTS 

By Mike Kostek 

Days of Wine and Neuroses 
MARTIN MULL 
(Capricorn CP 0155) 
time 29:49 

After three luminescent records 
that stand solid for hours, Mssr. 
Mull has come up dry. D.O.W.A. 
New Roses is under a half- hour 
long, and contains only three tunes 
up to past Standards {Norma/ness): 
"My Own Review", fine swinging 
tribal schumpfeldt, and two beauts 
that hit the delicate underedge of 
the wispier aspects of our day-to- 
day romantic aqtics, "Just 
Tonight" and "Just A Dream". The 
man loves life, and hates the one 
we're led into living. 

A bad year C-. 

Spirit of 76 
SPIRIT 

(Mercury SRM 2 804) 
time 82:14 
So loudly a turkey is this Randy 
California two-disc enema that it is 
amazing that any record company 
would afford such a vinyl 
throwaway. The word "Spirit" here 
is a misnomer, as this is only 
California and stepfather Ed "Cass" 
Cassidy; Cassidy plays drums while 
Randy does just about everything 
else (including writing liner notes 
that spell society with an 'a'). D. 

ROGER MCGUINN Er BAND 

(Columbia PC 33541) 

time 29:13 

If this album isn't the result of 
some evil outside force as contract 
deadline chopchop, then Roger 
McGuinn's musical direction is 
confuf ad, dilapidated and sorry. C-. 

Venus & Mars 
WINGS 

(Capitol SMAS 11419) 
time 45:26 
Well okay, here, a bit less than 
Band On The Hun, but the forty- 
five minutes of musical ointment 
here will please Wings fans just 
about as much as they'd like to be. 
B. 

Alive In New York — 
Chapter Four 
GATOBARBIERI 
(Impulse! ASD 9303) 
41:05 
A desultory up-tempo album, if 
you can grok such a thang. Gato's 
said all this before better. All before 
better? C. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 




WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1975 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1975 _ 



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By Jaibee 

This series is about Sunsigns. 
This month we are in the sign of 
Cancer the Crab, June 22-July 23. 

Those born under the sign of 
Cancer the Crab have been given a 
more descriptive name — 
Moonchildren. Moon — lunar — 
looney. Remember the person who 
tcld those silly jokes and then 
laughed at them with the craziest 
laugh, whose deep moods swung 
from high to low at the drop of a 
hat, and who was in general pretty 
unpredictable? — Probably a 
Cancerian. 

Moreso than any other sign, 
Moonchildren are ruled by the 
changing phases of the Moon. 

Under the light of a silvery full 
moon, the full scale of a July child's 
imagination and emotions is played. 
A Cancerian reaches his full 
potential at this part of the month. 
A knowledgeable Moonchild takes 
advantage of these changing lunar 
cycles to promote his natural 
talents. 

Cancerians love the sea. They try 
to be near it, even if its only to take 
a yearly vacation at the shore. 

"Home" and "security" are two 
key words in the Cancerian 
vocabulary. No matter how much 
wanderlust a Cancerian possesses, 
and after all those trips to far off 
places, a child of Cancer breathes a 
sigh of relief upon reaching home. 

It is essential for a Cancerian to 
feel secure. A home, food, and 
money are important to his security 
and if he feels these are lacking, his 
life is dedicated to getting them. 

Since food is important to a July 
child, its only natural that Can- 
cerians are often excellent cooks. 
And if they don't cook, they cer- 
tainly enjoy a good meal. There is 
also a propensity toward a sweet 
tooth, so a July child should be ever 
watchful of his weight. 

Thoughts of family and 
reminiscences of the past are often 
in a Cancerian's thoughts. "Home 
is where the Heart is" was probably 
coined by a Cancerian. 

Unless afflicted by other 
planetary influences, a July child 
has an excellent memory. Added to 
an interest in history than many 
have, he can reel off historical 
information and other trivia. 

It would only make sense then 
that since the United States is a 
Cancerian (July 4, 1776) and the 
Bicentennial is almost here, the 
men running the country are 
Moonchildren. Both Gerald Ford 
and Nelson Rockefeller were born 
in July. 

A contradiction to others as well 
as to himself, a Cancerian 
possesses immense insight, in- 
tuitive powers, and the ability to 
strip others to the bone, while 
looking at his own life through rose- 
colored glasses. Some Cancerians 
are quite psychic, depending on 
their entire natal chart. 

Cancerians have an enormous 
control of imagery with moods so 
deep that they can make others feel 
them too. Not only can they absorb 
life, its joys and sorrows, but also 
can reflect them. Who can forget 
the imagery in the writings of 
Cancerian Ernest Hemingway or 



the films of Ingmar Bergman? 

As a crab retreats to its shell in 
times of danger, so does the 
Cancerian Crab when depressed or 
insulted. Gentle prodding and 
praise help in bringing the Cancer 
Crab back out. 

Since Cancer is a "Cardinal" 
sign, a person born under this sign 
feels that what he is doing is of vast 
importance and he works con- 
tinuously to reach the goal he has 
set for himself. But like the crab, he 
moves sideways, forwards, and 
backwards toward his goal instead 
of moving directly toward it like 
those of some other signs would. 
But he is relentless and if he sees 
the goal, usually what he considers 
optimum security, slipping away, 
he'll grab onto it tenaciously and 
won't let go. 

If handled right, this dedication 
to his goal can gain the Cancerian 
leadership and prominence. 

Not letting go also results in a 
Cancerian being a "collector", of 
people and things. After all, you 
never know when that doll's arm or 
Boy Scout manual might come in 
handy! 

I know a Cancerian who is always 
looking for scraps fo string and 
twine to add to her huge string ball. 
It makes sense then, that a 
Cancerian is notorious for hiding 
small bills in obscure hiding places, 
in drawers, record albums, etc. 
Months later he will find the 
forgotten money by accident. 

Newspapers and superficial 
astrological sources tend to em- 
phasize a Cancerians domesticity; 
that their heart's desire is to have a 
home and raise children. This is not 
always true. Many are totally 
undome-tic and prefer a career. As 
mentioned earlier, a home and 
family are important, but Can- 
cerians are searchers and they like 
change. 

Although basically shy, they like 
being in the limelight. Moon- 
children often are found on stage, 
in films, television, or writing. As 
they like making people laugh, 
Cancerians become professional 
comedians. 

If not promoting themselves, 
they are often found in advertising 
or public relations promoting other 
people or products. 

Other professions Cancerians are 
in counseling and social work. They 
work well with people, are warm 
and generous, and their natural 
insight helps them. 

Another choice profession for 
Cancerians is business. They are 
aware of trends, the value of 
money, and know how to build 
empires, whether its in land or 
some other commodity. As one 
astrological book puts it, Can- 
cerians are "in the thick of the 
future." 

Anyone involved with a Can- 
cerian should remember he hates 
critisizm, needs to feel secure, and 
requires praise to help dispel daily 
self-doubts and fears. Self-doubts 
can always be dispelled during a 
delicious moonlight dinner by the 
sea! 

Next month — Leo the Lion. 





Blue Wall gets a face lift 



Photos by Ed McCarthy and Debbie Schafer 



By Ed McCarthy and 
Bonnie Allen 

The business manager of the 
Campus Center says work in the 
Bluewall is proceeding on schedule 
and should be completed by Sept. 
1. 

John Corker called the Bluewall 
renovations a "face lift" that will 
make the bar more comfortable, 
cleaner and safer. 




Changes and additions include: 

— a lighted, carpeted tunnel into 
the Bluewall to provide better 
crowd control 

— benches, tables and chairs on 
a raised platform to the left of the 
entrance to provide an intimate 
atmosphere 

— an enclosed pinball unit to the 
right of the entrance containing 12 
games under a controlled lighting 
system 

— a dance floor increased by 
four feet 

— low hanging lamps over the 
bar for a better lighting tone 



* UMass Budget cuts 



continued from pg. 3 
and how those representatives 
finally vote" on the issue, said Hite. 
At this time the University is 
limping along on a temporary 
budget passed the same day that 
Hite and others met in Boston with 
people from Wood's office. This 
temporary budget is set at one sixth 
of last year's appropriation minus 
10 per cent except for permanent 
staff of the University. Rough 
estimates by the Collegian would 
indicate about a net reduction of 
five per cent in the total monies 



allocated for the two month period 
of July and August. 

If the cuts are realized this Fall 
Hite predicts that a minimum of 
1 ,200 fewer students will be able to 
find employment through the 
University. "There is no maybe 
about it, that will be the number 
lost," said Hite. 

Other things sure to go would be 
any new purchases by the library, 
and the closing of unique and 
alternative programs that have 
made the University innovative in 



its approach to higher education 
said Hite. 

"The quality of education will 
slip, it will have to", said Hite. 

But a loss of quality education at 
UMass will not be due to the lack of 
effort by students of the University 
who maintain a constant vigile 
throughout the summer in an at- 
tempt to preserve programs the 
students want. 

"We're going to fight it — we're 
going to spend as much time, as 
much money as we have to", said 
Hite. 



* ORL director chosen 



continued from pg. 3 

In light of the June 4th ruling on 
mandatory dorm requirements, 
Rudy said that he does not like 
"anything mandatory" unless it can 
be justified — something that 
should be explored. He has "no 
qualms on making feasible 
changes." 

In the meantime, acting director 
Kenneth Dean has been asked by 
Chancellor Bromery to take on a full 
time assignment directing the 
management audit of the Campus 
Center-Student Union complex. 

"The void in leadership of the 
Office of Residential Life comes at 
an unfortunate time, just as plans 
are crystallizing for resource 
allocation and program develop- 
ment," Vice-Chancellor Gage said 
in a memorandum. "Fortunately, 
W. Daniel Fitzpatrick has agreed to 
assume this added responsibility on 



short notice on an interm basis until 
the new director has been ap- 
pointed and begun work. Mr. Dean 
and Mr. Fitzpatrick have been 
working closely together - and will 
continue to do so — in order to 
minimize the loss of momentum in 
planning and preparing for next 
year," Gage added. 

Mr. Fitzpatrick said that it is 
difficult for him to make any long 
range plans and he sees no major 
policy changes in ORL. 

According to Fitzpatrick, the 
mandatory dorm requirements 
legally couldn't remain at 18. "I am 
told that there will be crowded 
conditions in September with an 
older population," he said. 

"Butterfield dorm will most likely 
begin renovations in January and 
new plumbing will be installed in 
Crabtree over the summer due to 



In addition, said Corker, some 
new tables and chairs will be in- 
stalled while the ceiling is being 
repainted, the walls sandblasted, 
and the floor tiled in certain areas. 

A bid of $65,000 was accepted 
about a year ago by the Campus 
Center Board of Governors from 
the engineering firm of Ferguson 

and Sorrentino. According to the 
contract, all costs over the ac- 
cepted bid must be absorbed by the 
":m. They say costs are running 
above that amount already. 

What about the cost of beer in 
Sept.? The price, according to 
Corker, is not expected to increase. 



axWSlls 



j. di$cd(<jfieque & restaurant 

J BARBEQUE CHICKEN and SPARERIBS | 

I $2.95 n 'g ht 'y 5:00-11:00 | 



At The Elmwood Rte. 9 Hadley 




the emergency situation that exists 
there." Fitzpatrick continues, "It 
worries me to see dorm work 
sacrificed because of money. We 
should have a 10-15 year renovation 
cycle." At present the university 
does one dorm every eighteen 
months which means a 75 year 
cycle. 

In order to balance their budget, 
the office of residential life is not 
going to fill vacant posts with new 
people and many people are 
concerned about their jobs, ac- 
cording to Fitzpatrick. When asked 
about his future, he said he would 
still be around after August 15, but 
not with the added responsibilities 
of being Director of Residential 
Life. "On the 16th, I turn into a 
pumpkin," he chuckled. 



LANDRY' S MARKE T 

The Oldest Grocery in Amherst 



Michelobe — 12oi. Nr— 6.50 case 

Munich — 12 oi. NR — 4.25 case 

Balentine Ale — 12 oz. NR — 5.55 case 

Heineken — 12 oz. Nr — 14.95 case 

Schaef er — 12 oz. cans — 5.50 case 

Ice 

Pure Hardwood Charcole — 1.29 

Fresh ground beef 

Tenderloin Steak 

(Fillet Mignion) 

First Prize Franks 



1.69 six pack 

1.09 six pack 

1.39 six pack 

3.75 six pack 

1.39 six pack 

50c for eleven pound bag 

18 lb. bag 

79c lb. 

2.591b. 

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3 1b. family pack 3.99 



Check our other low steak & meat prices 



Balogna 
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Idelnot farm fresh milk 
Cabots triple score butter 
Vermont chedder cheese 
California Carrots 
Sweet Santa Rosa Plums 
Bananas 



all only SI .09 lb. 



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On the Belchertown Bus Route 



16 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1975, 



Comments 



$$$$$$ makes the world go 



Well, not in this case. It is 
amazing to find that while UMass 
students pay for everything, except 
salaries, they control nothing. Why 
is it that after we pay for the 
building and maintenance of 
dorms, class buildings, the Campus 
Center, Dining Commons, and who 
knows what else, these facilities all 
become state owned. It is a fact 
that Massachusetts — ranked the 
fifth best sti.te to live in — is ranked 
forty-ninth in its aid to state higher 
education. Now, state higher 
education does not only include 
UMass Amherst and its 25,000 
students; it also includes UMass 
Boston, the medical school in 
Worcester, and all of the dozens of 
state colleges. 

Thus, with a state government 
paying so little of its annual budget 



round 



Robert Golner 



for higher education, the burden is 
put on the students. Yet who reaps 
the rewards of these private funds 
— money in the form of fees 
students are forced to pay to attend 

UMass — and thus gains control of 
this worthy real estate? Well, who 
else but that same institution that 
refuses to pay for it — the state! 
Can this be fair? Is this the 




AMERICAN WAY? Surely not! 
These dorms, Dining Commons, 
and buildings belong to the 
students and not to the state. If the 
state wants them — let it pay for 
them. Let it pay these fees and 
discontinue student payment on 
University real estate. 
Obviously, this will be of last rate 
consideration in today's recession- 
ridden economy, and in a state 
which can't balance its own 
budget, in a state that has an 
almost insurmountable deficit, and 
with a governor who is so one issue 
oriented and steadfast on that issue 
that he will do anything in his 
power, no matter how illogical ir 
disasterous, to balance the budget. 
The only compromising solution 
is to have these buildings turned 
over to a board of students and 
administrations. With equal say, the 
students can protect their fellow 
classmates from an expansion 
hungry administration that can 
build and build because eventually 
this building will be paid for by the 
students. This board with the 
students can also insure the OUR 
real estate is getting what we pay 
for it in the form of maintenance 
and renovation as well as giving the 
students a greater say as to how 
they should be run, how they can 
be run more efficiently and with 
less cost to the students, and to 
supervise to insure against "shady" 
and harmful dealings and to plan 
for lowering fees on the real estate. 
Remember, this campus prac- 
tically belongs to everyone of us. 
We must plan for the future unless 
we want monstrocities like South- 
west, the Fine Arts Center, or the 
Campus Center on the hands and 
out of the pockets of our brothers 
and sisters or our children! 



Many students find it humiliating to request 
financial aid. 

Gas pains erupt again 



Rob Melacasa 



Does anyone out there remember the "gas crisis"? 
For those of you who do remember, qet readv for 
another one. It seems, however, that there aren't very 
many who believe the warnings of the oil companies, 
the government, the Petroleum institute, and even 
Harry at the corner Mobil (who probably knows more 
than the rest). These are the same happy motorists 
who didn't believe President Nixon (so who believed 
anything he said?) when he made one of his frequent 
television spiels telling us how poor we were going to 
be, from his million dollar blue room (the white house 
in your living room, remember friends?). The same 
people who weren't convinced even when the 
national speed limit was lowered, or the price began 
to rise - in fact, the same people who instigated the 
fist fights in the two hour gas lines. They weren't 
really convinced until the red and green flag, license 
plate number system was established. 

Not only did these people not believe, but they have 
forgotten all about it. You can see them every day, 
they're easily identifiable. Just look for the cars doing 
seventy on the Mass. Pike. Thanks to them, the rest of 
us, the ones who only drive our small economy cars to 
and from work, and do our vacationing on bicycles, 
are faced with pulling out the brass knuckles for 
another long, dry winter. 

Are they really to blame? Maybe not, but somebody 
is. According to a recent New York Times article, the 
demand for gasoline has been growing steadily, and 
the present level of gasoline stocks is the lowest since 



the summer of '73. In fact, industry statistics indicate 
that we may be facing the tightest gas supplies since 
the Arab embargo. And it's not because we don't 
have enough oil. The oil is here, even though we are 
still importing more than we mine nationally, despite 
President Ford's attempts to change that (in fact we 
imported more this year than last year). But the 
amount of crude oil processed by refineries is down to 
83.2 per cent of capacity, as compared with an 
average of 90.3 per cent last year. Our gasoline stocks 
fell to 199.8 million barrels last week, from 201.8 
million in the preceeding week, and 224 million barrels 
is a comparable week a year ago. On March 1, 1974 
when we were feeling the "crunch" the worst, our 
gasoline stocks stood at 226.5 million barrels. 

Last year was an easy year for motorists, but watch 
out. Not only is gas going to be harder to find, 
especially in this state (nobody likes us since we voted 
for McGovern), but it's going to cost more. 

The 1 dollar a barrel import tax will cost us 3 cents a 
gallon. Gov. Dukakis' new tax will cost us another 3 
cents. If things get short, the price will go up ac- 
cordingly as the oil companies attempt to offset their 
higher cost by passing the expense on to guess who. 
This in turn will raise the cost of other petroleum 
products, which encompasses almost everything we 
buy, but especially in the area of home heating fuel, 
which is already high and short. 

And who is to blame? The public will blame the 
industry and government; the industry will blame the 
administration and Congress; the administration will 
blame the industry and Congress; congress will blame 
the industry and the administration. So maybe the 
seventy mile an hour Cadillacs pulling the Air stream 
trailers from Hartford to Catskill for the weekend 
aren't to blame. But I'm not convinced. 



(The Massachusetts Summer Collegian welcomes all letters to the editor. They must be signed and 
include the author's address and phone number. Also, all letters must be typed, double-spaced, at sixty 
spaces per line, and no more than two pages. 
Organizations may submit letters, but they must include a name and phone number for reference 
purposes. 



Letters- 

The AIB fires back 



I gave the Assassination Information Bureau's audio-visual presentation 
"Who Killed J. F.K. " on July 1 at UMass. It has been my experience, having 
lectured on the subject throughout the country, that most people do not 
believe the conclusions drawn by the Warren Commission concerning the 
assassination of John Kennedy. However, the question that is inevitably 
raised is how did the American media cover-up the enormous realities of 
Dallas? 

Well, residents of Amherst, we are fortunate to have a superb example 
of the journalistic irresponsibility and incompetence necessary to ignore or 
obscure any issue short of the Martians landing in New Jersey. 

I am referring to an article written by E. Patrick McQuaid that was 
published in July 2 issue of the Massachusetts Summer Collegian. It is 
entitled "Who Killed J. F.K." 

Our intellects and moral sensibilities are abused by a biased, poorly 
written, factually incorrect story that is devoid of any coherent or 
meaningful statement. The article casts serious doubts on the honesty, 
ethics and politics of its author, E. Patrick McQuaid. 

Mr. McQuaid ooenlv soeculated whether the Assassination Information 
Bureau is a C.I. A. derivative of one sort or another. This is a serious charge 

that would warrant, so it would seem, significant reason for raising it. What 
are his grounds? 

He toys with the idea of the AIB working for the "government" because 
a member of my audience had raised this point the night before at the 
lecture. Mr. McQuaid follows up such devastating evidence of our CI. A. 
relations by some powerful logic. To support his speculations, he states the 
fact that the AIB would be cut out of a job if justice were to be ever dealt in 
the Kennedy murder. Sweet Jesus, McQuaid, that is akin to accusing 
Ralph Nader of being on the General Motors payroll because he helped kill 
the Corvair. 

What are your politics, E. Patrick McQuaid? Why didn't you tell your 
readers, if you are at all moved by truthful and ethical journalistic practices, 
that YOU were the "someone" who asked me if I was C.I. A. at the lecture? 
Where do you find the audacity to impugn my integrity on such false and 
twisted reasoning? 

On the aforementioned bedrock of evidence, you carry your distorted 
train of thought further by introducing more arguments. You wonder 
whether the AIB is something other than what it appears to be because 
"It's interesting to note that the Information's Bureau's initials are identical 
to the American Institute of Banking...." 

Holy Investigative Reporting!! If you really believe that is interesting and 
significant, you must be the most boring and unimaginative person north 
of Springfield. Are you dealing with realities as they exist, or are you just 
conjuring up insidious impressions in your reader's minds based on not-so- 
subtle innuendo, your own groundless rumors, and less than sophmoric 
logic? 

Never mind that you are factually incorrect on several occasions {For 
example, you introduce the article by noting a slide I simply didn 't show. 
Either you were at the wrong lecture, or the seven font images on the 
screen behind me were not enough for the keen eyes of E. Patrick 
McQuaid \. 

So what if you have the political sophistication of a lamb chop [you talk 
about those bogeymen, the C.I. A. and how you find them so "Believable". 
An astute student would realize that there are nineteen Federal intelligence 
agencies, of which the C.I. A. is just one, not to mention the scores of 
private and state intelligence groups. I just made mention of a "domestic 
intelligence conspiracy" being responsible for the Kennedy shooting]. It 
appears that your sole political science education consists of daily viewings 
of the CBS News]. 

I'm even willing to forget your tortured syntax ] You had one sentence 
with 61 words!!] and your complete inability to coherently develop and 
articulate a smooth flow of ideas and information. 

These just tell me you are a lousy reporter who should pawn his 
typewriter at the first convenient moment. 

What disturbs me is the simple fact that you've ignored the issues and 
politics I raised. You created false controversies out of straw and your own 
wind. You have obfuscated and betrayed a powerful need for the Truth, a 
need for honesty and integrity in this country even you would be hard 
pressed to deny. 

Where are you at, E. Patrick McQuaid? I think we deserve better than 
that shoddy and irresponsible collection of words you would call jour- 
nalistic writing. This issue is far too important and grim for all of us to be 
bantered about as you deem fit. 

Harvey Yazijian 

Keep off the crass 

I read with some dismay the unanimous opinion of the Summer Board of 
Editors that I am a "known incompetent. " I realize that news is a little 
scarce during the summer, but to resort to crass sensationalism is, I feel, 
entirely unnecessary. 

It is once amusing and saddening to see how quickly an anonymous 
group of campus "leaders" decide that the very same document which 
provides for the existence of their medium is hopelessly obscure in its 
dealings with another. 

When WMUA accepted its S AT F budget for fiscal '76, it was well aware 
that only SATF monies from the Senate could be used to pay salaries of 
people working over the summer. There was a very clear binding clause to 
that effect. It now comes to pass that WMUA feels that it needs more 
money to pay people. I agree. But because this was not determined until 
fairly late in the game, the Senate couldn't make the adjustment. Binding 
clauses are not just busy-work for the Senate; they are put there for a 
reason, and this particular clause was not disputed by WMUA when they 
accepted their budget. 

Finally, I would like to make some observations concerning the editorial 
published by the Collegian: 

71 In the editorial, it was stated "it seems probably that we will lose the 
Campus radio station. " This is so far-fetched I am surprised anyone had 
the gall to print it. WMUA is not now, never has been, and will not in the 
forseeable future disappear because of lack of funding. WMUA was 
funded $38,413.00 by the Senate this year, a figure they were quite happy 
with. The statement by the Board of Summer Editors is irresponsible. 

2] Throughout the whole difficult process of trying to change their 
budget Marc Berman and the oeoole of WMUA have been extremely 
helpful and understanding. The only "politics, personal vendettas or other 
such hyperbole" seem to be coming from the Collegian. 

Bryan Harvey 

Student Senator for 

Northeast Area 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



TELEPHONE 545 1982 
BUSINESS 545 0617 




VOLUME I, ISSUE IV 



AMHERST, MA 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 1975 




I 






The Paul Winter Consort: see page 6 



•CampUS Center Probe- student audit called for: see page 3 
• Patriots in EmerSOn- despite opposition: see page 5 
•Equality in Sports- is there any at UMass: see page 7 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 16. 1975 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



spotlight: John O'Keefe 



Student power, or impotence 



? 



By Cliff Skibinsky 

John O'Keefe is the president of the 
Student Government Association, and, 
through his office, is the only studen . .rustee 
of UMass Amherst. Thus, he probably wields 
more political power than any otiier student 
on campus. His view of the political situation 
at the University will be an important factor 
in shaping events this fall. 

O'Keefe expressed his views in an in- 
terview last week in his small office in the 
Student Union. Also present were Staff 
Assistant Dorthy Muller, and "Secretary of 
State" Henry Ragin. 

"We're sick of the paternalistic, third-rate 
relationship we have. Students are at the 
bottom of any kind of run as far as decision 
making is concerned," said O'Keefe. He 
claims that most of the committees which 
are supposedly disigned to give students a 
voice in the decision making process are 
useless: "They have no power, and their 
recommendations are ignored." 

CONGUMA (the Committee on Ad- 
missions and Goals for UMass) was cited as 
an example of this paternalistic attitude: "We 
asked for ir creased student represen- 
tation.. .they i r ; Med it as a joke," he said. 

Regin clai.. J that the committee was 
controlled by the University "middle 
management", and Muller stated that two 
undergrads and one graduate student who 
were on the committee were "tokens". 

O'Keefe said that even when recom 
mendations are made by these, committees 
"little to none of them a. ■ ever im- 
plemented", or they "bear little or no 
resemblance to what the students had in 
mind." 

He cited the "termination of the commuter 
affa ; s office." This office, O'Keefe claimed, 
is the only section of Whitmore which 
"serviced a broad spectrum of student 
needs." Arbitrarily, Dr. Robert Gage, Vice- 
Chancellor for Student Affairs, decided to do 
away with the office, siid O'Keefe. 

O'Keefe suggested that the reason for the 
elimination of Commute Affairs lay in that 
Dr. Helen Hills, director or Commuter Affairs, 
was sympathetic to the needs and wants of 
the students, and, with a small staff and 
limited budget, did a great deal for them. 
Because this made offices with large budgets 



and staffs which "don't do anything" look 
bad, the Commuter Affairs Office was 
eliminated, and Dr. Hills was fired, he said. 

Not only are students impotent in dealing 
with planning committees, said O'Keefe, 
they also do not have an effective voice in 
the formal governance system, i.e., the 
undergraduate, graduate, and faculty 
senates ; the chancellor's office, the 
president's office, and the trustees. Any 
move for change must be approved by all of 
these. "Basically it's a joke," said O'Keefe. 
The system is "too slow, it's not taken 
seriously, and it's ignored." 

O'Keefe accuses the administration of 
ignoring the Wohman Document on Self- 
Governance, designed to insure student 
participation in the decision making process. 

Student independence is linked to student 
control over the Student Activities Trust 
Fund (SATF), claims O'Keefe. Every un- 
dergraduate pays $55.50 a year into the fund, 
and the money is used to pay for RSO 
programs such as WMUA and the Collegian. 
As it now stands, the administration and 
trustees have veto power over the uses to 
which this money is put. Thus, says O'Keefe, 
they can freeze, cut back, or eliminate 
student programs' and the students can do 
nothing about it. Whether or not students 
participate in the governance process, they 
can have no real power as long as the 
trustees and administration maintain control 
over the students' money, he said. 

O'Keefe feels that the true extent of the 
students' lack of power will become known 
when the $37.5 million budget cut ordered by 
the Dukakis administration takes full effect. 
The amount cut from UMass Amherst will be 
about$6 million, and, said O'Keefe, "We got 
word that an 18 or 19 per cent cut is coming 
down through student affairs." 

O'Keefe predicts that when the cuts are 
made, they will affect "alternative student 
programs and student employees" instead of 
the "fat in the middle level management, 
faculty, and other areas." 

It will be easier for the administration to 
take services away from the now powerless 
students, said O'Keefe, than to cut faculty, 
who may soon have a legally recognized 
union, or to cut the physical plant, which has 



a union. And there is so much "internal 
squabbling" in Whitmore 'hat "they can't lay 
off- their own people" even though there are 
more than a few bureaucrats that "aren't 
doing anything," he said. 

"Before any cuts are made.. .we want to 
know where they're going to be, and why, 
and we want to be able to come ud with our 




Debbie Schafer 



"We're sick of the paternalistic, 
third-rate relationship we have. 
Students are at the bottom of any 
kind of run as far as decision making 
is concerned." 

-John O'Keefe 

own proposals," said O'Keefe. But he claims 
that students can not get information nor 
take part in the budget making process. 
Every time they try, said O'Keefe, the ad- 
ministration uses the "management 
perogative rap" to eliminate student par- 
ticipation. 

If the administration does not agree to deal 
with student demands militant action may be 
necessary: "It has occurred to us, from 



dealing with them, that the only way we can 
get anything done is to force ourselves on 
them," said Ragin. This could include 
student strikes, tuiton withholding and 
building occupations, according to O'Keefe. 
Ragin rejects the claim that the students 
are apathetic. "Last spring indicated that 
there are a lot of students interested in 
student power on this campus, as nebulous a 
concept as that may be," 'ie said. 

O'Keefe accused the administration of 
viewing the University as a "happy valley" of 
apathetic students, while, in reality, students 
were looking for a vehicle for asserting their 
rights. 

O'Keefe thinks that formal student 
unionization is a long way off. But he does 
feel that students, angered by the ad- 
ministration's failure to view them as a viable 
force, will come together in a "union of 
spirit" to assert their rights. 

Although he would not outline a formal 
plan of action by which the Student 
Government would organize •students and 
advance student interests, O'Keefe said that 
such a plan does exist. But to reveal it now 
would cause the administration to take 
counter measures, he said. 

O'Keefe did, however, describe some of 
the other programs which the SGA is un- 
dertaking or planning: 

- Legal Services — Before the Board of 
Trustees is a bill which states that "the Board 
of Trustees shall not preclude legal services 
from the right to sue the University or defend 
students in criminal actions." The trustees 
will vote on the matter in August and, 
depending on the vote, the SGA will pursue 
it in court. 

- Student Government — There will be 
open elections for SGA representitives in 
October. In addition, the SGA Constitution 
will be rewritten. O'Keefe claims that the 
SGA in its present form is too bureaucratic 
and inbread, and that there is a lack of 
communication between the Government 
and the student body. He said that the SGA 
has not acted as a advocacy body for the 
students, and has no goals, but, rather, 
reacts only to crisis. 

continued on page 14 



UMass Medical School 



To fund or not to fund 



By Bill Der.smore 

The decision by the D' 
administration not to recommend 
$5.5 million dollars in 1976 to open 
the UMass Medical School 
teaching hospital was actually 
made several months ago. And the 
decision is a cut to the basic 
philosophy of health care, not just 
money. 

At the heart of the dispute 
between Dukakis and UMass 
President Robert C. Wood (who 
wants to open the hospital in the 
fall) are policy questions: how manv 



students; what kind of medical 
-vices by how large a resident 
aff; how many nurses and para- 
medicals; all leading to the final 
question, what cost health care? 
What Sen. James A. Kelly Jr. ID- 
Oxford) is forcing Wood and 
Education Secretary Paul Parks to 
do is come to grips with what the 
hospital's mission is to be. 

Several studies have shown that 
the Worcester area, with at least 
five other hospitals, has plenty of 
hospital beds for its population, 
although it lacks sophisticated 
research-style care that a teaching 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



EDITORS 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

ADVERTISING 

CONTRIBUTORS 



Dan LaBonte, Debbie Schafer 

Ken Shapiro 

Alan Anastos, Peter Birnbaum 



Cliff Skibinsky, Richard Wright, Judy Boucher, Bill Densmore, Sue 
Genser, Sue Adley, Andy McKenzie, Mike Kostek, John McHale, Stu 
Cudlitz, Mike Moyle, Kris Jackson, E. Patrick McQuaid, Rob Melacasa, 
Aaron Huber, Peter Belsito, Edward Cohen, David Sokol, Robert 
Golner, John Fischer, Brian Harvey. 

Summer newspaper of the University of Massacnusetts. The staff is 

responsible for its content and no faculty member or administrator 

reads it for accuracy or approvl prior to publication. Unsigned 

editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not necessar.ly 

ef lect the views of the student body, faculty, or administration. Signed 

ditorials, columns, reviews, cartoons, and letters represent the per 

>nal views of the authors. 

The office of the Massachusetts Summer Collegian is on the second 
floor of the Student Union on the campus of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 01002, telephone: 545 1982. 



hospital would presumably provide. 

UMass wants to provide the 

sophisticated - and expensive - 



News analysis 



i 

state-of-the-art style medical care 
and price hospital room rates and 
associated services low enough to 
attract plenty of patients to the 
school's beds. The hospital with 
some 400 beds planned, would be 
► in direct competition with the 
private hospitals in Worcester for 
normal patients, but would take on 
their more difficult cases. 

Parks, on the other hand, sees no 
reason why the state should 
subsidize the cost of providing care 
so that the school's hospital can 
pick and choose its patients. He 
thinks UMass should be made to 
pay the full cost of caring for 
patients - just as he and Dukakis 
feel UMass as a whole should either 
reduce the cost of educating 
students or find ways to make them 
pay more. 

With these behind the scenes 
feelings as a backdrop, Parks and 
Dukakis refused to recommend any 
expenditures for the hospital's 
planned opening in the fall, thus 
forcing the showdown that is now 
taking place in Senator Kelly's 
House Ways and Means Com- 



mittee. 

The state Rate Setting Com- 
mission says the room charge 
should be $510 per day - com- 
petitive with other area hospitals. 
Whether Wood and the UMass 
people will find that rate acceptable 
remains to be seen. 

One thing is for sure from 
conversations with Kelly and his 
aides - the hospital will open in the 
fall on some basis - he will be sure 
of that. In a time of austerity, it 
doesn't make sense to let a multi- 
million dollar facility sit unused. 



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in CC investigation 

Student audit 
team sought 



By Richard Wright 

In response to the direct exclusion of an 
undergraduate member being appointed by 
Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery to the 
special investigative team looking into the 
management operations of the Campus 
Center, the Student Government 
Association President John O'Keefe has 
sought and received an appropriation from 
the Senate Executive committee of $900 to 
hire a special undergraduate audit team of its 
own. 

This action has been deemed one alter- 
native to be considered by the SGA office 
staff following their failure to reach an 
agreement with the University administrators 
or the special audit team's director, Kenneth 
H. Dean, in appointing an undergraduate 
member to the special investigative unit 
established by Bromery as a result of "a year 
of allegations and rumors" he said he had 
grown concerned about. 

The special audit by the investigative team 
is expected to be completed during the first 
week of August according to the team's 
director Kenneth Dean. 

Dean said the early August deadline was 
"to allow the Campus Center to implement 
recommendations prior to school starting 
again." 

O'Keefe said if they decided to hire an 
undergraduate team to look into the 
allegations of mismanagement in the 
Campus Center a report would not be ready 
before the end of September. 

Press reports from last month stated the 
SGA president's staff were awaiting a 
response from Bromery on their inquiry into 
the lack of an undergraduate member on the 
team. According to O'Keefe's staff Bromery 
wrote back to them saying "it wasn't 
necessary for students to be on the audit 
team." 

In later contacts with Bromery and with 
Warren W. Gulko director of budget for 



UMass O'Keefe's staff said the two men had 
said it was alright with them if a student was 
on the audit team if it was okay with Dean 
the team director. However the 
spokesperson said "They weren't too terribly 
enthused." 

O'Keefe said they acted as if we were 
questioning their integrity, "and we were." 

O'Keefe said students pay well over a 
million dollars for the Campus Center in the 
form of a Campus Center fee. 

"We asked them to spell out their criteria 
for selecting members to the team and we 
would find a student to meet those 
requirments," said O'Keefe. 




The response irom Dean was that the 
team was too far along in the process said 
O'Keefe. 

"We were already half-way done with the 
study," said Dean. "We had worked out 
team members responsibilities," by the time 




"The teem was never organiied to begin with to be a representative body of the 
cempus. It is more of a professional consulting team, not a committee or a hearing." 

-Ken Deen 



O'Keefe approached us Dean said. 

"The team was never organized to begin 
with to he a representative body of the 
campus," said Dean. "It is more of a 
professional consulting team, not a com- 
mittee or a hearing," he added. 

"It never crossed my mind to have 

epresentatives," said Dean. "They were 

chosen by their area of expertise," he added. 

The five member team includes Dean who 
has been acting director of Residential Life 
and who was an acting director of the 
Campus Center for a period in 1973 prior to 
the hiring of the present director, John W. 
Corker. 

Other team members are Robert Plattner, 
Associate Professor of General Business and 
Finance; Albert Wrisley, Associate Profes- 
sor in Hotel, Restaurant and Travel Ad- 
ministration; Gordon Gillett, graduate 
student in accounting and Michael Gregory, 
graduate student in business administration. 

Dean said although the final choice on 
team members was his, he discussed 
possible candidates with Associate Professor 
Stevenson W. Fletcher, head of the Hotel, 
Restaurant and Travel Administration 
department, and with George S. Odiorne, 
Dean of the School of Business Ad- 
I ministration. 

' O'Keefe expressed concern in a Collegian 
interview Monday that a self-examination by 
the Campus Center would not be enough. 

continued on page 15 




Student 
Unionization? 



Student Senate 
Executive Committee 



"When it rains it pours 



By Judy Boucher 

A faculty designed roof coupled 
with heavy downpours Monday 
and Tuesday caused major leaking 
problems near the Campus Center 
information desk. 

Campus Center Director John 
Corker said the leaking roof on the 
concourse level have been a 
problem since the building opened 
in 1970, but the current steady 
trickles in the building was the 
"worst." 

Campus Center maintenance 
crevys put up a ptasjic urnbrelja with. 



a punctured hole in the center and 
barrels underneath to catch the 
running water. 

Corker in a telephone interview 
said the leakage did not constitute a 
hazard except the "wet floors." 

To remedy the situation, he said, 
was a "long term solution" that 
would involve a study and' a new 
design of the entire roof. 

The roof is made out of concrete 
covered with flag stone and has 
plastic membranes inside that is 
suppose to carry water, but is 
punctured in many different places. 



By Dan LaBonte 

The Student Senate Executive 
Committee voted to allocate $4,500 
to establish a Summer Organizing 
Project, to be a subgroup of the 
Student Organizing Project, (SOP) 
and laid down a series of project 
goals and structural guidelines for 
the remainder of the summer. 

The 5-1-0 vote passed the 
proposal which came from Student 
Government Association (SGA) 
president John O'Keefe at the 
executive committee meeting on 
Sunday. 

The funds for the Summer 
Project, which will deal with 
student organization and essentially 
replace the now inactive Student 
Organizing Committee, will come 
from the Student Organizing 
Project's $52,000 FY 76 budget. 

The SOP's budget was originally 
"frozen" in early June due to an 
apparent lack of productivity and 
organization from and within the 
SOC, also a subgroup of SOP. "We 
froze the SOP budget because it 
took three months to organize the 
organizing committee," according 
to O'Keefe. 

The SOP budget had to be 
"unfrozen" in order to allocate 
funds for the Summer Project. 

In reference to the Summer 
Project, coordinator John Fisher 
said "It is imperative that we get on 
with the concepts and 
organizational aspects of forming a 
union; a group that will have real 
clout when dealing with the ad- 
ministration." 

Exec. comm. member Ken 
Somers, who cast the only vote 



against the proposal, termed the 
Summer Project "a waste of money 
and a waste of people's effort." 

The goals of the Summer 
Organizing Project, which will 
consist of 12 students and Fisher as 
coordinator, are to "obtain as much 
information as possible that can be 
communicated to the students- 
community so as to educate, 
heighten interest, pinpoint the 
sources of our economic-academic 
oppression, and to organize in 
various are.is so as to deal with 
these oppressive conditions," 
according to the document. 

The project will consist of three 
main areas: Organization, 
Research, and Economic. 

Research is expected to look into 
the proposed budget cuts and their 
effect on both the state and local 
level as well as the entire budget 
process including a flow chart 
outlining hierarchial authority 
levels. The research area will also 
look into the role of the legislature, 
the president and trustees, 
chancellor, vice-chancellor, dept. 
heads, deans, faculty, grads, TAs, 
and undergrads, and the possible 
conflict of interest within the roles 
of all UMass governance groups. 

Of the $4,500 allocated to the 
Summer Project, $900 of the ex- 
penditures will go toward a 
completely student-run audit of the 
Campus Center-Student Union 
operations. There is currently a 5- 
member investigation team, ap- 
pointed by Chancellor Randolf 
Bromery and headed by former 
acting director of the Office of 
Residential Life Kenneth Dean, that 



includes Dean, two professors, and 
two grad students. No un- 
dergraduates are on the select team 
presently investigating the Campus 
Center. 

Economically, the Summer 
Project will explore the feasability 
of a Job bank and institute an in 
depth analysis of the towing and 
parking situation at UMass. An 
economic study of the Textbook 
Annex is also expected. 

Although the Summer Project's 
Organization area is only tentative, 
plans are to examine student 
unionization, department 
organization, state, community, 
and school lobby organization, and 
tenant organizing. 

Positions on the Summer 
Organizing Project are open to all 
students and applications can be 
picked up in the Student Senate 
office. The deadline is July 21. 

In other Senate action, the Exec, 
comm. voted: 

-to authorize the printing of 50 
newly amended constitutions. 

-to allocate a maximum of $540 
for the purpose of a mailing to all 
UMass Amherst students in August 
concerning the budget. 

-to authorize the implementation 
of the proposal for movie 
guarantees for non-SATF (Student 
Activities Tax Fund) funded and 
non-Area Gov't RSO groups. 

-to increase the pay of the SGA 
president's asst. by 100 per cent, 
from $50 to $100 per week. 

-to loan $270 to the North Village 
Day Care Center and to allocate 

continued on page 14 



Notices 



TH 



E MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN _ 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 16. 1W< 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, T975 



NOTICES 
CUBAN FILMS 

Tonight, Wed., July 16, at 8:00 p.m. 
there will be three short Cuban films 
shown in room 163 Campus* Center. 
Everyone invited. 
TASTE STUDY 

How sensitive is your taste 
system? Volunteers ages 48-56 or 66 
88 are needed to participate in taste 
study. Psycn. experimental credit 
available to students. Call 545 2772 
(days) 253-2846 (evenings). Thanks. 
WOMEN AGAINST FBI AND 
GRAND JURY ABUSE 

There will be a panel discussion on 
Women and the Grand Juries on 
Wed., July 16 at 7:30 p.m. in room 



231, Herter Hall. UMass. Panelists 
will be Nancy Brockway of the Grand 
Jury Information Project and Janet 
R if kin of the Women's Law Center. 
BISEXUAL WOMEN'S RAP GROUP 

Meets every Monday night at 7:30 
in the Campus Center for informal 
rap. Check Campus Center room list 
near elevators for exact location. 
GRADUATE STUDENT EM- 
PLOYEES ORGANIZING COM- 
MITTEE (C.S.E.O.C.) 

Meeting Thursday, July 17, 
Campus Center 811 at 3 p.m. Come 
find out how freezes and budget cuts 
affect T.A., S.A., R.A. positions this 
year, and how unionizing can fight 
All graduate students welcome. 



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Dept. of Public Safety 

No summertime slowdown 



By Sue Genser 

Summer i? usually the time when 
Captain Rouert Joyce, of the 
University Department t>f Public 
Safety feels a lull, but not this year. 
The Department of Public Safety 
is "more active now than ever," 
according to Joyce. 

The department will be starting 
several new areas of service in the 
fall, and is getting them organized 
this summer. To begin with, a new 
"fingerprint and photograph file" 
will be in use, involving "anyone 
we've ever done business with 
(since 1973)", Joyce said. The file 
will classify people by age groups, 
hair color, scars, and other 
characteristics, and will be used in 
an attempt to cut down on crime 
and criminals. 

In the fall, the departmerit .. 
starring what Joyce terms an 
"advocacy system," to combat 
rape and help the victims of rapists. 
Different entities on campus - the 
Everywoman's Center, Health 
Services, Psychological Services — 
are being asked for assistance. A 
pool of representatives from each 
area is currently being chosen, by 
each department itself, and training 
seminars are set to start in October. 
The department has recently 
completed computerizing all it's 
records, so that it is now possible to 
"predict what is going to happen", 
according to Joyce. Any applicable 
conditions, such as the time of 
year, the frequency of incidents, 
occurence, location, object, and 
relation to past years and events, 
are being used to prevent crimes 
from being committed. 

"Because of the data-base we 
have," Joyce said, "we are now 
trying to prevent crimes by being 
there before they happen." 

UMass is one of very few 
university police departments in the 
country who are able to do this. 

Department of Public Safety 
representatives will meet this 
summer with every area director 



BELL'S PIZZA HOUSE J 




"Sr 



••»•* POLICE 



-v 



* 

* 
* 

* 
* 

* 



***•*******************************# 



„ _._ v2&% ■__ 



and all dormitory Heads of 
Residence. The purpose of these 
get-togethers is to show the ad- 
ministrators and staff "what goes 
on here, and to open line* of 
communication", said Joyce. "This 
minimizes confusion when a 
problem or emergency does arise. 

Then come the more ordinary, 
but equally necessary tasks. 
"Preventive Maintenance" is done 
on all equipment. Beats and 
districts along with the mounted 
police units are reviewed for ef- 
fectiveness. Community related 
programs will be dealt with, fire 
equipment updated, and police and 
security guards trained. Crime 
prevention surveys are taken, and 
problems recorded during the 
school year are checked into. 

Along with all this, the depart- 
ment is providing security for 
summer school, freshmen orien- 
tation, and visiting conference. 

"We still cover all of campus," 
Joyce said. "There are roving 
guards in each area." 

The mounted police units which 
were not ready for night-time use 
until the end of last semester, are 
now used both during day and 



wcx 



night. 

During the summer, the same as 
the rest of the year, larceny is the 
biggest on-campus crime, 
"because people still don't lock 
their (dorm, room) doors," ac- 
cording to Joyce. However the 
department receives calls for 
everything, although in less volume 
than during the school year. For the 
month of June alone, the depart 
ment had received more than 560 
calls, including emergencies. Most 
calls occur at night between 7:00 
p.m. and 2:00 a.m. 

Last year was an extremely active 
year for the department, because 
more crimes were being reported, 
according to Joyce. Because of 
better community cooperation, 
there was more recovery of stolen 
property, and more frequent 
arrests. Joyce hopes this trend will 
continue in the future. 

"As far as the summer goes," 
Joyce concluded, "it certainly is 
not a case of us having nothing to 
do." 



0*+ m*m0m+i 



UMass gets burned 

Elevating Platform Fire Truck 

deleted from state budget 



By Sue Adley 

An elevating platform fire truck 
for the town and mainly the 
University was cut from the 
proposed budget by Education 
Secretary Paul Parks' office. It did 
not appear in the yearly state 
budget sent to the legislature by 
Governor Dukakis. 

Plans were made almost a year 
ago by UMass officials to ask the 
state to appropriate funds for the 
vehicle. The new North Fire 
Station, to be completed in Oc- 
tober, was to house the new fire 
truck. 

Bill Lambert, Physical Plant 
employee and chairman of the 
building committee for the new fire 
station, told the architect "to 
design parking especially for the 
new truck." 

"The University intended to give 
the truck to the town." Lambert 
said. "It shows on the priority list. 
Funding, however, is not the 
University's perrogative. The town 
as a town doesn't need the truck. 
They need it to serve UMass. I think 
the main question now is how the 
University will get this item re- 
instated in the budget," Lambert 
added. 

Jack Doherty, Chief of the 
Amherst Fire Department, told the 
Collegian that "the intended use of 
the fire truck was generated entirely 
by the University." "We can't talk 
in terms of danger," he said, 
"because that can't be predicted. 
There is potential for events to 
occur, though. What potential I 
can't say. I know that right now 
we're unable to cope with buildings 
over seven stories.'' 

Doherty said he feels "there's 



hope" in getting tne truck in the 
future. "I think the letter to the 
state rep from the town manager 
was 100 per cent complete and 
accurate," he said. "I fully support 
that letter." 

The letter he spoke of was one 
written to Sen. John Olver and 
Rep. James Collins from Tem- 
porary Town Manager Steven 
Sheiffer. In that letter Sheiffer. 
explains, "The need for the 



existing ground ladders and 1953 
ladder truck are sufficient. 

"There does not appear to be an 
operational alternative to the 
acquisition of the elevating plat- 
form truck. The town's existing 
1953 ladder truck and ground 
ladders are not adequate. There are 
ladder trucks available in 
Easthampton and Northampton. 
The response time would be in 
excess of 15 minutes and the 



■:•:•;'• 



... > -■. ' 



7f's a matter of priorities. ..and the 

Education Secretary has stated 
his priorities. " - Gulko 



mm 

elevating platform truck is criticial 
and is almost solely based upon 
state-owned buildings located on 
the university campus. There are 
dozens of university buildings such 
as the Orchard Hill, South West 
and Sylvan residential complexes, 
housing approximately 8,000- 
10,000 students, which are well in 
excess of four stories (seven to 21 
stories). 

These structures do not meet the 
standards of fire safety spelled out 
in the recently enacted State 
Building Code. The structures do 
not have sprinkler systems nor 
smoke detector systems. 

"Off campus, there is little, if any, 
need for this piece of fire apparatus. 
There are approximately one half 
dozen non-University of 
Massachusetts buildings of four 
stories in town. Several of these are 
on the Amherst College campus. 
For each of these, the town's 



ladders are not of sufficient height. 
There is a snorkel truck available in 
West Springfield, but the travel 
time is approximately 45 minutes. 
Helicopters are not available within 
30 minutes not at night." 

Warren Gulko, Budget Director 
for the University, said that "the 
University has done everything 
possible to support their request" 
for the fire truck. "It was a 
legitimate request," Gulko said, 
"and a needed piece of equipment. 
It's a matter of priorities where the 
state puts its limited funds, and the 
Secretary of Education has stated 
his priorities. At some time we'll get 
the truck, I just don't know when. If 
not this year, maybe the next. This 
is something the Commonwealth 
should do for the University and the 
town of Amherst. I'd say the matter 
is pretty much out of our hands." 



Despite opposition 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Patriots in Emerson 



This year, damages 
will be payed for 



By Susan Genser 

The New England Patriots will be 
arriving here this Friday to begin 
their six-week summer training 
session, and for the third year, they 
are staying in Emerson House. 
However, this year, there is 
something new; the residents of 
Emerson have a contract with the 
university to cover any damages 
incurred during the Patriots stay. 

In an unprecedented move, 
according to Robert Campbell, 
Operations Manager for the Office 
of Residential Life, (ORL), the ORL 
has issued a "Memo of Un- 
derstanding" signed by university 
officials and Emerson residents. 
The agreement provides for 
preparation by the university, of 
any damages, and total restoration 
of the dorm for student occupancy 
in September. In recognition of the 
residents' projects to redecorate 
the lounges, the agreement also 
provides Emerson with $1,000 to 
continue dorm improvement 
projects. 

Over the past two years, 
residents have been asking that the 
Patriots not be housed in Emerson, 
"because of the damage they've 
done," according to Emerson 
House Council President Kimberly 
Popkin. 

Last semester, however, the 
Patriots housing issue became a 
real problem, for several reasons: 

— because of damage done to 
personal student property, stored 
for the summer. in a supposedly 
locked Storage room. 

— failure on the part of the 
university to keep certain promises 
made to Emerson to restore the 
dorm for the students. 

— most important, fear of 
damage to the lounges, recently 
renovated by the students, the 
residents decided to take stronger 
action. 

A petition requesting that the 
Patriots not be housed in Emerson 
was circulated, and signed by 
three-fourths of the residents. The 
residents called a meeting in late 
April, with university officials to 
discuss the past damages, and 
other housing alternatives for the 

Patriots. 

Arthur Warren, Acting Director 
of Food Services, has been the 
mediator between the Patriots and 
University .administration for three 
years. At that time, Warren was 
"instrumental in keeping the 
Patriots here", he said, when the 
question of them training 
somewhere else arose. Both the 
Patriots and the University had 
wanted one contact person, and 
since he had handled that problem 
"satisfactorily to both sides", he 
feels, Warren was asked to con- 
tinue as mediator. 

Warren is responsible for 
overseeing the Patriots' housing 
needs, meals, providing tran- 
sportation to and from the health 
services for physicals, checking on 
the condition of the fields, and 
changing field dimensions to fit the 
requirements for a professional 
team. 

After the meeting in Emerson, 
Patriots representatives were 
contacted by Warren "to come 
look at alternatives". Herman 
Bruce, Patriots business manager, 
and Coach James Valek, came to. 
UMass at the end of April. Their 
initial response, according to 
Warren, was that they liked Moore 
House, but would have to confer 
with the rest of the staff. 

Shortly afterwards, Kenneth 
Dean, then Acting Director of ORL, 
telephoned Emerson Head of 
Residence Marjorie Posner, and 
gave her a verbal agreement that 
the Patriots would not stay in 
Emerson this summer. Warren also 
told another Emerson resident, "the 
matter is out of your hands now." 

According to Warren, Patriots 
Head Coach.and General Manager 
Chuck Fairbanks had decided 



Emerson was the "most suitable" 
dorm that met the Patriots 
requirements. The Patriots wanted 
a dorm with nearby parking 
facilities, that was also close to the 
dining commons and stadium. 

The other dorms that fit the 
requirements and were considered 
by the Patriots were Moore, James, 
and Melville, all Southwest low- 
rises. They were rejected by the 
Patriots for various reasons, in 
favor of Emerson. 

The problem with Moore, was 
the unsuitable dorm layout. The 
Patriots management need private 
conference rooms, Warren ex- 
plained, and in Moore, the 
management would have had to go 




"The university is saying 
that the project to 
redecorate the lounges is 
not as important as the 
profit we will receive from 
the Patriots." 

-Kimberly Popkin 

through the player's lounge. 

Melville was "inconvenient", 
Warren said, because - "it was too 
far away, and the Patriots did not 
want to walk the extra distance". 
The "extra distance" was 
calculated by the Physical Plant to 
be between 250 and 275 feet. 

"The players are usually 
thoroughly exhausted q after 
practice," Warren explained. Some 
have lost as mucha s 15 pounds in 
one afternoon. They are also on a 
very tight time schedule." 

The issue became a toss-up 
between Emerson and James, 
according to Warren. After James 
had been evaluated by Patriots 
personnel, it was assessed that it 
would have cost the university too 



much to clean, repaint, and prepare 
James for the Patriots. It was also 
work not scheduled for the physical 
plant. 

Because Emerson was already 
equipped with the converted 
outlets, it was decided jointly by 
Dean and 'Richard Green, Master- 
Director of Southwest to house the 
Patriots there. 

The university is operating on 
two premises, according to Warren. 
"One, we wanted to keep the 
Patriots here. They bring in 
revenue, and cut down on costs 
during the school year, and it's 
good for public relations." 

The second premise was that the 
university wanted to "work things 
out with the students before they 
left," Warren said. "Our main 
concern was for the students, not 
the Patriots." 

Posner and Popkin, do not believe 
this. "The University chose the 
desires of a private institution, over 
a group of students who put time, 
energy, and effort, into the dorm, 
and renovating it. It's a fault in our 
society as to where we lay our 
priorities," Posner said. 

Popkin corroborated these 
statements. "The dorm is more 
than a place* to live, it's also an 
educational center. The project to 
redecorate the lounges was an 
educational experience. The 
university is saying that this project 
is not as important as the profit we 
will receive from the Patriots." 

The meeting to discuss demands 
and draw up an agreement was 
called by Posner. In spite of it's 
being only a supportive contract, 
Warren refused to sign on the 
grounds that he was unable to 
follow through on it. "In short, he 
couldn't even indicate his support 
of the residents" Popkin said. 




"We wanted to keep the Patriots here. They bring in 
revenue, cut down on costs during ths school year, and If s 
good for public relations." 

Arthur Warren 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY lfi r ip 7 < 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



The Paul Winter Consort 

their music is music for a "Whole" Earth 



In Concert 

The Paul Winter Consort 

Fine Arts Center Auditorium 

Fine Arts Center 

Auditorium 
Thursday, July 10 

by Your Sacred Cowboy 
and Mike Kostek 

The phrase "Whole Earth Music" 
can be applied to Paul Winter's 
group and their music on a number 
of levels. First and most obvious is 
the variety of sounds, styles, and 
instruments, influences ranging 
from Africa to Asia to Argentina 
and from baroque to be-bop, which 
they bring to their music; their 
collection of percussion in- 
struments alone takes hours to be 
set up for a performance. The 
second aspect is one of attitude, 
the intuitive knowledge that there is 
balance, order, and most of all unity 
underlying all things in nature, from 
human, beast, and plant to the very 
rocks and soil of the Earth. If that 
sounds mystical, it's because it is, 
sort of, and we'll talk about that 
more in the interview below, but it 
is important to mention it here 
before talking about their July 10 
concert; important because their 
music is music for a "whole" Earth. 

It's hard to say where the 
audience came from; not all just 
summer students, certainly, as the 
whole main floor of the huge Fine 
Arts Center auditorium (about 1500 
seats) was filled, as well as a 
couple, sitting behind us, were very 
knowledgable about the Consort, 
but the majority of the audience 
didn't appear to be there as Consort 
fans; at least the applause was very 
scatered when they opened the 
concert with "Icarus", probably 
their best-known composition and 
the title of their last album. But if 
the audience wasn't made up of 
Concort fans at the beginning, it 
was, beyond a doubt, some two- 
and-a-half hours and two encores 
later. I have never seen an audience 
at UMass so heartily responsive to 



something new and different. 

One of the reasons for the 
Cor sort's audience success is that 
they are as exciting to watch as 
they are to listen to. Paul Winter 
and David Darling provide most of 
the melody, on saxes and electric 
cellos, respectively (and chalk up 
one new experience right there; I, at 
least, have never heard an electric 
cello, and certainly not one with a 
wah-wah pedal and an echoplex), 



bells, cuecas, kettle drums, 
crotales, gourds and more, all in 
one night. All of the Concort 
members took a hand or two at 
them, particularly Robert Chappel, 
who did a "Conversation for 
Percussion" with Tigger Benford 

which inspired the first of several 
standing ovations. Central to t...s, 
and constantly returned to 
throughout the evening, was a 
large wooden xylophone, originally 



position; second encore brought us 
full circle: Bach's "Aire on a G- 
String" and finally, once again 
"Icarus". 

The legend of Icarus is well- 
known; he was the boy who made 
wings of feathers and wax, and 
who flew to close to the sun so that 
the wings melted and he fell into 
the sea. In the composition 
"Icarus" the legend has been 
altered: Icarus simply flies higher 




Herb Bushier sat in for Ben Carrion 
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handled a large part of the per- 
cussion. I say "a large part" 
because no one person could have 
played all those gongs, drums, 
tablas, surdos, congas, afuches, 




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from Uganda, called an amadinda; 
it is designed to be played by two 
people simultaneously, each sitting 
on the floor on opposite sides of it. 
Benford and Chappel worked up to 
an amazingly complex high-speed 
interchange on this and finally, 
without missing a beat, raised their 
arms and began playing, at the 
same frantic pace, on each other's 
drumsticks in mid-air. 

On the lighter side, there was an 
interesting experiment as the 
Consort improvised backgrouond 
music to the performance of two 
jugglers. The jugglers were over- 
nervous or under-rehearsed and 
had a lot of trouble keeping 
anything going for more than a few 
seconds, but tried hard enough to 
win the audience over anyway, and 
the Consort did a fine job of playing 
off them, mistakes and all. 

The climax of the evening began 
with the performance of a piece in 
which Winter made a poetic plea 
for the many endangered species of 
the Earth while recordings of the 
cries and call of these same species, 
from whales to wolves, were played 
over the music. As the yelping of 
the wolves, was being played, 
Winter explained that the howl of 
the wolf was not a threatening 
sound, but a social one, and that 
wolves had almost never been 
known to attack humans. "When 
was the last time you had a good 
howl?" he asked, and thereby set 
off a cacophony of wails, yelps, and 
of course, howls from the audience 
"that went on for so long that he had 
. to wave for quiet. This was only 
partially achieved, as many 
members of the audience seemed 
to be finding some sort of 
therapeutic value in what they were 
doing, but Winter managed to 
channel the howling into a group 
singing of a song called "Minuit" 
from Guinea, before leading the 
Concort into the thundering final, 
"The Whole Earth Chant". 

Encore, of course, and they 
played an as yet untitled com- 



Debbie Schafer 



and higher, and as the piece ends, 
he is gliding higher still, a per- 
sonification of freedom. 

"Icarus" was composed by 
Ralph Towner, a classical and 
twelve-string guitarist and former 
member of the Consort who left, 
with three other members, to form 
the group known as Oregon. But 
that Winter should choose to begin 
and end each concert with that 
composition says a lot about 
Winter himself. 

A Talk with Paul Winter 

It was almost too too of a place 
to talk to Paul Winter. He of the 
gliding, soaring, natural music that 
comes from villages around the 
globe, and his great ecological 
concerns connecting in the 
dominant theme of his music, 
which is to reacquaint (reconnect?) 
man with his soul. 

So going out of the creeping 
cement of the Fine Arts Center 
down to the banks of the campus 
pond and sitting under one of the 
trees while swans drift by and inch- 
long ants take care of their world is 
almost foreign in its Naturalness. 
The passing of a sunshower of a 
minute's duration was the final 
touch. Could this be UMass? Ah 
sweet sweet. Where else but in 
1975 could a human being think of 
trees and swans as cliches? 

"It's amazing, the difference out 
here," said Paul as we settled 
down. The Consort had just 
finished a three hour set-up and on- 
going sound check. "We really 
prefer playing outdoors. You get 
inside that mausoleum and forget 
where you are. Then you walk out 
here and it's a totally different 
environment." Yes. No hockey 
rinks for the Winter Consort. Their 
music is inspired by inch-long ants, 
sunshowers, midnight longings and 
the subsequent wide-ranging of our 
minds. They're not playing music 
out of asphalt or paneling. It's man 



and nature. Man in na'ure. Nature 
in man. 

"I miss sharing with people. 
There's not too much of that in 
20th century living." Winter is 
speaking wistfully of the days of 
village living, and about Charles 
Ives, a composer in the early 30's 
who created works out of his 
impressions of man and nature. 
"Ives heard chanting, bellowing, 
the music that the people of his 
town made on Sundays." 

Discussion ensues on how the 
media have taken away home- 
grown music, and nationalized out 
culture. What's Number One in 
New York is Number One Peoria. 
We shift through the years, and run 
across people like John Cage, who 
insist that everything is music, and 
the best music is made by the 
people themselves. "Yes, self made 
music is best. The roots of our 
culture are so rootless, really. They 
come from a very fragmented, 
neurotic experience of the Western 
Europeans who brought their 
fragmented, neurotic psychies over 
here and perpetrated themselves on 
a very highly developed people — 
the American Indians. Out of all 
this, though, there is a heretage we 
have that is as powerful as say, the 
blacks have. The spokesmen are 
people like Emerson and Thoreau. It 
was Thoreau who said 'The 
salvation of the earth is in wild- 
ness.' " 

We asked Paul about what he 
sees in the audiences In America — 
how do they react to the music? 
how have they changed in the ten 
years he's been on the road? 

"This is an extraordinary time — 
everything's grown. The audiences 
here are infinitely better than they 
were ten years ago. In 1962 we 
toured Latin America, and the 
people there were wild, wildy 
enthusiastic, Here, we're just 
starting to catch up. The problem 
is, I think, that the different types of 
music were kept apart, and we have 
masses of people not knowing who 
the hell they are. Things are getting 
better, though. The record industry 
is a confused, self-strangling media, 
but there'll be Ralph Naders in the 
music business yet." 

We asked Paul about a few 'real' 
topics — about their long awaited 
album: "Yes, we really need a new 
one. The next album is called 
Umpawaug Suite. It's a song 
album, with a theme running 
through it. I've worked on it for the 
past three years, so I think it's 
good. Maybe that's too much 
reworking. We'll see. The album is 
built around man and nature, what 
my life is concerned with now." 

We go off into a general 
discussion into recording problems 
— the Consort doesn't come across 
strongly enough on record — due 
to the nature of the medium — and 
the fact that the wide-range of their 
material probably hurts them on 
record. "Most people seem to put 
on a record and experience one 
kind of mood for a while. Say, 
chocolate, for a time." We touch 
on Oregon, a Consort spin-off: "We 
played a show with them a while 
ago. They're also making very 
personal music, and I really like it. 
Yes, we certainly see them as a 
brother band." 

^ Paul speaks of 'filling out" the 
Consort, His ambitions are limited 
only by physical logistics as this 
man is drawing his inspiration from 
the very planet itself. And has the 
potential found in all of humankind. 
"I'm a musical gourmet, studying 
everything. We're not real scholars. 
Anything's in the air - you just 
hold your cup out the window, and 
it fills up. Being a musical gourmet 
works in concert, it always has 
worked. Any human will respond to 
any music's intent". 



Equality in Sports 

Is there equality in athletics at UMass? 



By John McHale 

In 1972 Congress passed an 
Educational Amendments bill. Title 
IX is a portion of that bill which 
forbids discrimination on the basis 
of sex in educational programs or 
activities which receive Federal 
funds. 

Virtually every college, university, 
elementary and secondary school 
and preschool is covered by the 
law, and UMass is no exception. 

Guidelines on how sex 
discrimination elimination is to be 
implemented will have to be 
followed starting this fall. Whereas 
elementary schools across the 
country will have one year to 
comply with the guidelines, 
secondary schools and colleges 
(including UMass) have three years 
to meet the Federal standards fully. 
Hearings in Washington, D.C. on 
possible ramifications of various 
aspects of Title IX's guidelines 
concluded on June 26 of this year. 

Strong negative reaction to the 
then-proposed guidelines came 
from several sources last month 
and some of these opponents 
voiced their opinions at the hearing. 

Darrell Royal, football coach at 
Texas and president of the 
American Football Coaches 
Association, led a contingent of 
seven others who asked Congress 
to declare a moratorium on the 
application of the new rules until 
the Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare could study 
their economic impact on all facets 
of collegiate athletics and the 
financial structure of the colleges 
and universities. 

"Income generated by football is 
a principal source of athletic in- 
come at many colleges and 
frequently finances the entire 
athletic program as well as the 
construction, maintenance and 
debt retirement of facilities," said 
the formal statement signed by the 
eight coaches. 

"In many cases it has provided 
the funds for the present expansion 
of women's athletics. This will no 
longer be possible under the 
H.E.W. regulations." 

When the guidelines go into 
effect, such things as equal op- 
portunity for scholarships will be 
offered women athletes, and this 
could drastically cut the mens' 
share in many cases. 

Vivian Barfield, Assistant 
Director of Athletics at UMass. 
doesn't sympathize with Royal. 
"He and the others are worried 
because they'll be in a less powerful 
position. They're afraid that their 
precious empires and control over 
so many millions of dollars will 
erode. I don't think these guidelines 
will hurt intercollegiate athletics, 
although they will change them. It'll 
be super for the females and for the 
males, too," she said. 

Is there equality in athletics at 




UMass? According to Barfield, 
"Twenty to twenty-five per cent of 
the student's athletic fees are spent 
for gals' sports. All the rest goes for 
mens'. The men had 16 varsity 
sports last year, the women 8." 

The guidelines don't stipulate 
that equal money be spent for both 
sexes — only that equal op- 
portunity is available for both. That 
means that the sports selected 
should reflect the interests and 
abilities of both sexes. Men and 
women will have to equitably 
receive: publicity, housing and 
dining facilities and services, 
medical and training services, 
locker rooms, practice and com- 
petitive facilities, coaching and 
academic tutoring opportunities 
and the assignment and pay of 
coaches and tutors, travel and per 
diem allowances, game and 
practice schedules, and supplies 



and equipment in tne same Sport. 

"We have to evaluate and 
determine if there is equal op- 
portunity as defined by the 
guidelines," said Barfield. "I don't 
feel I know what the women on 
campus want in athletics. We need 
to find out their interests through 
surveys, meetings, and looking at 
club sports to see if these might be 
elevated to the intercollegiate 
level." 

Aside from the fact that Barfield 
thinks that it is deplorable that our 
culture is so weak in ideals that 
equal opportunity for women must 
be legislated, she is entirely in favor 
of what the guidelines do and how 
they do it. "The guidelines are 
written with a humanistic point of 
view," she said. "That is, each 
institution monitors itself and signs 

continued on page 14 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1975 



WEDNESDAY. JULY 16, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Whafs Goto' On 




o 

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■o 



r,r ris Henderson 



Sulaiman Hakim 



The Unity Ensemble 



The Unity Ensemble, .eaturing 
Chris Henderson an ' Sulaiman 
Hakim, will perform j music hour, 
open rehearsal an:.' evening concert 
on Thursday, .July 17. 

Henderson on percussion and 
Sulaiman on saxaphone have been 
working together, leading their own 



group, for the past year. During 
that time they have worked with 
masters like Marion Brown, Roy 
Haynes, Mtune, Max Roach and 
Archie Shepp. 

With Henderson's drumming 
derived from an African concept 
and Sulaiman's alto and soprano- 



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sax going straight ahead, these 
musical craftsmen have combined 
their talents for a new and different 
sound. 

The Ensemble will present a 
music hour on the Campus Center 
Concourse at noon. At 2:00 p.m the 
public is invited to an open 
rehearsal in room 44 of the Fire Arts 
Center. 

The evening performance will 
begin at 8:00 p.m. on Metawampe 
Lawn. The Ensemble will be per- 
forming Black Music of the 40's and 
50's and will be appearing with the 
Maria Blakey Dancers. 

Bring a blanket for seating. 

The concert rain location is the 
Student Union Ballroom. 

Movies 

"AN AUTUMN AFTERNOON" 
by Uasujiro Osu - Wednesday, 
July 16, 8:00 p.m. CC Auditorium. 

A gentle story about a widower's 
decision to marry off his only 
daughter as he turns a lovingly 
malicious eye on ultra-modern 
Japan. Uasujiro Osu's great 
cinematic fresco which so com- 
pletely captures Japan as it is — a 
quality the Japanese themselves 
acknowledge in calling Osu "the 
most Japanese of all Japanese 
directors". 112 m ( n. 



Music 

and 
Dance 
Review 

The Maria Blakey Dancers will 
appear in the Music and Dance 
Review this Thursday, July 17 at 
8:00 p.m. on Metawampe Lawn. 

The Boston based, eight member 
dance troupe was formed just over 
a year ago. After months of hard 
work rehearsing their routines, the 
troupe is gaining national 
recognition. 

They have worked with the Duke 
Ellington Band, The Spinners and 
The Pointer Sisters as well as 
appearing at art festivals and on 
television. On September 16, they 
will open on Broadway at the 
Palace Theatre in the Cab Calloway 
"Cotton Club Show." 

Maria Blakey describes her 
troupe as "a real Jazz company," 
According to Blakey, the troupe is 
versatile enough to do "bumps and 
grinds" as well as classical ballet 
movements. 

The Maria Blakey Dancers will be 
appearing with The Unity Ensemble 
for the Thursday performance. 

The rain location for the event is 
the Student Union Ballroom. 

Jazz 
Band 

1 The annual performance of the 
Preservation Hall Jazz Band has 
become a tradition at UMass. On 
Wednesday, July 23 the "oldest of 
the living old" will make their sixth 
consequetive appearance here with 
an evening concert of original New 
Orleans jazz on Metawampe Lawn 
at 8:00 p.m. 

The five members of Preser- 
vation Hall, all over sixty years old, 
were making music when jazz was 
first emerging in New Orleans 
following the turn of the century. 

The Band includes co-leader 
Percy Humphrey, his brother, 
clarinetist Willie Humphrey, "Big 
Jim" Robinson on trombone, 
drummer "Cie Frazier and James 
Edward "Sing" Miller. 

To hear jazz played by musicians 
who were there when marches, 
quadrilles, blues, spirituals and 
ragtime all merged to what was 
then called "jass" come to the 
outdoor concert on Wednesday. 

In case of rain, the concert will be 
held in the Fine Arts Center Concert 
Hall. 







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Local 



Grove. 




Vi 



Elvin Bishop-Fate - Supermarket (Springfield), July 18 

NRBQ-Travis Shook and the Club Wow - Shea's 

(Chicopee), July 18, 19 

Clean Living - Rusty Nail (Sunderland), July 17-20 

Deadly Nightshade - Rusty Nail, July 16 

Fat - 5th Alarm (Springfield), July 17-19 

Widespread Depression - Rusty Nail, July 22 

Lilith - Lazy River (Northampton) July 17-20 

Big Screamin' McGrew - Crystal Park (Palmer), July 18, 19 

Jac Veronesi with Tom McNamera — Lazy River, July 16 

Some Of My Best Friends - T.O.C. (UMass), July 17-19 

Bottle Hall -Michael O 'Donne - Chelsea House Cafe and Folklore 

Center (W. Brattleboro, Vt.) July 18,19 

Jim K Band - Lazy River, July 22 

Open Road - Steak Out (Amherst), July 16-19 

Forest - Red Pantry (Belchwtown) July 17-19 

Some Of My Best Friends — Supermarket, July 16 

Sunarc — Bernardston Inn (Bernardston), July 18 

Fate — Supermarket, July 17-20 

Evergreen - Red Pantry, July 16 

Truk - Lakeview Inn (Southwick), July 16-20 

American Standard — 4 Leaf Window (New Salem), July 19,20 

Sunarc — Red Pantry, July 22 

Evergreen — Supermarket, July 22 

Tupelo — Red Pantry, July 20 

Discos: 

Top Of The Campus (UMass) - Disco Night Every Wednesday 

Rachid's-(Hadley) - Open Nightly until 1 a.m. 

Maxwell's ( Hadley) — Open Nightly, Jazz Night every Sunday 

Fifth Alarm (Springfield) - Disco Nights: July 16, 21, 22 

Dial Tone Lounge (Hatfield) - Open nightly until 1 a.m. 

Poor Richard's III (Amherst) — Open nightly except Monday 

September's (Chicopee) — Open nightly 



Concerts 



\ 




(T indicates tix available at Ticketron in CC Hotel lobby) 

SPRINGFIELD 
Earth, Wind 8- Fire - July 22, Civic Center T 
The Osmonds-Munch — Aug. 7, Civic Center T 
Miss World U.S.A. Pagent [with Bobby Hope] - Aug. 17, Civic 
Center 

LENOX 
Joan Beaz-Hoyt Ax ton — July 19 T 
Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band — July 23 T 
Bonnie Ra itt — Aug. 9LJL. 
Jerry Jeff Walker - Aug. 16 T 
New Riders Of The Purple Sage - Aug. 30 T 

§£: LENOX, Mass I Tang/ewood] 

James Taylor-Em mytou Harris - July 22 T 
Judy Col/ins-Uv Taylor - July 29 7" 
Linda Rortstadt-Leo Kottke - Aug. 26 T 
David Crosby & Graham Nash — Aug. 29 7" 
Helen Reddy - Aug. 30 T 

BOSTON 
Martha Reeves - July 16-20 (9:30 & 12), Paul's Mall 
^'icy Nelson & Mother Earth — July 17-20, Jazz Workshop 
sther Phillips - July 21-27, Paul's Mall 
_ar/y Coryell — July 31 -Aug. 3, Jazz Workshop 

CAPE COD COLL/SLUM, So. Hyannis, Mass. 
Earth, Wind & Fire - July 18 
Three Dog Night - July 19 
Poco - July 28 
Seals 6- Croft - Aug. 2 



J 



Bicentennial Lecturer 



All events sponsored by Summer Activities are free 
to UMass summer students and fee paying conference 
participants. The general public will be admitted as 
space permits. 



The Preservation Hall Jazz Band 



Here at Fenton's you'll find 
all your tennis needs . . 



"An Overview of the Latin- 
American Experience in America", 
the fifth in a series of Bicentennial 
lectures open to the public, will be 
presented July 22 at 2:00 p.m. in 
the Student Union Colonial 
Lounge. 

Bob Marquez, professor of 
Hispanic Studies at Hampshire 
College, will focus on the major 
segments of the Latin-American 
population in America, including 
Mexican, Cuban and Puerto Rican 
minority groups. 

Marquez will deal primarily with 
the period from 1890 to the present, 
discussing the role of the United 
States in Latin-American countries 
and how that role effects Latin- 
American people. 

Marquez is editor of Caliban: A 
Journal of New World Thought and 
Writing. He is also editor and 
translator of several books of Latin- 
American poetry. 




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At The Arco 

Station Next To 

Campus Plaza 

256-0107 



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ire you getting ripped off? 

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OPEN — 11:00a.m. 12.00 p.m. - Mon. Thurs. 
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10 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDA Y, JULY 16, 197S 



V/EPNESDAY, JULY 16, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



II 



Come to the 

this week ft see: 

SOM £ OF MY 
BEST FRUMPS 

Thurs., Friday £ ft Sat. Nites 
Don't forget on Wednesday Mite: 

TO C PISCO 

NEVER A COVER CHARGE! 



Book & Print 

Fair 

Colonial Lounge 
Student Union Building 

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. 

WED. — THURS. — FRI. 
JULY 23, 24, 25 



HUNDREDS OF BOOKS AT REDUCED 
PRICES. ALL POSTERS & PRINTS 
REDUCED BY V* AND MORE. 




Come in and browse! 

THE UNIVERSITY STORE 

Campus Center 

Univ. of Mass. 

545-2619 



8:30-4:30 
Mon.-Fri. 



WANTED 



ORGANIZERS 



RESEARCHERS 




ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT WORKERS 



12 people are needed to work for the Student 

Student Organizing Comm. and the SGA in order 
to educate and plan organizing for the campus 

and community. 

Jobs will run for at least 6 weeks. Pay is 
$2.50/hr. for 20 hours per week. Applications 
must be filed by 5:00 p.m., July 21, 1975 in 
the Senate Office. 

Work will start shortly thereafter. 



Two artists' conceptions I Off-CampUS housing: a seller's market 



of an artists' convention 



By Mike Moyle 

What is raucous, rowdy, crassly 
commercial, and takes up several 
floors of the Hotel Commodore in 
New York once a year? Why, Phil 
Seuling's Annual Comic Art 
Convention; what else? Your 
Humble Reporter ventured into the 
city in the company of Kris Jack- 
son, to show you how crazy your 
H.R. is. To protect those of weak 
constitutions, I will forgo any at- 
tempts at describing my ride to the 



and the magic words "... and even 
cheaper than listed in the Comics 
Guide!" 

If one has the self-control not to 
be trapped by the siren-like lure of 
the vendors, one ngight even find 
the convention an interesting and 
informative place. 

Your H.R. managed to spend 
some fifteen minutes speaking with 
Mr. Jack Kirby, acknowledged by 
many to be "The King" of comic 
book art. Among his creations, and 



"any function in which the name of the 
organizer comes before the name of the 

function, don't expect to escape with 

your wallet intact/' 



Big Mango on the back of a 
motorcycle optBeted by the 
aforementioned Mr. Jackson. 

Suffice it to say that we arrived in 
reasonable condition and, with 
hardly more than an occasional 
snicker, were admitted on the basis 
of our Collegian credentials. 

Rule 1: If you attend any function 
in which the name of the organizer 
comes before the name of the 
function, do not expect to escape 
with your wallet intact. Upon 
passing through the registration 
line at PS's ACAC one is drawn 
immediately into the Dealers' (to be 
read Hustlers') Room. This is, as 
the name implies, where the un- 
suspecting are bombarded with 
four-color print jobs, glossy paper 



doubtless his most famous, is the 
hero in the red, white and blue long 
Johns, Captain America. Although 
he has created many others since 
beginning the comics, this 1940 
creation will probably be his 
longest- remembered character. All 
of Kirbys heroes are immensely 
bigger than life-size. As he said 
duiing our talk (I don't flatter 
myself by calling it an interview) 
when asked how he saw the 
comics. 

"It's an American myth-making 
machine. It's the way we create our 
new Paul Bunyans. Maybe that's all 
that comics do. And there's 
nothing wrong with that. . . The 
comics, I feel, is a forthright, strictly 
American expression, so far." 



When the comics sorted out, 
they started in a time w">en good 
and evil were clear, and that is one 
of their strengths and its 
weaknesses. Things were simpler 
as Jack (every fan feels justified in 
calling him Jack, so I might as well. 
Never mind the fact that while 
speaking to him I never called him 
anything but Mr. Kirby.) said, 
". . There's no subtleties involved, 
no shadings of grey. . . There's 
nothing more effective than one 
belligerent side against the other. 
And that was the tone of comics 
and every other medium at the 
time." 

I wish I had room to give more of 
the interview (Okay, so I decided to 
flatter myself a little) however the 
editor only allowed me fifteen 
inches. For your H.R., however, this 
was a high point of the weekend. 
That last sentence, of course, lacks 
proper journalistic detachment, but 
what can you expect from a car- 
toonist with delusions of grandeur? 
Eric Sevareid I ain't, folks. 

The convention ended, for Kris 
and myself, on a cheery note 
Sunday. We left the Hotel with our 
luggage; and walked into a rain- 
storm. So, with tears in our eyes, 
and rain running down our necks, 
we bid a fond (Hah!) farewell to the 
Hotel Commodore and Phil 
Seuling's 1975 Comic Art Hustle. . . 
uh. . . Convention. 




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By Kris Jackson 

She's the kind of woman you 
only see in New York: her hair, 
precisely the right colors, is coiffed 
in an insouciant curl like a Barbie 
doll; her face could have been made 
up by Picasso, she is wearing a 
little, black dress that is sliced and 
slashed in lots of intriguing places 
and laced loosly back together. She 
is painfully crossing the pseudo- 
Victorian lobby of the Commodore 
Hotel on high shoes that are both 
platforms and heels. 

One of the guys slouched beside 
me on the couch calls out, "Hey, 
doncha think you should wear flats 
if them things hurt you so much?" 
She wheels around. "Fuck you!" 
she shouts. "Everybody says that! 
Cant'cha realize that I have a bad 
back and gotta walk this way 
anyway?!" 

She hobbles on her indignant 
way and after a silence, the guy 
who spoke mutters, "Well, if she 
does have a bad back, those heels 
can'T be helping her." 

"Oh, YEAH, man," says his 
friend, "she should get some Earth 
Shoes." 

"Oh, yeah, really, man, I can't 
wear anything but now!" 
"Yuh, me neiter." 
Silence. 

"But they wouldn't really be 
appropriate here." 

"Yeah . . . this is more of a glitter 
thing." 
"Here" rs Phil Seuling's Comtcs 



Convention, or whatever it's called, 
which Mike and I had just arrived 
at, armed with press credentials. 
The lobby is a wierd amalgam pf 
behind-the-scenes-ers, hangers-on, 
comics groupies, slightly over- 
weight adolescent boys (the 
stereotype of the comics fan), and 
even cartoonists. They are a mixed 
bag in about as many ways as a bag 
can be mixed, united by only one 



been getting at least seventy-five 
for all of this," he says in his best 
straight face. 

"Well . . . let's see what ya got 
here." 

Anything to do with comics that 
could be bought or sold can be 
found in the ballroom. In the back, 
for all the world like an Oriental rug 
seller, a character is hawking 
posters to the rubes. His come-on is 



She wheels around. 'TUCK YOU!" 
she shouts. "Everybody says that! 
Cant'cha see that I have a bad back." 



common thread: ink on paper. 

A fortyish gent sits at a table in 
the ballroom amidst a turbulent 
Turkish Bazaar type scene with 
stacks of Avengers originals before 
him. I had seen original black-and- 
white pages of Marvel-type stuff 
before, but never a stack like this. 
Confronting him is a kid of about 
fourteen with his own stack of 
originals under his arm "You in- 
terested in Adams?" 
"If it's the Avengers." 
"What are yours going for?" 
"Depends. A lot of your stuff 
looks kind of beat up." 

The kid's stack has been flipped 
through, admired, pondered and 
lusted after so many times that the 
ink is rubbing onto the backs of the 
pages, and -his edges are -fraying. "I 



a huge, imposing vision of a 
hunkering, dripping, tattered 
monster with glowing eyes rising 
from a moonlit swamp, only two 
dollars. 

My own orientation as a car- 
toonist tends toward Sex and 
Violence rather than Heroes and 
Monsters, so I didn't quite relate to 
the scene. Half my reason for being 
at the convention in the first place 
was the predicted presence of 
Vaughn Bode, the pop-mystic- 
transvestite Messiah of the un- 
derground. Eventually Mike and I 
ended up in his presence. What 
followed then? You will never 
know. Space limitations, all that. 
Suffish it to say that I'll be back 
next year, that is if I can get myself 
in for free again. 4 • 



By Aaron Hubor 

In Amherst and surrounding 
communities finding a place to live 
it a dilemma for many people. 
Housing problems continually 
plague the area. If you are a 
commuter to UMass you are 1 or 
more than 7,000 people living 
within a 60 mile radius paying 
commuter fees, but having no 
voice in how the money will be 
spent. The group of commuters is 
so diverse that about the only thing 
held in common is housing 
problems. 

The housing market in the area is 



the sellers market with the buyer 
having little or no say how his living 
environment will be controlled. 
Demand far exceeds supply for 
housing and as a relust, tenants are 
subjected to highrent, illegal 
evictions, discrimination of all 
shapes and colors, ambiguious and 
illegal clauses in leases, poor 
management and up-keep of 
existing housing, unreturned 
security deposits and the hassles of 
going to small claims court to get 
abuses resolved. 

Landlords aware of the low 
vacancy of housing throughout the 



area have the advantage over 
tenants. Often landlords are forced 
upon tenants. If you don't like them 
you can easily be replaced. Tenants 



News Commentary 



are often intimidated and forget 
they are protected by laws and that 
they do have rights. 

The foremost tenant problem in 
the area is little or no sense of 
community or a collective voice. 



Teacher, course evaluations 

a guide for evaluations based on characteristics 



By Rob Melacasa 

A project is underway at the 
Center for Instructional Resources 
and Improvement (C.I. R.I.) to 
design and implement a course and 
teacher evaluation guide. 

According to Sheryl Riechmann, 
director of C.I. R.I. , the project is 
aimed at "developing a format for 
evaluations based on course and 
teacher characteristics," and is 
planned in four parts. 

The first part is now being carried 
out in the form of a survey in which 
students will be asked to complete 
a questionnaire listing five 
characteristics of the best courses 
and the best teachers that the 
students have had at UMASS. The 
questionnaire results will then be 
evaluated in an attempt to design a 
sample evaluation form, which will 
be tested on a cross section of this 
summer's classes. 

The feedback from the pilot will 
be used to test the usefulness and 
validity of the sample form, and 



necessary modifications will then 
be made. Step three will be ac- 
complished this fall by locating 
between three and six departments 
willing to try the pilot evaluation 
form, either in conjunction with 
their own, or by itself. 

Students will again be polled at 
the end of the semester, to 
ascertain what was gained from the 
new evaluation from the student's 
point of view. 

After intersession, several 
concerned groups will meet to 
discuss the feasibility of the new 
form, and decide on adequate ways 
to disseminate its results. Some of 
the involved representatives include 
the Provost's Office, Academic 
Affairs, the C.I. R.I. Advisory Board 
(which includes faculty and 
students), and several student 
senators. 

The existing evaluations are used 
in personnel decisions, or for the 
information of instructors. There is 
very little information of immediate 



use to students. The new system 
should change that, giving students 
a useful resource to assist in course 
selection, while still fulfilling the 
necessary personnel and in- 
structional requirements. 

"We want people to know the 
things that are important to them, •, 
the kind of things that they would 
ask their friends about courses and 
teachers," said Ms. Riechmann. 

Some questions to be decided in 
the coming spring include how to 
make the information available to 
all concerned. Some options 
mentioned are whether or not 
evaluations of courses could be 
included in the course description 
guide, or should be a separate 
publication. Another option is the 
inclusion of the evaluative in- 
formation project in the CASPER 
project, now being tested on 
Campus. 



However, in view events over the 
past year, it appears this trend is 
coming to an end. The complexion 
of the landlord-tenant relationship 
is slowly changing, and tenants are 
beginning to gain some victories. 

In a move to organize tenants the 
Commuter Assembly in con- 
junction with the Veterans Coalition 
for community Affairs has 
established the Pioneer Valley 
Tenants Association located in the 
Student Union. The association is 
acting as a guidance group to 
provide assistance to area tenants. 
Hopefully the association can give 
initiative to tenants to organize into 
tenant union having collective 
bargaining power. 

Tenants of married student 
housing are about to realize a co-op 
with collective bargaining powers. 
Last fall tenants of married student 
housing faced with rent increases 
from 15-39 per cent joined together 
and began a rent strike to gain a 
rent rollback to a fair cost of living 
increase. Through their efforts the 
UMass. Tenants Association 
(UMTA) was formed. The rent 
strikers decided than rather con- 
tinuing the fight for a rent rollback 
they would direct their efforts to 



become an independent 
management co-op, responsible for 
their own services, staff and 
maintance by September, 1975. All 
that is needed now is Trustee 
approval of the contract in August. 
If approve it will be the first such 
co-op in the area, and with a step 
toward development other tenant 
co-ops. 

If you are looking for housing or 
know someone new to the area 
who will need housing, that hassle 
is being made easier and free by the 
Off-Campus Housing Office now in 
Munson Hall. They have 
established a computer based 
housing referral system seeking to 
bring people and housing together. 

In view of these and other events 
over the past year, it appears the 
tenant is beginning to have more 
say in housing. At last tenants are 
joining together and being joined to 
stand for their rights against 
landlords. 

This is the first in a series about 
the housing problems which 
students face, and the solutions 
which are being offered. Next 
week: The University of 
Massachusetts Tenant Association. 



S.U. Art Gallery 



Exhibiting their work in a group 
show at the Student Union Gallery 
from July 20 to 26 will be three 
Boston Area Printmakers. Showing 
will be Tina Stack who has studied 
in Europe and is a printer for the 
Graphic Society in New Hampshire, 
Bill Duty, who will be printing at a 
lithography workshop this summer, 
and Linda Martyniak, a free lance 
silkscreen printmaker, who will be 
teaching photo printmaking in the 
fall. The show will open on 
Saturday, July 19th, at 7:00 p.m. 
and the public is invited to attend. 




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next to 
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12 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



yypnMFSDAY. JULY 16. 1975 



Review 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



13 



Concert 




Ken Shapiro 



Dave Brubeck 



In Concert 

Two Generations of Brubeck 

Music Inn, Lenox 

Saturday, July 12 

By Alan Anastos 

At first, it had all the earmarks of a late 
sixties rock festival. Long-haired, bloodshot- 
eyed, blue-jeaned kids everywhere. Frisbees. 
Blankets. Beer. Pot. Even a couple of 
wasted, teenage girls at the gate asking for 
spare change. But a closer examination of 
the scene at The Music Inn in Lenox revealed 
something not at all reminiscent of a rock 
festival. Neckties. 

The crowd of appro v imately one-thousand 
in attendance for the concert entitled "Two 
Generations of Brubeck" was comprised of 
at least two generations of music lovers. 

It can be safely assumed that the majority 
of those over thirty were at the concert to 
see and hear Dave Brubeck, the prolific jazz 
pianist who embarked some twenty-five 
years ago and who is recognized as an 
important figure in the shaping of the 
audience was there to see "Sky King", Chris 
Brubeck's band, which plays a blend of blues 



and "ass-kickin'rock and roll", as Chris 
described it. 

The Darius Brubeck Ensemble took the 
stage following "Sky King", and father and 
son faced each other over their respective 
keyboards. Dave at the acoustical grand 
piano and Darius at the electric keyboard. 
Danny Brubeck was on drums. 

What could be more appropriate than 
Brubeck and son playing two different jazz 
tunes ' simultaneously, each from the 
respective generations? Well, the Brubecks 
did it, and quite successfully too. Strangely 
enough, both tunes were of the same title — 
almost. Dave played Art Tatum's classic 
"Yesterdays" while Darius played his ren- 
dition of Lennon-McCartney's song 
"Yesterday". Rick Kilburn on upright bass 
and younger brother Danny on drums 
backed them up tastefully in the rythmn 
section. 

Dave Brubeck, a pioneer of polytonals in 
modern jazz, has always been recognized as 
one who is willing to experiment with new 
sounds, just so long as they don't clash. He 
lived up to this while playing his two most 



popular songs - "Take c ive " and "Blue 
Rondo A La Turk". Who would have thought 
that an electric keyboard ana a harmonica 
would have a place in either o* theso songs? 
Certainly not some of the people 'it The 
Music Inn Saturday evening. But, two 
choruses into "Take Five" it was apparent to 
the audience that it would indeed work, and 
most present responded warmly to the "new 
sound". 

But even as this writer tapped his foot 
along with the music, he wondered about 
something. As Dave Brubeck sat there 
without Paul Desmond on sax and Joe 
Morello on drums, and listened to his sons 
play their music, was he really happy with 
what he heard. I searched his face, the faces 
of some of the older ones in the audience for 
a clue. Then I just sat back and listened and 
decided that "Two Generations of Brubeck" 
offer a little bit of everything in the way of 
music and that each of those playing make 
their respective contributions to that sound. 
Doesn't seem to be any room for a 
generation gap there. 



Gallery 



Stories 

A group show by area artists 

Student Union Gallery 

July 7-11 
Reviewed by Peter Belsito 

What was of particular interest concerning 
the group show entitled "Stories," (Student 
Union Gallery, July 7-1 1 ), was the attempt to 
knit together art and personal experience in a 
gallery context, while adhering to no strict 
formula. The resulting event which was 
recorded on the evening of the seventh, and 
replayed for visitors to the gallery during the 



week, was in an art sense, not quite fulfilling, 
while functioning successfully as en- 
tertainment. This brings*me to the question 
of. When is entertainment art?, or more 
specifically, When is the telling of a story art? 
These questions tread upon thin ice, in 
that every individual in entitled to their own 
opinion as to whether or not the meeting, 
and recording of a group of people telling 
tales, (and for the most part attempting to be 
amusing by being humorous), can in fact 
function as art. My personal feeling is that it 
cannot, for the simple reason that the 
prese nce of a running tape recorder does not 



necessarily constitute grounds for the 
production of art, and the presence of such 
recording devices was the only contrivance 
which separated the meeting of some thirty 
persons in the gallery July 7th from a bull 
session you can find on nearly every corridor 
of every dorm, on any given night of the 
school year. Therefore it is my opinion that 
this show served as entertainment, which I 
would define as an activity designed to be 
diverting and or amusing. To be sure this is 
where "Stories" excelled. 

There is one more issue I would like to 
raise, which asks the question of whether or 



not the intent to create art automatically 
causes the end product to be art? 

No matter how far the limits of what is, 
and is not art are pushed, it would seem that 
the reasoning to create art, can only be the 
perfection of that particular discipline, no 
matter what form it may assume. In the 
cases where the end product has fallen short 
of the requirements for the perfection of that 
form, the work can only be seen as an at- 
tempt. The criterion for resolving this 
question can only be found in the minds of 
the individuals who create or observe the 
forms. 



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Artist 



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$2.95 ni 8 ht, y 500-11:00 
At The Elmwood Rte. 9 Hadley 





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Jean Cam, noted contemporary recording artist, 
was a visitor to the Uniyersity community last week to 
rehearse for an upcoming recordinq that will be 
produced by two University of Massachusetts 
graduates, Kwaku Sander and Stanley Kinard, who 
have formed a production company called Ananse's 
Web. Ms. Cam, who is most noted for her singing 
with Doug Cam and Norman Connors, was born in 
Atlanta, Georgia- where she now resides. She started 
singing and playing o*gan in the church at three and 
majored in music at the Morris Brown University, 
where she met Doug Cam and they formed their 
singing group. She stated that her early training was 
also in classical music but she found it boring and 
monotonous because of its repetitive qualities. She 
was moved to examine the music of some of her 
contemporaries such as Eddie Jefferson and King 
Pleasant who took the melodic lines of music and 
transposed them into words. She stated that her all- 
time favorite singer is Miss Ella Fitzgerald who will be 
performing a concert here next year. She also stated 
coming to Amherst to work with such artists as 
Archie Shepp, Hubert Eves, and Charles Greenlee was 
a rewarding experience, and something that she had 
hoped to do for sometime. One of her main 
philosophies of life, she related, was to expand her 
musical ability to its highest possible qualities. An 
upcoming trip to Brazil is planned with the Norman 
Connors Band and she hopes to eventually go in- 
dependent and do her own composing and arranging, 
and possibly sign with a recording company that will 
allow her to have the most creative expression. 

Ananse's Web, which is based in Amherst, is 
producing the album and is also in the business of 
importing African goods and improving the cultural 
communication apparatus that encompuses the 
African aesthetic. 




Jean Cam 



Ms. Cam, who is a strong advocate of African 
culture, wanted to aide this production company in 
this particular venture. Ms. Cam will also be per- 
forming some of her works in April of 1976, when the 
Black Musicians Conference will present her in a 
program of Black Women in Song. 



3 BEDROOMS 
SECOND FLOOR 
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Caustic Comments 



By Mike 'lingerie poem' Kostek 

Today 

ELVIS PRESLEY 

(RCAAPL1-1039) 

time 33:19 

Elvis today is 40 years old, so it's 
no surprise if he makes easy 
middle-aged records designed for 
sitting to, not stomping to. The 
cool, removed appreciation of rock 
ft roll that Las Vegas and middle 
American demand has been batting 
practice for Elvis for the past years. 
And it's 'Swat!' 'Swat!' 'Swat!' as 
El hits them out easily. Happily, for 
us perky young 'uns, old Pres 
hasn't forgot to handle the heaters, 
and Today is his best, most alive 
record since his live in Memphis 
'comeback'. B. , 



Midnight On The Water 

DAVID BROMBERG ft BAND 

(Columbia PC 33397) 

time 38:18 

Easy to take record that will do 
wonders for those who like their 
occasional country- blues served up 
nicely. Tasteful, tuneful, with a 
wide assortment of those 'hands 
across the Rio Grande to Scotland' 
type mow-downs. Bromberg can 
never forget, though, that he's an 
American living in 1975 in the 
hippest country in the history of the 
world, and the fact that he knows 
more about singing and pickin' than 
any of the people who wrote the 
songs makes for an uncomfortable 
scene, as he's not quite figured 
where to go from there. B. 



Best Of Free 
FREE 

(AftM SP 3663) 
time 46:06 

Nice hot item here, as this 
band, with the beautiful moves of a 
snake and its own original motion 
(how rare in the rock world!) had 
that most elusive of qualities-real 
style. They went a lot deeper in 
their music than most bands 
ventured, and placed an amazing 
amount of feeling in the spaces 
between the notes. This is a good 
collection that outshines any of the 
things the survivors have fallen into 
since (Bad Company, Kossoff). 
Remember when bands were an 
event? Free were one of the slowest 
of events, and one of the most 
satisfying. Aminus. 



Bits and Pieces 



In the swim 

At 6:45 p.m. on Thursday, July 
17, 1975 there will be a cross 
country race for men and women 
on the fields which surround Derby 
Track. Entries for this event can be 
submitted up to race time. Please 
note the date and time change from 
the original announcement. The 
correct time, date and place are 
listed above. 

The Summer Intramural swim 
meet will be held Tuesday, July 22, 
1975 at 6:00 p.m. in the Boyden 
Pool. You don't have to be Donna 
DeVarona or Mark Spitz to com- 
pete and have a good time. Entries 
for all events, including individual 
swimming, diving, and relays for 
men and women will be accepted 
up to the start of the meet. For 
information call the IM office at 5- 
2801 or 5-2693. 

All individual participants in 
tennis, badminton, squash, etc. are 
reminded to play their matches 
before the time limit so the tour- 
nament will progress on schedule. 
Also, participants may play ahead 
of schedule if mutually agreeable. 




Hall. Everyone is welcome to attend 
and participate. 

The group is assembling a 
schedule of member programs for 
Channel 8 and planning a series of 
training workshops for members of 
other community service 
organizations in the Fall. The 
Center is the working group for 
citizen use of the public access 
features of cable TV. 

"We hope to provide a matching 
service for the Town," the Centers' 
spokesperson reports. "Some of 
our members are experienced in 
video production, but need 
programming ideas; others are from 
civic groups who feel an acute need 




Women vs. FBI 

University and community 
women are urgently invited to 
attend a panel discussion on 
WOMEN AGAINST FBI AND 
GRAND JURY ABUSE on Wed- 
nesday, July 16, at 7:30 p.m. in 
Room 231., Herter, UMass, 
Amherst. The panelists will be 
Nancy Brockway of the Grand Jury 
Information Project and Janet 
R if kin of the Women's Law Center. 
The discussion is being sponsored 
by Even/woman's Center because 
of its concern over government 
abuse of citizens' constitutional 
rights^ 

Every woman's 
soliciting 

Even/woman's Center at the 
University of Ma. at Amherst is 
currently soliciting workshop 
proposals for Project Self 
workshops for Fall 1975. Project 
Self consists of both 8-week 
workshops and day-long 
workshops by, for and about 
women, which are scheduled 
throughout the year. The Fall 1975 
series will begin on Oct. 6th and run 
through November 26th. The areas 
m which proposals are sought a.e 
personal identity, political identity, 
cross-cultural perspectives on 
women, skills for living and the arts. 

The deadline for submitting 
Proposals is July 18, 1975. In- 
terested women can call 
Everywoman's Center at 545-0883 
( 413) or drop by the Center, 506 
Goodell and pick up a proposal 
f orm and talk with us about your 
'dea for a workshop. 

CCATV 

The Center for Community 
Access Television at Amherst will 
e| ect officers and plan Fall 
Programs at an open meeting 
Wednesday night, July 16th, 7:30 
P •m. in the Town Room at Town 



to communicate their ideas or their 
group's services, but have no 
production experience. In some 
instances the former group will 
produce programs for the latter, but 
ideally, each will train the other." 

"No prior knowledge of cable TV 
or video production is required for 
membership," spokespersons 
stress. "What we need most right 
now are businessmen and ad- 
ministrators, and willing hands of all 
ages and skills or experience who 
are willing to learn and participate 
in an important community un- 
dertaking." 

The first issue of the CCATV's 
newsletter, Telcenter, has just been 
mailed out and is available by 
writing the Center at Box 138, 
Amherst, Ma. 01002 or phoning 
584-7984. 




banned the importation of whale oil 
in 1971 because of the threat to the 
sperm whale. Stockpiles of whale 
oil have almost run out, and still no 
substitute is available. 

But now, a study by the National 
Research Council says that 
cultivated jojoba plantations in the 
southwestern desert can solve that 
problem. Also, they point out, the 
plant will grow in otherwise un- 
tillable desert and could provide an 
economic bonanza for a number of 
desert Indian reservations. One 
scientist from the Department of 
Agriculture referred to the plant as 
"liquid gold." 

The Council recommended an 
immediate program to start 2,000 
acres of jojoba plantations over the 
next four years. 

Women 
and the 

Budget 

The University Women's Caucus 
has been collecting data on the 
current status of women's 
programming and has been trying 
to outline the particular con- 
sequences of proposed cuts on 
women in the university. The 
Caucus will hold an open meeting 
on Thursday, July 17 in the campus 
center, room 165 at 12 noon to 
share information and to discuss 
the most appropriate strategies at 
this time for effecting internal 
allocations. Since the Legislature 
has not yet made a final decision 
regarding the total budget, the 
Caucus will also discuss the 
feasibility and viability of lobbying 
in Boston and presenting testimony 
at Ways and Means Committee 
hearings in August. 



Jojoba may 
save sperms 

(EARTH NEWS) Government 
research scientists say that a lowly 
shrub that grows wild in northern 
Mexico may turn into one of the 
most valuable cash crops in the 
Southwest - and save the en- 
dangered sperm whale as well. 

They're talking about a plant 
'called the jojoba which they've 
discovered produces an oily 
substance almost identical to sperm 
whale oil. Whale oil is considered a 
valuable extreme pressure lubricant 
for which there was believed to be 
no substitute. The government 



Summer 
Outdoor 

Program 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 16 

7:00 p.m. Outing Club softball 
game at Boyden fields. All are 
welcome. 
THURSDAY, JULY 17 

4:00 to 6:00 p.m. Outdoor 
Program summer seminar series: 
hiking and camping equipment 
discussion. Room 168-170 Campus 
Center. 

5:00 p.m. Outing Club trip. 
Canoeing on the Connecticut River. 
Meet at the Outing Club Canoe 
Barn. 
FRIDAY, JULY 18 

3:00 to 6:00 p.m. Afternoon 
bicycle trip. Destination to be 
determined by participants. Meet in 
front of the Student Union. 



FRIDAY, JULY 1b TO SUNDAY, 
JULY 20 

Outing Club weekend trip. Hiking 
on the Appalachian Trail in North- 
west Connecticut. No experience 
necessary. See Outing Club bulletin 
board. 
TUESDAY, JULY 22 

5:30 p.m. Outing Club* trip. 
Caving at the Sunderland Ice Cave. 
Meet in front of the Student Union. 
7:30 p.m. Hikecanteer 

organization meeting. People in- 
terested in helping out with a 
hiking, biking, canoeing, and 
orienteering race, come to room 
168-170 of the Campus Center. 

fiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiu 
CAMPUS PHOTO 
I n between the Pub and 

Lafayette 



TRI-X 
PLUS-X 
LFORD HP4 
Exposure Rolls 



99 





The 

Great 

STEAK 

Rebate 

Every Saturday and Sunday, Bonanza is giving a 50 cent rebate on 
both the Sirloin Strip dinner, and the T-Bone Steak dinner. 



T-Bone 
Steak 
Dinner 




(includes 50 
rebate) 



This dinner includes T Bone 
Steak, salad, potato, and reg. 3 89 

id 



Sirloin Strip 
Dinner 




r he Sirloin dinner includes a 
Sirloin Strip steak, salad, 
poMto <wd brertd 



(includes 50 
rebate) 

reg 2 89 




Mountain Farms Mall 
Rte. 9 Hadley 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1975 - 



II Y 1ft. Iff . 



TMc MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



IS 



THE WIZARD OF ID 



by Brant parktr and Johnny hart 




B C. 




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Kris Jackson 

^$* Cthe depar ima* justices 





Your Stars This Week 

By Stella Wilder 



All efforts to move ahead 
quickly this week will surely be 
frustrated, for now is a time of 
quiet progress, of attaining long 
held goals with little fanfare, 
perhaps even without a great 
deal of personal satisfaction. On 
the other hand, any who take ad- 
vantage of time unexpectedly 
available this week to slean up 
leftover work, complete projects 
left hanging Tire, and the like, 
should find himself well pleased 
with the clean slate that results 
from his labors. Obviously, this is 
a week when plans can be made 
for new undertakings, though 
the undertakings themselves are 
better postponed for another 
week or so. New directions, new 
interests, new desires should 
abound by week's end 

Early in the week, the in- 
dividual with a knowledge of 
psychology may gain tremen- 
dous insight into his own 
behavior, any without such 
knowledge may feel himself sub 
ject to influences foreign to all 
his previous experience ~ in- 
fluences which, if accepted and 
acted upon, may well lead to 
bright new successes in fields of 
endeavor little considered 
heretofore Gratitude plays a 
large part in personal relation- 
ships this week those who 
possess it move toward firmer 
friendships at week's end. 

CANCER (June 21 July 7) - 
You would do well to take per- 
sonal motives into consideration 
when attempting to reschedule 
activities Things may not be as 
you think. Uuly 8-July 22)- 
Honesty has not ceased to be the 
best policy' Remember your 
promises to those who helped 
you in the past Turn your alien 
tion to the young 

LEO Uuly 23-Aug 7) - This 
may well be an exceptionally 
restful, peaceful week for you 
Don't hesitate to take advantage 



of another s willingness to use his 
influence (Aug. 8-Aug 22>- 
Take the time necessary to plan 
ahead in more than haphazard 
fashion This is an excellent time 
to lake stock of your talents. Be 
honest' . 

VIRGO (Aug 23-Sept 7) - 
There are special benefits to be 
gained by those who are willing 
to take less than their share of 
(he obvious ones. Deliver a 
message (Sept 8-Sept 22)- 
Family matters, though they 
may have gone long ignored, 
must be brought into the 
foreground now Listen carefully 
to what youngsters say 

UBKA (Sept 2>0ct. 7) - 
Take another's advice to heart 
Don't worry should it be your 
misfortune to be overlooked 
when benefits are passed out 
early in the week (Oct 8-Oct 
22>-Spend a good part of the 
week in mental activities as op- 
posed to physical ones Too 
much of the latter could place 
your health in jeopardy 

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov 7) - 
Take care of essential matters 
early in the week. You can be 
sure of outdistancing the com 
petition if you begin early 
enough lo move ahead (Nov 8- 
Nov 21)-Avoid overloading the 
daily schedule, especially during 
(he latter half of the week when 
you are going (o need spare I ime 
and additional energy 

SAGITTARIUS 'Nov 22 
Dec 71 — A little self-analysis 
may go a long way toward mak 
ing you and your loved ones hap- 
pier people Some professional 
advice may be in order (Dec 8 
Dec 2D— Though your pleasures 
are harmless enough, you may 
be tempted to spend loo much 
time at them this week Seek to 
balance work and plav 

CAPRICORN (Dec 22- Jan 6) 
- Free yourself from the kind of 
worry that keeps you from ac- 



complishii..' your uuaLs Move 
ahead towaH solutions by think- 
ing back in time (Jan. 7- Jan. 
19>— Let youi own interests 
come first this week Toward 
week's end you may give in to 
your natural generosity of spirit. 
Keep to work you know well 

AQl ARIl S (Jan 20- Feb 3) 
- An evaluation ' of past and 
present, accurately made, is es- 
sential to your grasp of what you 
must do to preserve and secure 
your future (Feb 4 Feb 18)- 
Concentrate on personal goals 
this week Don't allow yourself lo 
fall victim to another's ability lo 
talk people into activities foreign 
to them. 

PISCES (Feb 19- March 5> - 
Prepare now for the immediate 
future - without worrying about 
what you may have lo give up in 
the present Memory must serve 
you well this week (March 6- 
March 20)— Make a good show- 
ing early in the week and you 
v. ill surely be first in line for ad- 
vancement toward week's end. 
Don'l ride on your reputation 

ARIES (March 21 April 4) - 
Keep a wary eye out for the con- 
sequences of shoddy workman- 
ship Toots thai are ill-made 
could cause you lo fall behind 
with present projects. (April b- 
April 191— Make an effort to 
keep home improvements at a 
minimum, despite another's in- 
sistence thai a great deal be 
done Wail for a belter time 

TAURUS (April 20-May 5> - 
Financial affairs take a turn for 
the better early in the week 
Take care that extravagance 
does not eat up savings as week 
draws to a close (May 6- May 
20i- It may be that your silence 
on the subject of advancement is 
actually holding you back on the 
employment scene Speak up 
about getting ahead' 



i ', m 



* Student power 



continued from page 2 

O'Keefe said that changes will 
include bringing in more 
professional expertise, i.e., people 
with backround in systems analysis, 
and economics, so that the SGA 
will be able to initiate viable 
programs, a decentralization of 
power, town meetings at least once 
|a month, closer cooperation and 
communication with the Graduate 
Senate and Area Governments, and 
increased representation by SGA 
representitives of their con- 
stituents. 

— Campus Center Audit — An 
independent student audit of the 
Campus Center will start withing 
three weeks. O'Keefe stated that 
the present audit team did not want 
student representation and he 
accused the audit team of being too 
"in-house" with the people biing 
investigated. 

Other programs include research 
on the University budget, research 
on gover nance, investigations of 



i 



dorm cooperatives on campus and 
housing cooperatives off campus, a 
complete investigation of the Food 
Services and its alternatives, study 
of a job bank, elimination or 
takeover of towing, a resource 
conservation program covering 
automobiles, use of electricity, etc., 
making a cooperative out of the 
textbook annex, expansion of day 
care, and a program to get UMass 
back on the major concert tour 
rout, and, thus, lower SATF tax 
with money raised from concerts. 
O'Keefe summed up the goal of 
his office in this way: "Students 
getting their rights.. .We don't want 
to step on any one else, we don't 
want to get into anyone else's 
field.. .but we, as students and 
consumers of education feel that 
we have rights and entitlements to 
how this university is run, what we 
learn, where we live, what we eat, 
and where our money goes.. .full 
and equal participation, no more 
tokenism." 



* Sports equality 



continuea rrom page 7 

a form stating that there are no 
discriminatory acts (as put forth by 
the guidelines) or that any 
descriminatory acts are being 
remedied. However, the Federal 
government is given permission to 
come in and see for itself that all is 
fair. Each educational institution 
must sign this 'Assurance of 
Compliance' if it is to receive 
Federal dollars." 

Women's athletics at UMass will 
show immediate changes this year, 
in line with Title IX's guidelines. The 
women's basketball team will often 
be playing at the Cage (six times), 



twice directly before the men's 
varsity team, forming double- 
headers. Another doubleheader 
including the women will be at the 
Springfield Civic Center vs. 
Southern Connecticut as the men 
play Villanova afterwards. 

"We're trying to schedule better 
competition and more games and 
extend the seasons a bit," Barfield 
said. "We're also adding two more 
varsity sports - golf and track for 
interested women." 

Frank Mclnnerny, Director of 
Athletics at UMass, was not 
available for comment on the issue 
of Title IX. 



* Student union? 



. 



continued from page 3 

$200 for operational expenses. 

-to adopt the University Student 
Federal Credit Union Association 
Constitution. 

-to allocate $20 for the purpose 
of a mailing to the members of the 
Senate and Area Governments. 

-to authorize certain category 
changes, totally $1,343.85, in the 
FY 75 budget index No. 103 to 
cover bills that have recently come 
in. 



It ».*.« ».#>*» I 



-to authorize certain category 
changes, ammounting to $1,000 in 
the Credit Union No. 846 in the FY 
76 budget. The ratinale for the 
changes concern the purchasing of 
a file, safe, and calculator. The 
money, instead, is to be used to pay 
for their consulting manager. 

The Exec. comm. tabled a motion 
to set the SATF for Fiscal Year 1977 
at a figure of no more than $55 per 
student and no less than $50 per 

student. 

. <. . ....... 



C!j0U\^B(U 



AUTO fOR_$ALE 

1*7 VIP PLYMOUTH hrdtp powr 
strg and brake*, automatic tran- 
smission, reclining pamngtr teat. 
white body, black vinyl top. Call 
584-1316. Asking 300. 

" WANTED" 

FEMINIST HOUSEHOLD aaaka 
woman or man for aummar ard-or 
(all. Nica S. Amharat houaa. 1100 
jncl.tintll.263-3907^ 

BOB STILL WANTS your ailing or 
decrepit carl Faat M for the hulk, 
2537967. 



FOR SALE 



CASSETTE TAPES. Big Selection 
5496702. 

7-16 



BOB WILL STILL FIX YOUR CAR 
RIGHT. Any make, yr.. model. No 
iob to small, 263-7967. 

ROOM FOR _RENT~ 

ROOM IN DUPLEX NEAR Puf- 
fer' a Pond refreshing Band bottom 
stream in backyard M0 mo. W 
Sept. option. Call Jan 640-0312 
Waaher 6 Dryer in Beaement. 
_7-16 

GAY DjSCO 

THIS FRI. July 18. 9 o.m.-1 a.m. at 
Farley Lodge (on cempua). 
Pafreahmenta served 76 cents. 

RIDE_ WANTED 

TORONTO, BUFFALO OR ~V\C 
any wknd or share cer rent. Al 
Blizzard 546-2788 or 646-3480 Leave 
Msg. See Toronto for 130. 



PUTNEY SW0PE 

W-TV 7:00 and 10:00 

WR-MYSTERIESOF 

THE ORGANISM 

W-TV at 8: 30 

THE HARDER THEY COME 
Fri. and Sat. 11:30 

5860935 



AMHERSTO** 




* CC student audit 



continued from page 3 

"You can't get to the bottom 
with this in-house stuff — this in- 
house stuff doesn't cut it," said 
O'Keefe. 

O'Keefe said allegations of 
prostitution, dope dealing, and 
shady purchasing practices can't be 
investigated by the kind of team 
appointed by Bromery. He said he 
was considering contacting the 
Internal Revenue Service, the U.S. 
Treasury or the State Attorney 
General if other alternatives do not 
satisfy what his staff and other 
students feel is necessary in the 
way of an investigation. 

O'Keefe said neither the special 
team or one made up of un- 
dergraduate students would have 
the subpoena power needed to 
perform a full investigation into the 
operations of the Campus Center. 
O'Keefe said it is his opinion that 
the administration does not like the 
student Board of Governors who 
are responsible for much of the 
decision making in the Campus 
Center. The BOG have called for at 
least one investigation into the 
Campus Center operations two 



years ago when a private consulting 
firm analyzed why the Campus 
Center was continually losing 
money. 

According to Dean the BOG have 
been cooperating in the team's 
efforts to review present Campus 
Center operations, some of which 
the BOG is responsible for. 

O'Keefe said the administration 
does not like to see some of the 
questions aired that the BOG has 
raised lately including: 

— recommendations that Philip 
Amico, director of Food Services 
be dismissed for misfeasance; 

— concerns raised about the 
Stephano wedding including late 
billing and inaccurate billing; 

— and the question of a Campus 
Center student employee being 
dismissed without cause or 
justification. 

O'Keefe said if a special un- 
dergraduate team is selected as the 
option to pursue the positions 
would be advertised and the Hiring 
committee set up by the Senate 
Executive committee would 
conduct interviews and make the 
final hiring decisions. 




MON 4 TUES ALL SEATS Jl 00 



WW ■ 



* *AT' 
•OF SMITH COLLEGE 

•ODEMi 
jttMJSC • 



NORTHAMPTON 






— NOW— 7:00&9:10 

Expect all that the 
motion picture screen has* 
never dared to show before 1 

Expect the truth. 




MOUNTAIN FARMS FOUR 



Maybe he would find the girl ... 
maybe he would find himself. 

Gene Hackman starring in 

NIGHT 
MOVES 

an Arthur Penn film 
a Robert Sherman production 
call 584-9153 for time schedule. 



royi ftic-J MOUNTAIN FARMS MALL 
0043IDJ RQuTt 9-HADcEY MASS 



Limited 
Engagement ' 



The Catholic News 

"...a deeply spiritual film." 

Saturday Evening Post 

The greatest suspense 
him ever made.'' 

*lilW KB lAlTY^ 

THE EXORCIST 

.^ —.HUAM AUK* 

R Maa. Skrvltan l « SIS. TWMHsr IIMft FM. 

1 «:«*. !.•:»; TwMSfcrl IM 4S. MI. !:«. T. •:»;*■♦- 

SW HsMfss. *ss. t »:«. » l». T»tKsr I IM «• 



Hurry 



Final Witk. 



w 



III 



CUNT 

THE EKER SANCTION 

Mnn Ihru Thor. S «S. S IS. TWMHS* J IM IS Frl 

I is 7 SiM Twiltlfr 4 IS-4 IS Sat 2. * 4S. 7.SJS; T*l- 
l.lrr I IS! li SWI I. * « » ■* TwI-llWr SIS-S « 



The rriir shry <* Ml Kinrrxml 
Th»' AmrrK an CHympn 
ski i ontervlcr whose Ira^K Kill 
tixsi t'vrrylhin>; Kit her lire 
\r\\ who found Ihe courage 
to live through Ihe love (tf <*u 
wrvspeiialm.in 



WM 



k THE OTHER SIDE OF 
THE MOUNTAIN* 



, Mm thru Th«r» . S. N JS. T»IIH»r S 1*4. Frl. S. 7:11.1 
PGj '■ IS Toililrr I 3S-S .Sal 2 IS. S. 7: IS. I IS. Twl lil*r| 
M , M Sun 7 IS. IS. I m T»IINrr SIMS 



Two of the audit team's mem 
bers are graduate students from thi 
School of Business Administratior 
One is an accounting major and th 
other is majoring in Busines 
Administration. Gillett, the ac 
counting major said the audi 
"wouldn't have worked if peopl< 
were picked because of thei 
constituency." 

However, Gregory, the Busines 
Administration major said "I can' 
argue against having an un 
dergraduate student because thest 
are services" he said referring t< 
the many varied services availabli 
for students in the Campus Center 
"There are aspects of the buildinc 
that can't be measured in dollars 
and cents," he added. 

Both men had high praise foi 
Dean the team director. "He is tht 
best man available to run the 
audit," said Gregory. 

Despite the apparent futility o1 
getting an undergraduate studem 
on the audit team O'Keefe ap- 
peared to remain confident. 

"We will get to the bottom of the 
allegations," said O'Keefe. 

"We are on schedule," saic 
Dean. The report will be ready the 
first week of August. 





CLOCHinO 
KM 

men a 
women 



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■T&RCrtASE 

J (v/flH this ap) 

j THE AREA'S LARGEST 



pre washed jeans 

white painter pants 

denim skirts 

work shirts 

farmer overalls 

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ft rairfield Mall chicopee 



16 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY. JULY U, lf73 



Funeral for 
a friend 



by John Fisher 



Mark said they got the news at 4:00 a.m. when the cops came to the 
door. The cops hadn't been able to reach them any other way because 
they didn't have a telephone. 

Mary Vinette had been riding with a friend on route 102 in Stock- 
bridge. At about 1 :15 a.m. on Wednesday, July 9 the friend lost control of 
the car and hit a ledge at the Mass Turnpike overpass. Both women were 
killed instantly. 

Mary lived in Puftcn with her sister, Bob and Mark. It's funny. I met 
her sister a couple of times and I can't think of her name now. That's not 
important. 

The important thing is that Mary Vinette worked here as part of the 
Student Organizing Project staff, and now she's dead. She was a won- 
derful person, and now she's dead. 

I didn't hear the news until about 1:30 that afternoon when Anette 
came into the office and told me. There was an important meeting later 
that afternoon in the Student Senate office. There were too many people 
in the office for the air conditioner to handle and tempers were short. 
Some of us at the meeting had been very close to Mary and some of us 
only knew her as the woman with dark hair who sat at the desk 
to the right of the door as you came into the SOP office. 

People like Mary never realize how valuable they are to others. She 
had worked incredibly long hard hours at shit pay and she would probably 
have been embarassed to have someone attribute what she did to idealism. 

But she was more than just a sister struggling to make life a little 
better. She was a warm person who would make you feel better by her 
presence. She was a source of energy to anyone she worked with. The 
effect was often so subtle that you weren't quite sure Why you felt good 
when she was there. It was only when she wasn't there that you realized 
something was missing. 

People with that quality aren't usually told about their importance 
when they are alive and almost never get much notice in the obituary 
columns. The Hampshire Gazette didn't even spell her name properly. 

Mary hadn't been happy the last couple of months. Her life was certainly 
no picnic, and I don't think she could bring herself to believe that people 
loved her. The last time I saw her was at a party during the 
budget cuts activity last semester. I was a little stoned and feeling less 
inhibited than usual. I tried in some awkward manner to tell her how much 
everyone cared for her, how much I cared for her. She just smiled and said 
something nice. But she didn't really hear what I was saying. A couple of 
weeks after that she drove to the West Coast to get off by herself for a 
while. 

I just never got the chance to talk to her again when she got back in 
the area. 

I sometimes lie to myself and congratulate myself about how liberated 
I am, about how far past the old male hang-ups I am. How in touch with 
myself I have become. When Annette told me about Mary I wanted to cry. 
Instead I kicked the file cabinet. 

Mary Vinette is dead. We went to her funeral on Saturday morning. 
We took part in the meaningless and barbaric ritual because we wanted to 
do something. But we don't have the power to the one thing that would 
mean something. Mary Vinette is dead. I don't even know if I am writing 
this for her or for myself. 

Actually it's all very simple. It doesn't make any difference now. The 
struggle will go on. It's just that someone who was very important for a lot 
of people is dead. Just like a lot of other people who were once very im- 
portant are. We try to deal with that fact by saying to each other all the 
things we should have said to her. But the basic fact remains. Mary is 
dead. 

— Correspondence — 

character assassination 



Sweet smoke of rhetoric! Naturally I expected response to my article 
concerning the AIB presentation of July 1 in the Student Union Ballroom. I 
was not, however, prepared for the cacographic masturbation that spurt 
from the pen of Harvey Yazijian. [ "Sweet Jesus, " Harvey, I'm surprised 
the pages didn't stick together !\ Your mastery of the English language 
brings to memory a certain ill-favored vice president of days gone by. 

I don 't intend to mince words or attack ad hominem [the first law of 
courteous debate] as did Mr. Yazijian in his "coherently developed and 
articulate smooth flow of ideas" that COLLEGIAN readers were subjected 
to last week. Rather than face the perplexing question of who financially 
backs the Assassination Bureau, Mr. Yazijian has spent his well paid time 
counting the words in my sentences in order to lead a rambunctious 
assault on my "tortured syntax. " For an encore, he repeats MY question in 
his reach -the -people jive: "Where are YOU at?" 

As for serious doubts on MY honesty, ethics, and politics I would 
suggest that "if YOU are at all moved by truthful and ethical practices" 
that your organization give the same, THE SAME, Harvey, slide presen- 
tation to the public as to a private press showing that I attended by AIB 
invitation. Why the discrepancy, Mr. Yazijian? 

As dull as I am, I find it most interesting that an organization of your 
calibre should heed such extreme attention to the meanderings of the 
boring, unimaginative, and above all shoddy journalist, one £. Patrick 
McQuaid. You have only assigned my boring personage to the boundaries 
north of Springfield leaving the territorial limitations of the United States to 
your own intriguing personality. 

Never once do I claim belief in the conclusions set down by the 
Warren Commission; I have only questioned the politics of the 
Assassination Information Bureau and would suggest a re-reading of the 
original article. I agree that this is a "far too important and grim issue for all 
of us" and yet Mr. Yazijian refers to one citizen's questions as a "farce." 

I hold myself totally accountable for the contents of that article; even 

responsible for the "and staff" who shared my byline because they were 

afraid to have their name aside such controversy. Although the 

"misleading" headline is not my doing, I agree that it should have had a 

more appropriate title such as "Cover Story " for a variety of reasons. 

E. Patrick McQuaid 



Comments 



Ever since the University finally 
emptied out in late May I have 
begun to notice a strange 
phenomenon. The average age of 
the people who hang around the 
Campus Center seems to have 
declined along with the number of 
people on campus. Where once it 
was commonplace to see a 
relatively mixed bag of age groups 
in the Campus Center, now all I 
seem to see are middle aged 
workers trying to cope with what 
can only be described as children. 
There are kids all over the place, 
and I could swear I never saw so 
many around during the regular 
school year. 

Of course, there may be a per- 
fectly rational explanation for this. 
There is generally a fairly sizable 
number of orientation Freshmen 
wandering about with a bewildered 
look on their faces, making them 
look younger than their com- 
paratively tender years. Also, many 
of the older academic hangers on 
have seemed to have moved on to 
greener pastures for the summer. 
Deep down inside, however, I know 
these explanations aren't adequate. 

One doesn't really notice this 
trend toward youth unless one 
spends a significant amount of time 
around the pinball machines. 
Besides the normal electronic 
junkies, who never seem to go 
away, the Campus Center has been 
beset by a veritable plague of 
aspiring pfnball wizards. Unless you 
get there fairly early, you will almost 
never see them actually playing 






mtmrn 



fWM&tyif&S 



by Robert Golner 



In my endless search for new 
material for a commentary, an idea I 
once got from a picture of the 
unfinished library building kept 
coming to my mind. The fact was 
that the picture kept reminding me 
of the tower in THE TOWERING 
INFERNO. So I thought of the 
great idea of disaster films based on 
UMass which would come under 
the umbrella title of UMASS — 
ANOTHER DISASTER. 

For those of you who are on the 
floor laughing and for those of you 
who are about to turn the page, 
please hear me out. This statement . 
is not far from the truthl Think 
about it. Aren't the Fine Arts 
Center, the sinking library, the 
AWFUL WAFFLE (Campus 
Center), and the second largest 
place in population per square area 
(Southwest), all disasters? These 
are only the physical disasters and 
who ever heard of building a 
mammoth university on swamp- 
land. It just can't be donel What 
about employees of a state in- 
stitution (not to mention any 
names) that get paid a yearly in- 
come that exceeds even the 
governor) This has to be someone's 
disaster. Is it not a disaster when a 



the 
children's 

hour 

by Brian Harvey 



: 



pinball. There is a good reason for 
this, though: they run out of 
whatever money they have been 
able to scrape up by about ten in 
the morning. 

They don't go away when they 
run out of quarters. They hang 
around the machines, sometimes 
harrassing passersby for money, 
generally content to simply watch 
other addicts satiate themselves. 
Occasionally, one of the more 
obnoxious of the crowd will kill a 
few minutes by checking out the 
change slots on all the machines, 
which is fine unless you're trying to 
play against a particularly tricky 
magnet with a bad flipper when a 
small hand reaches between your 
legs in search of forgotten change. 

These kids can be annoying, 
especially if you haven't had a 
match in sixteen games, but the 
serious pinball player cannot afford 
to ignore them; they know too 
much. They are the ones who know 
which machines can't be tilted, 
where to kick "Drop-a-Card" to get 
three free games, and how to make 



the change machine take your 
dollar. Oddly enough, all they 
usually demand in return for such 
services is the privilege of standing 
around your machine offering help- 
ful comments. 

So far I have only spoken of the 
younger set, but there is a whole 
spectrum of pre-Collegiates who 
use the Campus Center for a street 
corner. The pinball wizards can be 
anywhere from eighteen months to 
fifteen years, but their older 
brothers and sisters have other 
pursuits on their minds. They break 
up into couples and try to look like 
Joe and Mary Umie (why, I'll never 
know). Joe and Ma r y Umie 
couldn't possibly care less, of 
course, but at least it keeps these 
kids off the street. 

It should by now be ob jj that 
these kids are coming to the 
Campus Center from Amherst and 
other surrounding communities. 
Since school got out in June, they 
have had to find something to do 
with their time, so they hang out in 
the Campus Center. This is fine 
with me; whatever money they are 
spending while they are here only 
goes to help pay off the debt on the 
Campus Center. But it is sobering 
to think that the local kids consider 
the Campus Center to be the Big 
Time. Someone should get the 
Town of Amherst to build a few 
pool halls and other more ap- 
propriate spots for the kids to hang 
around in the summer. Anyone 
who spends their summer here is 
going to grow up warped. 



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PLOT LINE NO. 1 (THE 
TOWERJMG INFERNO AND 
AIRPORT 75) - A massive fire 
breaks out on the 23rd floor of the 
library (which obviously turns it into 
a towering inferno). On the 26th 
floor, to his usual tough luck, sits 
Chancellor Bromery reading The 
Making of the President. When it is 



told them to go jump in a lake. They 
decide to hold a massive swim 
party to which all the Whitmore 
employees are invited. Mourning 
the deaths of the President and 
Chancellor, they all have a good 
time at their designated party spot 
— the Campus Pond. Swim time is 
called and everyone jumps into the 



UMass — another disaster 



grade of F does not count, leaving 
an all F and one A student with a 
4.0 average? This I deem the 
charming disaster. What about 
forced housing, forced meal plans, 
and abundant exorbitant fees that 
are paid every registration date? A 
pocketbook disaster?? 

One could go on and on and pick 
out every loop hole, injustice, rip- 
off, stupidity, etc. which are so 
abundant at this University, but 
let's get back to the original idea: 
UMASS - ANOTHER 

DISASTER. 

I've always wanted to write 
something based on that title, but 
can only get as far as the plot lines. 
I will now throw them out for some 
genius who will use the ideas to 
make a million dollars and who I will 
then sue for two million for stealing 
them from me. HERE GOESI 



finally realized that he is trapped on 
(he 26th floor (three days later), 
President Wood flies in with his 
diamond studded million dollar 
helicopter and rescues him. The 
climax occurs near the end when a 
Boeing 747 is veered off course and 
accidently crashes into the Wood 
helicopter, sucking its passengers 
and crew into outer space, it an 
ends happily when Governor 
Dukakis announces that he has 
done away with the jobs of 
President and Chancellor of the 
University and that the deletion of 
their annual salaries has brought 
the state out of its massive deficit. 

PLOT LINE NO. 2 (HEATWAVE 
AND JAWS) - As the air 
conditioning breaks down in the 
Financial Aid Office in Whitmore, 
the employees decide to take the 
advice of one angry student who 



pond. Little did they know that 
sharks had found anew breeding 
ground among the mire and trash in 
the Campus Pond. All ends well 
when Governor Dukakis announces 
that he has done away with the 
administration of the University 
which he found as useless as the 
students, and does not give a hoot 
who runs the University, adding 
that the cutting of the ad- 
ministration will keep the state out 
of a deficit for the next three years. 
PLOT LINE NO. 3 (EARTH- 
QUAKE) - The University, 
struck by an earthquake, is totally 
destroyed. But all ends well when 
Governor Dukakis announces that 
this doing away with the UMass 
Campus will keep the state from a 
deficit for the next 200 years. 
Confidentially he was heard to 
mumble: I never liked the place any 
way. 



Music 'n Dance Review 

The Maria Blakey Dancers 

and 
The Unity Ensemble 

-see page 1 




THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



TELEPHONE 545 1982 
BUSINESS 5450617 




ian 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1975 



Student Legal Service 
Office 

A motion is pending before the Board of 
Trustees which calls for the right of 
students to be represented by the student 
Legal Service Office at UMass in criminal 
matters and in suits against the Univer- 
sity. See page 2 



UMass Tenants 
Association 

Married students, struggling for over a 
year in what started as a fight for a rent 
rollback and evolved into UMass Tenants 
Association and plans for a cooperative, 
may soon manage their apartments at the 
University, Lincoln, and North Village 
complexes — See page 5 



The Union Stereo 
Co-op 

Despite the apparent inability of the 
Union Stereo Coop to attain a sufficient 
space allocation on campus, the consumer 
organization will continue to provide an 
"alternative way of purchasing", ac- 
cording to Dick Moulding, one of the coop's 
founders — See page 5 



UMass Hoopmen 
Jump Leagues 

"Membership in this league coupled 
with the continuence of some of our long 
standing New England rivalries and 
games against selected nationally ranked 
schools could provide Massachusetts with 
an outstanding basketball schedule," 
according to Athletics Director Frank 
Mclnerney — See page 2 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1975 



Student Legal Service Office 

"The University is required to provide these additional services 
under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLI.EGiAN 



by Richard Wright 

Student's rights have been a 
continuing theme at UMass for as 
many years as students have 
recognized their collective right to 
be represented in the decision 
making process here. Another 
corner in students rights will be 
turned next month if a motion 
before the UMass Trustees gets a 
favorable vote. 

The motion calls for the right of 
students to be represented by the 
student Legal Service Office at 
UMass in criminal matters and in 
suits against the University. 

John O'Keefe, president of the 



student senate here introduced the 
motion to the Trustees who sought 
a legal opinion from William E. 
Searson, General Counsel for the 
University. 

Searson's legal opinion came in a 
memorandum of July 7 stating "In 
my opinion, the answer is 
negative." 

Searson stated the only legal 
argument offered by student 
representatives and their attorneys 
"...is simply that the University is 
required to provide these additional 
services under the First Amend- 
ment to the United States Con- 
stitution." 

In a letter sent last January by 



counsel tor the Student Organizing 
Committee, a New York law firm 
stated, "...our review of the file 
disclosed no legitimate reason for 
attempting to prevent the student 
attorneys from litigating against the 
University on behalf of student 
clients." 

More recently O'Keefe has said 
the students should be able to seek 
representation in suits against the 
University from LSO because it is 
supported by money collected from 
students each year. 

As part of the argument by 
Searson in his memorandum to the 
Trustees he cites a case in Ohio 
where the State Attorney General 



28 season tradition with YanCon ends 

Minutemen join EICBL 



by John McHale 

Association in a new league will 
end a twenty eight season tradition 
for UMass when the school breaks 
its basketball ties with the Yankee 
Conference in June 1976. Frank 
Mclnerney, Director of Athletics 
announced recently that the 
University of Massachusttts will 
join the newly formed Eastern 
Independent Collegiate Basketball 
League for the 1976-77 season. 
Other members of the league will 
be Duquesne, George Washington, 
Pittsburgh, Penn State, Rutgers, 
Villanova, and West Virginia. 

"The Yankee Conference has 
been having organizational 
problems all along. I believe that it 
will either be dissolved or have to 
change format dramatically. Right 
now it's not serving its member 
schools. It lost that ability some 
time ago. The conference's 
weaknesses have been under 
discussion for years and years. 
We've been thinking about this 
move out of the Yankee Con- 
ference for quite a while. We're 
certainly not the first to make a 
move. Last year Vermont an- 
nounced the elimination of its 
Yankee Conference football team 
and started emphasizing skiing and 
hockey. New Hampshire em- 
phasizes hockey to a great degree, 
so other sports in the conference 
suffer. Rhode Island has turned its 
back on the conference by pursuing 
a national pattern with Jack Kraft in 
basketball," said Mclnerney. 

The Athletic Director also 
pointed out that the infamous 
Eastern College Athletic Con- 
ference decision, eschewing 
YanCon champ UMass in favor of 
runner-up UConn really had 
nothing to do with going from the 
conference to the league. 

"The point is that these other 
schools I mentioned are pursuing 
their own interests, and now we are 
too. We had the attitude where if a 
situation presented itself we'd 
listen. The ECAC selection had 




said state funds could not be used 
to finance a student defender office 
at Ohio University. 

O'Keefe said "The money can 
only be considered as state funds 
because they collect it, actually the 
money comes from the students". 

A spokesperson from the LSO 
office said precedents do exist for 
having a state institution providing 
for the means to sue the state. The 
example was given of a public 
defender for a defendent charged 
with a crime against the state. 

Another example cited by the 
spokesperson was the state 
providing counsel for an indigent 
family faced with losing their 
children to the state. Both cases are 
examples where the state provides 
for the defense of the person or 
persons to be prosecuted by the 
state. 

The spokesperson added that a 
common sense analogy can be 
drawn from the federal government 
providing for legal services for low- 
income families which primarily 
involves litigation against federal 
and state agencies such as Social 
Security and Welfare. 

One part of the memorandum 
from Searson directly questions the 
legitimacy of the Legal Services 
Governing Board established by the 
Student Senate to oversee the LSO 
operations. Searson states the 
policy statement of the governing 
board which allows the legal 
services staff to represent students 
in criminal matters and suits against 
the University may have no weight 
of authority because, "To my 
knowledge, the approval of the 
Board of Trustees has not been 
sought for these 'Laws'." 



The Chairperson of the LSO 
Governing Board, Michael 
Parkhurst, was unavailable for 
comment. 

Searson further states, 
"However, the Trustees may as a 
matter of discretion decide to 
provide these services." 

The memorandum continues, "(n 
short, if the Board of Trustees votes 
that any contract for an attorney 
shall specifically allow such ser- 
vices, then the official duties of the 
position would allow such activity." 

Presently six students have a suit 
pending against the University 
which involves the failure to pay the 
five per cent interest on deposits 
students make when residing in 
dormitories. A vote at next month's 
Trustees meeting in support of the 
motion by O'Keefe would allow 
students to seek legal assistance at 
no cost for such a suit, according to 
O'Keefe. 

Presently the LSO office provides 
criminal representation before 
arrangment. According to an LSO 
spokesperson if a student is 
arrested or for any reason desires to 
seek out legal advise on a pending 
court involvement they can do so. 

The O'Keefe motion comes at a 
time when the LSO office has just 
undergone a major staffing change. 
A new director and two staff at- 
torneys have been hired this month 
to replace outgoing Director 
William Dorsch and staff attorney 
Lisa Edberg. 

Assuming the directorship is 
Attorney Ira Horowitz, who will be 
working with staff attorney's Nancy 
Brockway and James Starr. The 
LSO office will remain open during 
the ssmmer from 9 to 5 weekdays. 



The next time Minutemen via for a rebound. It will be as 
members in the newly formed Eastern Inter-Collegiate 
Basketball League. 



56 MAIN 
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nothing to do with it. We believe 
this move will elevate our basketball 
program to a higher plateau. There 
wasn't this negativism in our 
thinking," Mclnerney explained. 
Jack Leaman, head basketball 
coach at UMass, mirrored 
Mclnerney's views: "We were 
invited to the EICBL months before 
the ECAC made its decisions, and 
were looking very favorably upon 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



EDi IORS 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

ADVERTISING 



CONTRIBUTORS 



Dan LaBonte, Debbie Schafer 

Ken Shapiro 

Alan Anastos, Peter Birnbaum 



B.J. Roche, Richard Wright, Tyla Michelove, Mike Kneeland, 
Aaron Huber, Bonnie Ruth Allen, Thomas Balonek, Peter Backus, John 
Bally, Andrew Mckenzie, Paul Logue, Dave Sokol, Mike Kostek, Bill 
Hasson, Zamir Nestelbaum, Mike Moyle, Kris Jackson, Stuart Cudlitz, 
John McHale, Edward Cohen, Katie Freygang, Cindy Toomey. 

Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The staff is 

responsible for its content and no faculty member or administrator 

reads it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. Unsigned 

pditorials represent the view of this paper. They do not necessarily 

eflect the views of the student body, faculty, or administration. Signed 

ditorials, columns, reviews, cartoons, and letters represent the per 

>nal views of the authors. 

The office of the Massachusetts Summer Collegian is on the second 
floor of the Student Union on the campus of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 01002, telephone: 545 1982 



joining. The ECAC selection did not 
bear a major influence on our 
decision to move up." 

Apparently the situation was 
approached from a positive 
viewpoint, and it would be safe to 
say that in a case where the ECAC 
had favored UMass, the change 
would still have come about. Both 
Leaman's and Mclnerney's words 
also lead one to conclude that the 
recruiting program and overall team 
performance will improve with the 
transition to the EICBL. It's a sports 
tenet that a more demanding 
schedule with big opponents 
almost automatically improves a 
team previously playing mediocre 
foes and games without much 
meaning. 

"This move should help us to be 
able to talk to better players 
because of the major teams we will 

continued on page 9 

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open 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. daily 



Perspective 




by B.J. Roche 



College, in this country, is pretty 
much a sacred cow. It is something 
most of us were funneled into since 
those grade school achievement 
tests separated the "college 
oriented" from the "vocationally 
oriented". We unquestioningly 
accepted the dubious honor and 
took all the proper math courses 
and foreign languages we would 
probably never use, played the SAT 
game, the "where'd ya get in?" 
roulette, and finally ended up with 
what sometimes seems like four 
more years of high school. Only it is 
worse, because we were under the 
impression that college would be 
different; that we, as consumers 
paying for a higher education, 
would have some kind of guarantee 
of the quality of that education in 
return for the guarantee of paying 
tuition and abiding by the rules of 
the institution. But we do not have 
any such quarantee. 

In Spring of 1974, the Student 
Ciovernment Association set out to 
find an answer to the problem of 
the one way contractual 
agreement, and the one which 
seemed most feasible was that of a 
Student Union, open to all students 
who pay fees and tuition, to act as a 
bargaining agent on such issues as 
tuition, fees and academic 
requirements. 

The concept of a Student Union 
is not new, although it has not been 
instituted on a large scale in this 
country. (A few small colleges have 
tried it with varying degrees of 
success.) In Britain, the National 
Union of Students (N.U.S.) 
provides a variety of services to 
more than 350,000 student 
members of that organization. The 
Executive branch of the union 
negotiates with the government 
directly for scholarship and grant 
funding, something unheard of in 
the United States. It also provides a 
travel service with tour packages 
and airline flights at sometimes half 
the cost of commercial airlines. The 
Union also owns an insurance 
company, with policies available for 
anything from personal belongings 



We were under the impression that college would be 

different; that paying for a higher education would 

give us some kind of guarantee of the quality of that 

education. But we do not have any such guarantee. 



to life insurance. The N.U.S. is a 
federation of approximately 750 
smaller unions at higher 
educational institutions all over 
Great Britain, and membership 
dues are usually included in the fees 
for the university which the student 
is attending. The Union has 
recently come under attack from its 
own members for being too leftist 
and militant, but the N.U.S. still 
maintains more power than any 
type of similar organization in the 
U.S. 

At its 27th Congress in August of 
1974, the National Student 
Association endorsed the concept 
of a Student Union, and set forth 
various resolutions to build a 
Student Union. The reasons 
declared for a union were mainly 
economic ones, the "threat" of 
faculty unionization was also cited. 
It was stated that faculty 
unionization could infringe upon 
what little power Student 
Government already wields. 

In the same declaration it was 
stated that, "It is the belief of the 
USNSA that both student 
governments and student unions 
should exist, as they serve different 
purposes for students." At UMass, 
it is now a question of whether or 
not the two can co-exist in peace. 
Spring of 1974 marked the birth of 
the Student Organizing Project, a 
group funded and blessed by the 
Student Senate. The task of the 
Project was to organize a Student 
Union through various economic 
projects and grass roots education 
and organization of students. 



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Remarkable progress has been 
made in the economic level, one 
result being the Student owned 
Federal Credit Union, one of the 
very few in the country. The Credit 
Union officially started this Spring, 
and is open to students and 
workers at the University, giving 
low cost loans and higher interest 
savings accounts, as well as food 
stamp sales. The Stereo Co-op is 
another product of the SOP's 
efforts, providing stereo equipment 
and albums at lower prices with a 



/ / 

TH RCVOH 




nominal membership fee. The 
Union of Student Employees, 
USE., developed under SOP 
assistance, is having its hearing 
before the Labor Relations Board 
this week, yet another step forward 
for UMass students. Such events 
as the housing hearings, (and 
resulting lawsuits) have been 
undertaken by the SOP, and vast 
amounts of research and in- 
formation has been compiled 
regarding everything from housing 
to the Campus Center 
management. 

The organization effort was aided 
this Spring by the Student Action 
Committee, (S.A.C.) a group which 
developed over concern about the 
budget cuts. At the Town Meeting 
held during the Spring Semester, 
and at the workshops held during 
the resulting strike, petitions were 
sent around endorsing the Enabling 
Policy, a type of Wagner Act for 
students, giving them the right to 
collective bargaining. The Policy 
has been endorsed by the Student 
Senate, and will be before the 
Trustees in the Fall. The S.A.C. is 
working through the summer with 
some thirty people planning the 
course of action for the fall, and 



helping with mailings to students 
informing them of the budget 
situation. 

Still the question of SGA and its 
future role remains. Last Spring, 
the Senate voted to reorganize the 
Student Organizing Committee, the 
virtual ways and means committee, 
setting guidelines for the Project. It 
was felt that the reorganization was 
needed to provide a broader base of 
support for the Project, and open 
up its ranks. Though the move was 
supposedly intended to involve 
more people in the unionization 
effort, it was seen by some to be a 
step by the SGA to gain more 
control over the SOP workings of 
the union, in essence insuring its 
own future as well as that of a 
union's. Organizing progress was 
being made, but political infighting 
developed within the SOC over 
various issues such as SAC in- 
volvement and hiring and firing 
decisions. The Committee is in 
virtual limbo at this point, although 
the Summer Organizing Project 
was allocated funds for continued 
work last week by the Senate's 
Executive Committee. 

Though the Project was funded 
at last Sunday's meeting, an ad- 
ditional action was the release of a 
position paper by Speaker Jon Hite 
on the topic of unionization. Hite 
criticized the Organizing Project for 
not having met its intended goals 
set last year. Hite went on to state 
that "the unification of student 
government has not occurred. The 
'concept' of a union has split the 
SGA as I believe it will split the 
student body once they become 
aware of the prospects and 
ramifications." 

Hite expressed concern over 
such issues as the SATF collec- 
tions, dues, and the structure of the 
union. He did not feel that a union 
could perform the same functions 
as adequately as the Senate can, 
and suggested replacing the SOP 
with two committees, one on 
economic development and the 
other on policy and planning. 

John Pepi, a worker for the SOP 
disputed the paper. "Now is not the 
time for people to start talking of 
structure, it should evolve at a later 
time, by a larger group of people 
than what we have here. Many 
members of the SGA get bad 
feedback from the State House. 



They think we have to deal with the 
Legislature. We are directing efforst 
to the Trustees. Students over 18 
have the right to sign int(\ con- 
tractual agreements, ano .ne 
Trustees must deal with that fact." 
John O'Keefe, President of the 
SGA is in favor of the unionization 
effort, and predicts that the Senate 
can work with a union, but must 
first have a change of structure. "I 
have confidence in people's abilities 
to come up with something, he 
said, and added, "we couldn't be 
any worse off than we are now." 

SOP Economic Development Co- 
ordinator John Fischer stated that 
the memorandum held a lot of valid 
questions, but that Hite "added 
two and two and got twenty-two." 
He sees the possibilities of a union 
bargaining on the issues of tuition 
and academics, while the SGA 
would continue on an ad- 
ministrative basis. 

The Organizing Project has set a 
summer conference for the 
weekend of August 8, to assess 
progress and determine the course 
of action for the fall. 

All involved in the organizing 
process agree that there are still 
many questions to be answered 
about the union. Since it is a fairly 
new idea in this country, perhaps it 
will be necessary to develop our 
own answers as we go along. Due 
to the nature of the occupation 
"student", a union may have to be 
different from the labor union as we 
know it. But all that matters now is 
that the exploration process 
continue. What lies beyond that is 
up to the students. 




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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY .23, 1975 



Patriots Arrive 

Fairbanks eyes play-off potential 



by Mike Kneeland 

The New England Patriots have 
come to summer training camp 
here with two main hopes, to get a 
good punter and improve the pass 
defense. 

Getting a decent punter, though, 
could be a problem. Those in camp 
are Dave Chappie, who finished off 
last year with the team, and free 
agents Rich Pelletier of Holy Cross, 
Chuck Ramsey of Wake Forest, and 
Mike Patrick of Mississippi State. 

Fairbanks says he is mainly 
looking for consistency. Each day 
his coaches record every punt's 
hang-time, distance, and trajectory. 
Fairbanks optimistically says he 
expects some "healthy com- 
petition" for the punting job, but no 
doubt he's watching the waiver 
wires very closely each night for 
potential punters. 

In the pass defense department, 
Fairbanks will most likely try to im- 
prove his young veteran players. 
Their fifth round draft choice, Steve 
Freeman, is a cornerback and he 
has looked good on the field, 
although it remains to be seen how 
he'll do against the likes of Vataha. 

Under the care of coach Red 
Miller, the Patriots are assembling 
what should be a very good of- 
fensive line tnis season and a great 
one for many seasons to come. 

There's 24- year old John Hannah 
from Alabama, a good bet for all- 
pro honors this year if he remains 
uninjured. At the other guard spot 
it'll probably be Steve Corbett, last 
year's number one draft choice 
from Boston College who missed 
the season with a neck injury. 
Corbett says he's "100 per cent in 
shape" and he looks it 

Then there's Russ Francis, this 
year's number one draft choice. 
He'll probably be playing behind 
Bob Windsor at tight end for a 
while. . . for a while. 

You can fill in the rest of the 
names, which spell one thing: pass 
protection for Jim Plunkett. 
Fairbanks believes strongly that if 
Plunkett can get some time, the 
pass interceptions will go down and 
the receptions up. 

Play-off hopes? Fairbanks came 
into camp last year telling everyone 
his team had to develop a winning 
attitude. He says that happened 
and is now saying his team "should 
expect to win." 




WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Mlks Kntilmd 

Stave Corbett taking a breather a number one draft choice 
to make Jim Plunkett's job a bit easier. 

to make the team again this year. 



With a little bit of luck, his squad 
could have a 10-4 season. Although 
Fairbanks himself won't put his 
Oklahoma neck on a New England 
limb, pro football writers are betting 
the team will split with Miami, split 
with Buffalo, lose to another team 
they should lose to and lose to 
another team they shouldn't lose 
to, whoever those teams might be. 

Wild-card spot? Perhaps. But 
most people here seem to think that 
depends on Cincinnati and their 
weak division. 

All in all, there's a good at- 
mosphere in- camp. People aren't 
already saying wait 'till next yaar. 
Under Fairbanks, next year is this 
year. 

ON THE S/DEUNES: Former 
UMass star Steve Schubert should 
have slightly better than even odds 




EATING AND DRINKING 

AMHERST, 
ANNOUNCING 



Fairbanks is high on Steve as a 
special teams player and he's fully 
recovered from his injury. . . It's like 
Holy Cross day here. The Crusaders 
have three players here now with 
two more coming in Saturday. But 
it'll take more than prayers to keep 
them here including Captain Jon 
Morris who's probably seen his last 
days in uniform. . . .You can't say 
the UMass police don't treat 
everyone alike. A UMass detective 
brought his young son to practice 
Sunday, and Monday morning the 
detective was directing ticketing 
operations of Patriots' cars saying 
towing will start soon . . . And the 
elephant testacle award goes to 
Chuck Fairbanks himself for staying 
in the scaffolding rig 40-ft. in the air 
during the first few minutes of an 
electrical storm Sunday afternoon. 




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UMTA: 



After a year of bargaining, they may 
soon manage their own apartments 



by Aaron Huber 

Married students, struggling for 
over a year in what started as a 
fight for a rent rollback and evolved 
into UMass Tenants Association 
and plans for a cooperative, may 
soon manage their apartments at 
the University, Lincoln, and North 
Village complexes. 

The contract between the co-op 
and the University has been 
negotiated but is awaiting Trustee 
approval. The UMTA was hopeful 
Trustees would vote on the co-op 
Aug. 6, however, "It looks slim that 



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the proposal will reach the Trustees 
by the August 6th meeting," Pat 
Walker, UMTA member said in an 
interview last week. "We say the 
administration is stalling, but the 
administration is telling us they are 
being realistic," Walker said. 

After months of negotiations the 
UMTA and the University ad- 
ministrators drafted and signed an 
agreement on May 30, guaran- 
teeing a co-op upon Trustee ap- 
proval. One stipulation in the 
agreement was that the contract 
would be forwarded to the full 
Board of Trustees by Aug. 6. 
However, in a telephone interview 
last week, Or. Robert Gage, Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs, and 
administrative negotiator with the 
UMTA, said he didn't know when 
the Trustees would vote on the 
contract. "We agreed to discuss 
the possibilities of a cooperative, 
but there are a lot of legal problems 
to overcome before it can be im- 
plemented," he said. 

Gage also said the administration 
thinks the co-op is a viable idea 
because it will give the students a 
chance to do some work and would 
be an advantage to them by 
lowering costs. 

"It's new to the Trustee," Walker 
said, "and they are approaching it 
slowly." He added that the contract 
is solid, and doubts the Trustees 
will find any problems in it. 

Despite doubt when the Trustees 
will vote on the contract, but 
confident it will be approved, 
tenants are preparing to manage 
their apartments. 

On July 30, a referendum 
designed and sponsored jointly by 
the UMTA and the administration 
will be taken to let tenants decide 
whether or not they are going to 
join the co-op, Walker said. Non- 
members will pay higher rent, since 



they will not share in the work ' 
necessary to .ower costs, he said. 
For members of the co-op, savings 
in rent will be from $12.50-$17.00 
per month. 

Work members can do which will 
lower costs includes cleaning 
laundry rooms and hallways, 
sweeping walks, shoveling snow, 




"We say the ad- 
ministration is stalling, but 
the administration is telling 
us they are being realistic." 
- Pat Walker 

and cutting grass. Each family will 
be expected to contribute 2-3 hours 
per month for maintenance of 
common areas. 

Money the co-op manages to 
save through reduced costs wifl go 
back to the tenants in form of a rent 
rebate at the end of each year, 
Walker said. Besides saving tenants 
money, the co-op expects to save 
the University $100,000 in fiscal 
year 1976. The co-op will be able to 
save the University money by 



managing the apartments more 
efficiently then the University has in 
the past, according to Walker. 

Walker explained there are two 
key ideas which concern how the 
cooperative management will be 
set-up. One is to make possible 
decentralized control of the 
apartments by residents — over ten 
organizations are now involved in 
the operation of Married Student 
Housing (MSH); the other is to 
establish a centralized management 
for all operational aspects of MSH 
— co-op members will hire a 
professional staff to run the 
complexes and will have direct 
control over everything that goes 
on. 

The management means that 
tenants will be responsible for th»* 
services, staff and maintenance of 
their living units. "Tenants will take 
more pride in their apartments if 
they know they have some control 
over it," Walker said. 

The co-op will also be working 
together for the common good of 
all. Tenants are already running a 
day camp for the children of the 
complexes, he said. 

According to Walker, the 
cooperative proposed by the 
UMTA is modeled after a similar 
one at the University of Minnesota 
at St. Paul, which has been 
operating successfully for the last 
five years. The UMTA is confident 
such a co-op can work here, he 
said. If approved, the co-op will be 
the first of its kind in New England 
and the second ;n the country. 

"This is something that can be 
done in the dormitories," Walker 
said. He adJed that the work had 
been done by the UMTA and all 
that was needed was action by 
students. 



The Union Stereo Co-op 

all the resources, and no place with space 



by Bonnie Ruth Allen 

Although the Campus Center 
Board of Governors (BOG) failed to 
allocate office space to the Union 

Stereo Coop (USC), the consumer 
organization will continue to 
provide an "alternative way of 
purchasing", according to Dick 
Moulding, one of the coop's 
founders. 

"We were willing to take just 
about anything and the BOG gave 
us nothing," according to Marilyn 
Berman, president of the coop. The 
space would have been used to 
display equipment for comparison, 
hold meetings, store equipment, set 
up a library of catalogues and 
consumer reports, and possibly to 
create a stereo repair shop. 

John Fisher, economic 
development coordinator for the 
Student Organizing Project (SOP) 
and an advisor to the USC said that 
no concrete reasons were given for 



denial. "I am very confident that 
one way or another we will get 
space in the fall," he said. 

John Hayes, director of the BOG, 
said "I'd like to say there's a 
possibility but everything's been 
assigned." 

The USC offers information and 
discounts on most of the major 
brands of audio equipment in- 
records, speakers, and 



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cartridges, and claims to have 
saved students thousands of dollars 
in the few months of its existence 
by selling records 44 per cent below 
list price and other equipment with 
only an 8 per cent mark-up for 
overhead. 

In addition, the coop offers 
counseling and information for 
members and non-members, home 
delivery and setting up of equip- 
ment, audio classes, a no down- 
payment policy, immediate refunds 
on damaged merchandise, a factory 
warranty on everything sold, and 
simple repair service. 



Due to the present lack of space 
for a USC headquarters, Moulding 
travels from Hatfield three times a 
week to display catalogues of 

available equipment in the Campus 
Center Concourse on Mondays, 
Wednesdays, and Fridays from 
10:30 to 3:30. 

The objective of the Sound and 
Music Coop, which began in 
Springfield two and a half years 
ago, was to combat "massive 
capitalistic rip-offs", said Berman. 

Last spring, Dick Moulding went 
to the SOP with the idea of ex 
panding the Sound and Music 
Coop, and with their help organized 
and advertised the first meeting, 
which was attended by forty 
people. 

"We got immediate par- 
ticipation... from the forty members 
we grew rapidly. We now have 
about 120 members and expect a 
sharp rise in membership in the 
fall," said Berman. 

"We hope the space situation 
will improve as our numbers grow 
and the university realizes our 
importance and value to the 
students of this campus," said 
Berman. "We haven't gotten 
enough publicity and since we have 
no permanent space, it's hard for 
people to get in touch with us." 

A $5 per year membership fee, 
which Berman described as 
temporary, is required from 
students wishing to join the coop. 
There will be a meeting in the fall to 
discuss lowering the membership 
renewal fee to $3, said Berman. 

Despite the lack ot space, the 
USC has high hopes for a long 
existence and a more cooperative 
work program in the fall. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1975 




Bicentennial Lecture Series 




_ THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



ZEZ3 








John Bracey and daughter Kali 



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The summer Bicentennial lecture 
series continues next week with, 
"Nat Turner and the Southampton 
Slave Revolt." The lecture will be 
presented by John Bracey at 2:00 
p.m., Tuesday, July 29 in the 
Student Union Colonial Lounge. 



Bracey is chairman of the W.E.B. 
DuBois Department of Afro- 
American Studies at UMass. He 
has co-edited several volumes on 
various aspects of the black ex- 
perience including, Black 
Nationalism in America, The Afro- 
Americans: Selected Documents, 
and eight volumes in the series. 
Explorations in the Black Ex- 
perience. 



Bracey is a member of the 
editorial board of Bobbs-Merril 
Black Studios Reprint Series. His 
major scholarly interests include 
black social history, black 
ideologies and movements, and 
definitions of the black experience. 

The Bicentennial lecture series is 
free and open to the public. 



Local 



Concerts 



Rusty Nail (Sunderland), 



Jury 23-29 
TRACY NELSON & MOTHER EARTH 
Jury 27 

James Montgomery Bond — Shea's Grove (Chicopee), July 25,26 
Vassar Clements — Shaboo Inn (Willimantic, Ct. ), July 25 ($3) 
Fat - Supermarket (Springfield), July 24-26 
Widespread Depression —Rusty Nail, July 23 
Real Tears - Steak Out (Amherst), July 23-26 
Some of My Best Friends — Rusty Nail, July 24-26 
Dynamic Sex Machine — T.O.C. (UMass), July 24-26 
Little Fire (Farewell Tour) — Red Pantry (Belchertown), July 24-26 
Home Cookin' — Lazy River (Northampton), July 24-27 
Jim K Band - Lazy River, July 23 

Urban Dontas Band — Highland Lounge (Springfield), July 25-27 
Bruce Mac Kay and Handpicked — Red Pantry, July 27 
Jeanie Stahl & Mason Daring — Chelsea House Cafe and Folklore 
Center (W. Brattleboro, Vt), July 25, 26 

Johnny Walker Blues Band — 5th Alarm (Springfield), July 23-27 
Real Tears - Rusty Nail, Jury 29 

Bruce MacKay and Handpicked — Bemardston Inn (Bernardston) 
July 25 
Evergreen — Supermarket July 23 

Discos: 

Dial Tone Lounge (Hatfield) - Open nightly until 1 a.m. 

The Pub (Amherst) - Picadilly Discotheque Thurs. thru Sun. 

Top of the Campus (UMass) - Disco night every Wednesday 

Maxwell's (Hadley) - Open nightly, Jazz night every Sunday 

Rachid's (Hadley) - Open nightly until 1 a.m. 

Poor Richard's (Amherst) — Open nightly except Monday 

September's (Chicopee) - Open nightly 

Fifth Alarm (Springfield) - Disco Nights: Mon.. Tues., Wed. 



( T indicates tix on sale at Ticketron in CC Hotel lobby) 

UMASS 
Preservation Hall Jazz Band - July 23, Metawampe Lawn 

SPRINGFIELD 
The Osmonds — Munch - Aug. 7, Civic Center T 
Seals €r Croft - Aug. 9, Civic Center T 

Miss World U.S.A. Pagent [with Bobby Hope] - Aug. 17 CMc 
Center 

LENOX, Mass. {Music Inn) a/I T 
Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band — July 23 
Hot Tuna — Richard Torrance — Jury 26 
Bonnie Raitt — Aug. 9 
Jerry Jeff Walker — Aug. 16 
New Riders Of The Purple Sage — Aug. 30 

LENOX, Mass. [Tanglewood] all T 
Judy Collins — Liv Taylor — July 29 
Unda Ronstadt — Leo Kottke — Aug. 26 
David Crosby & Graham Nash — Aug. 30 

BOSTON 
Esther Phillips - July 23-27, Paul's Mall 
Larry Coryell — July 31 -Aug. 3, Jazz Workshop 

CAPE COD COUSSEUM, So. Hyannis, Mass. 
Poco — July 28 
Seals & Crofts — Aug. 2 



Preservation Hall Jazz Band 



Movies this week 

THURSDAY JULY 24 CC AUDITORIUM 8.00 PM 

p ';j- 0N o DAYS JOURNEY INTO NIGHT", by Eugene O'Neill. O'Neill's 
Pulitzer Pr.ze-w.nnmg play which mirrors the author's early turbulent life 
with pitiless and unrelenting truth, telescopes the action of several months 
into one super-charged day to provide a raw slice of family life and expose 
the shallowness, the absurdity, the cankerous pride, the insecurity, pathos 
weakness and love which make the family. 174 min. 
WEDNESDAY JULY 30 CC AUDITORIUM 8:00 PM. 

"FIREMEN'S BALL", by Miles Forman. The firemen of a small Czech 
y.llage stage a ball in honor of their aged chief: but the old man is quickly 
forgotten as the affair gives way to a torrent of catastrophies. A delicious 
parody-fable of Slavic bureaucracy. Initially it was a witty editorial on 
lifestyle in Eastern Europe. 




The Preservation Hall Jazz Band 
will be playing traditional New 
Orleans Jazz in a concert tonight, 
Wednesday, at 8:00 p.m. The 
concert location has been changed 
from Metawanpe Lawn to the Fine 
Arts Center Concert Hall. 

Preservation Hall is both a place 
and a band. 

Preservation Hall, the place, was 
founded in New Orleans in 1961 
and is kept in the style of old jazz 
clubs of the turn of the century. 
Every night, one of seven bands 
plays New Orleans jazz in the 
traditional style as it evolved in that 
citv. 

The Preservation Hall Jazz Band 
is based at Preservation Hall and 
tours extensively throughout the 
country. The band has played at all 
the major music festivals in the U.S. 
and Europe and is making its sixth 
consequetive appearance at 
UMass. 

Nobody in the current band is 
under sixty years old. "Big Jim" 
Robinson, the Band's oldest 
member, was born in 1890 in 
Louisiana. Robinson began playing 
trombone in an Army band during 
World War I. 




The Preservation Hall Jazz Band 



Two of the other four members 
of the band are brothers. Percy and 
Willie Humphrey were both born in 
New Orleans over seventy years 
ago. Percy is co- leader of the band 
while Willie sits in on clarinet. 

The other band members are 



"Cie" Frazier and "Sing" Miller 
Frazer, the band's drummer, is i 
veteran of Mississippi river boat; 
and has worked with Bessie Smith 
Miller has appeared with man\ 
bands during his career, playinc 
banjo, string bass and piano. 



Outdoor Program 

Wednesday, July 23 

4:00 p.m. Outdoor Program summer seminar series, "Dry Land Canoe 
Instruction." A discussion of the various canoe techniques. Meet in front 
of the Student Union. 

7:00 p.m. Outing Club Softball game at Boyden fields. All are 
welcome. 

Thursday, July 24 

5:00 p.m. Outing Club trip: rock climbing at Rose Ledge. No ex- 
perience necessary. Meet in front of the Outing Club equipment locker. 

7:30 p.m. Outdoor Program summer seminar series, "Hiking and 
Camping Equipment." Campus Center room 168-170. 

Friday, July 25 

3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Afternoon bicycle trip with distination to be 
determined hy trip participants. Meet in front of the Student Union. 

Tuesday, Jury 29 

5:00 p.m. Outing Club trip: canoeing on the Connecticut River. Meet 
at the Outing Club Canoe Barn. 

7:30 p.m. Outdoor Program summer seminar: "Hang Gliding." Bob 
Stewart from Sky Sports Inc. will be on hand for a film and discussion. A 
glider will also be displayed. Campus Center Auditorium. 



Lunch hour 



::'.'XK'.- 



music series 




The music hour on the Campus 
Center Concourse today, Wed- 
nesday, will feature Art Andrews of 
the UMass Physical Plant. Andrews 
will be playing all-time piano tunes 
beginning at 12:00 noon. 

The music hour series is designed 
so that people can enjoy their noon 
breaks listening to a variety of 
musical instruments and styles. The 
series will continue through August 
13. 




Rte. 9 

434 Russell St. 

At The Arco 

Station Next To 

Campus Plaza 

256-0107 



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Art you getting ripped off? 

Check out our prices and see if you are paying more 
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16 oz. PEPSI $1.25 six pack 
12 oz. cans COKE $1.65 8 pack 
C0n quarts 38' each 

We carry a full line of Regular and Diet Soda 

NAME BRAND SODA AT DISCOUNT PRICES. 

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Munich — 12 01. — 4.15 case 
Balentine Ale — 12 oz. — 5.55 case 
Heineken — 12 oz. — 14.95 case 
Wurlzbuger — 12 oz. — 14.00 case 
Guiness — 12 oz. — 14.95 case 
Foster Lager beer — 25 oz. — 1 1 .85 case 
Ice (eleven pound bag) 
Charcoal — 18 lb. bag 
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I 
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I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY. JULY 23, 1975 




c 
x 
o 



by Thomas Balonek 
and 
Peter Backus 

Keen-eyed observers of the night 
sky may notice a faint object, nearly 
as large as the full moon, moving 
among the evening stars during the 
next month. The object is referred 
to by astronomers as a comet, 
meaning "hairy star". 

The comet is Kobayashi-Berger- 
Milon, named after the three 
amateur astronomers who in- 
dependently discovered it in early 
July and will be best visible during 
the next few weeks, high in the 
western sky. Comets this bright 
occur only every few years. 

Using observations of the comet 
made since its discovery, Brian 
Marsden, at the Center for 
Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., 
has been able to determine the 
comet's path and probable ap- 
pearance. The comet will be at its 
brightest this week, just barely 
visible — in a dark location — with 
the naked eye. Through binoculars, 
the best instrument with which to 
view the comet, it will appear as a 
faint, hazy patch of light about the 
size of the full moon. 

A "tail", possibly extending 
several moon diameters from the 
"head" of the comet, may form in 



August. The comet passed closest 
to the earth this past weekend, and 
is now approaching closer to the 
sun. In early September, it will 
swing around the sun and head out 
of the solar system, possibly never 
to be seen again by man. . 

A "meteor shower", nature's 
natural fireworks display, will also 
be visible between August 10 and 
15, peaking on the night of the 12- 
13. This shower, one of the most 
spectacular showers visible each 
year, is named the Perseid shower, 
named after the region of the sky 
from where the meteors appear to 
originate. It is best seen between 
midnight and dawn, in the eastern 
sky, when up to 45 meteors can be 
seen per hour under good sky 
conditions. 

Current information as to the 
position and appearance of the 
comet, and further notices about 
the meteor shower, can be ob- 
tained by calling 545-3667 during 
the day, or by checking the display 
case inside the main entrance to 
Hasbrouck Laboratory. Telescopes 
in the Amherst area may oc- 
casionally be available for public 
viewing of the comet — call the 
above number for such in- 
formation. 



Cycle 
Space 



by Paul Logue 

Motorcycles can park in the 
Campus Center Garage for a special 
rate set up by the Campus Center 
Parking office. The charge is fixed 
at five dollars per month. Don 
Witkoski, combination manager of 
the Campus Center, explained that 
the price was arrived at after some 
discussion with John Corker, 
director of the Campus Center, and 
University Ombudsman Jay 
Savereid. 

The special rate enables riders to 
unlimited use of the parking garage 
during the 30 day period. The 
special ticket can be obtained at the 
bus ticket office in the Hotel lobby. 
"This policy was instated 
because of some feedback we got 
from students last Spring. The five 
dollars per bike was arrived at 
taking in consideration that four 
bikes can fit into a space that one 
car would fill up. Since instituting 
the policy only sixteen riders have 
taken advantage of the discount 
rate. If you park by the day it will 
cost sixty cnnts a day so it really is 
worthwhile to take out the 30 day 
permit," Witkoski said. 

The parking spaces are located 
right inside the parking garage next 
to the booth which serves as a 
safeguard from theft. The 
protection from the elements is also 
a good reason to make use of the 
motorcycle space. 

The policy has met approval with 
the Board of Trustees for fiscal 76 
so that no rate hike is seen for the 
Fall semester. 

The registration of the bike and 
the type of motorcycle is the only 
thing that is registered so a friend 
riding a registered bike may also 
park in the special space. The 
Campus Center Garage is open 
from 7 a.m. until 2 a.m. during the 
Summer. 




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WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1975 

+EICBL 

continued from page 2 

play," Leaman added. "The most 
important thina is that this move 
will help us attain a greater level of 
excellence," he concluded. 

How well can we expect to do in 
this new league? The caliber of the 
teams is obviously better than what 
UMass has faced (for the most part) 
jn the YanCon. It would be too 
much to expect Minutemen 
quintets to finish on top of the final 
standings as things stand now. The 
team has won top honors seven of 
the last eight years in the Yankee 
Conference. We will no longer be 
the big frog in a little pond. 

"We'll be able to hold our own," 
said Leaman. "We won't come out 
on top, but I also don't think we'll 
be in the cellar. We'll probably 
finish between third and sixth." 

It is anticipated that officers of 
the new league will be named 
shortly and application has been 
made to the NCAA for the league 
champion to be an automatic 
qualifier to the NCAA Cham- 
pionship Basketball Tournament. 
"We'll hold a tournament at the 
end of the season, and the winner 
should, with the prestigious teams 
involved, definitely get a bid to the 
NCAA's," said Leaman. 

Present requirements call for 
league members to play a minimum 
of seven games during the 1976-77 
season and at least ten games 
against league opponents the 
following season when East and 
West divisions will be formed. All 
league members have indicated 
they will play games at the 
University's home court, Curry 
Hicks Cage, but Mclnerney stated 
that some of the Minutemen's 
league encounters would probably 
be scheduled in the Springfield 
Civic Center because of the limited 
seating capacity in the present 
campus basketball facility. 

Leaman expounded on this, "Our 
primary responsibility is to the 
students, meaning we'll play most 
of our games on campus. We also 
have a responsibility to the alumni, 
community and large bodies of 
people (Springfield) who want to 
see us and might not get a chance 
at the cage." 

It might be expected that once 
one varsity team from UMass 
makes the move, others might 
follow, especially football. 
Mclnerney doesn't see football as 
being in the same situation. 

"It's a completely different story 
there. To go even semi- big time in 
football you'd have to have a 60,000 
seat stadium for the crowds a Penn 
State might draw." 

Overall, everyone's optimistic 
about the change and Umass 
basketball's future. 

"The constituency of the 
University is very enthused and has 
been most responsive in this 
proposed change in our basketball 
program. Mclnerney stated, "And 
the geographical spectrum of the 
EICBL members will give UMass 
more visability and recognition in 
areas where many of its alumni live. 
Membership in this league coupled 
with the continuence of some of 
our long standing New England 
rivalries and games against selected 
nationally ranked schools could 
provide Massachusetts with an 
outstanding basketball schedule." 

Caustic Comment 

%** By Mike Kostek *** 

ARMAGEDDON 

(AErM SP 4513) 
time 40:66 

Sharply-formed flash craft is to 
be expected here, with this band of 
vet rocknrollers, but the easy, 
wretched excess on here is not very 
welcome. They turn four minute 
songs into eight, and thus escape 
from having to come up with an 
additional interesting four minutes 
of material while meanwhile riffing 
us into step. Old Keith Relf, late of 
Renaissance and Yardbirds, doesn't 
do much on here, and they all 
should know better. Cminus. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 




•&&* 



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cooked single brisket 

corned beef 

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Honey Glazed Ham 69* 

Imported-quarter pound 

Turkey Breast t 89' 

White Gem , sliced fresh to order. 

our salads — 



In faifn«ss to all ol our customers, we reserve th« right to limit sales lo three packages o' any item except *here otherwise 
noted Items ottered lor sale not available in case lots or toother retail dealers or wholesalers 



Our kitchen people toss 9 different garden 
salads and 4 hearty "main dish" 
salads. What a variety for summer! 

chicken 
saladTQ* 

V2 pound ■ \J 




Shrimp Salad 
Ham Salad 
Tuna Salad 



qtr 



V 2 

lb 



49* 
89* 
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—a new entree— 

stuffed 
peppers 




Bulk. Stuffing £ 
made with beef, 
bread crumbs, onion, 
tomato juice, eggs. 



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special ^f 49 

to order. «£ ^ 

A complete meal for one. Choice of Im- 
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Breast with Potato Salad, Green Olive, Roll or 
Dessert, Mustard, plastic fork, knife, napkin, 
salt and pepper. 



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the purchase of a 1 lb. container of 

Stop & Shop Kitchen 
Potato Salad or WE Cole Slaw 

233 



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Prices effective Mon., July 21 -Sat., July 26. 



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Boxes J 



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Mushrooms 

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Stems & wmx 4 oz ^M I 
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For salads or cooking 



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Shoulder 

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Beef $ 
Chuck 

for London Broil ^a»ib 

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Bottom Round or 
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(Beef Chuck) ^aVlh 

Bottom Round Steak *—* M 7 ! 
Beef Round Cube Steak M 8 ! 
Beef Eye Round Steak $ 1 9 ? 
Top Sirloin Steak « $ 2^ 

formerly called Rump Steak 

Tastes ... cooks like ground beef ... costs less! 

Ground Beef T.VB 79 

'A blend of our regular ground beef (75%)and hydrafed textured vegetable protein (25%) ^m ^a^^lto 

DaaI PlimQrC Stop * Shop- Simply Super $H 69 

Dt/t/l DUIUulO 1V; lb pkg -2 oz or 4 oz patties 



1 M lb. pkg. -2 oz. or 4 oz. patties 
Frozen 



White Gem U.S. Grade "A" Whole or Split 

Chicken Breasts f ° 9 

Our White Gem chickens are the sweetest money can buy «^^ r>. 

Thighs 



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Rolls 



99? Wings 



White 
Gem 



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12 oz $ 
pkgs 
of 8 



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rurkey, Beef or 
Chicken 



Individually Wrapped From our dairy department! 

American Slices Minute Maid 



Stop & Shop-white *V#V 
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Orange Juice 

made from concentrate 



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32 oz m 
cartons «^^ 



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Pile sugared slices on your 
breakfast cereal 



39 



10 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



In Concert: 
The Unity Enserr.ule 
July 17. S.U.B. 
By Your Secred Cowboy 

Threat of rain relocated the concert from 
Metawampe Lawn into the more cramped 
quarters of the S.U.B., which, with the 
combined heat of several hundred bodies, 
and the resulting perspiration, quickly 
became much moister than Metawampe 
could possibly have been. And unfortunately 
this excessive humidity put such a damper 
(sorry) on things that all but the most 
dedicated were driven out in search of 
something to breathe long before the 
concert's end. By and large I think they had 
the right idea anyway. The Unity Ensemble's 
material really didn't seem to merit the kind 
of concentration it took to stay in there, that 
is, in a concert situation where everyone sits 
in those numbing atrocities that pass for 
chairs. Outside, with freedom to wander 
around and focus in and out of the music, I 
think this concert could have been counted 
an enjoyable success. 

I must admit to being somewhat disap- 
pointed by The Unity Ensemble. When I hear 
a name like that I expect a group that is 
trying to blaze new trails, or at least trying to 
clear some of the newer ones. The fact that 
they have worked and studied with greats 
like Archie Shepp, Max Roach, and Marion 
Brown seemed to confirm that expectation, 
so some disappointment is understandable 
when such expectations are met with highly 
traditional 'jazz' forms, for the most part, and 
only a few attempted excursions beyond 
them into less confining areas of sound. Even 



Review 



though they played pieces by musicians who 
have been in part responsible for the 
breaking away from such limitations, such as 
Miles Davis and Sonny Rollins, they limited 
themselves to the older-style material by 
these composers. On the other hand, the 
Ensemble seems to be at a stage where, 
while they don't yet have a sound uniquely 
their own, they are capable of capturing the 
style of the musicians whose works they play 
without sounding like mere reproduction; a 
Charlie Parker piece sounds really Parker-ish, 
etc. 

Within their musical sphere, however 
lacking in variety, they are all at least 
competent and sometimes excellent. Special 
credit goes to saxophonist Hakim and bassist 
Buster Anderson for superlative soloing. 
Also worthy of special mention is trombonist 
Clifford Adams; his work on his instrument 
was always just a little short of getting the 
flow going, but he has a unique vocal style, 
sounding as if he'd taken the mellow yodel of 
Leon Thomas and turned it into an awesome, 
piercing war-cry. It's the kind of thing that 
can only be effectively used once or twice in 
a concert, as was tactfully done here, used to 
trigger off one of the more exciting 
moments, toward the conclusion, when they 
Ensemble was augmented by a flugelhorn, a 
couple of trumpets (one of which was 
electrified and had a wah-wah pedal - 
strangely out of place in such a pre-electric- 
'jazz' atmosphere) and a baritone sax for a 
short, free-blowing blast which was the high 
point of the show. 




Judy Williams of the Maria Blakey 
Dancers 

All in all, I think it could have been better, 
but the performance was not held in the 
most inspiring of environments, as I men- 
tioned before. The heat and the 
claustrophobia must be held responsible as 
the main detractors from what should have 
been more of an event than a concert, 
anyway. 



The Maria Blakey Dancers 
By Bill Hasson 

On Thursday, July 17, Miss Judy Williams, 
a member of the Maria Blakey Dance 
Troupe, held an exciting and dynamic Master 
Dance Class in the Women's North Physical 
Education Rehearsal Room, where twenty 
student dancers attended. Miss Williams, an 
accomplished choreographer and music 
historian, using the music of Harlan Leonard 
and His Rockets, paced her dancers through 
various gliding motions. One could have 
imagined themselves at a rehearsal of 
Josephine Baker's Cotton Club Dandies. In 
the evening under the most humidic con- 
ditions, the entire dance troupe put on a 
highly brilliant performance. Miss Blakey, the 
leader of the group, allowed the dancers 
plenty of space to display their individual 
creative talents. What was especially well 
received was two solo pieces by one of the 
dancers named Keith and Judy Williams. The 
show opened up with a marvelous per- 
cussion dance piece which included the 
entire dance troupe, and stimulated the 
audience in such a way one found it difficult 
to enjoy the dance itself what with the 
beautiful smiling faces of the dancers. During 
this period of fiscal austerity, it is very dif- 
ficult to keep and hold a dance troupe 
together. Therefore, Miss Blakey should be 
commended for her dedication and devotion 
to the art of dance. With the present 
repertoire that was seen at Thursday night's 
performance, I am sure that much will be 
heard from the Maria Blakey Dancers and we 
hope that she will visit the campus again real 
soon. . 



CAIVIN7& 

Northampton — }S4 2310 



AN ELECTRIFYING 
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ASIAN COMMUNITY- 
FAMILY PICNIC 

THERE WILL BE an Asian 
Community Family Picnic for Asian 
Familias Cr students on Sat. July 26. 
1 00 dusk at Mill Rivar Park. If you 
wish to coma, bring a caaaarol, 
salad or dessert. Raindata-Sunday. 
July 27. For Info., call Floronca 
Houn 263 7409 



I NEED A HOME 



24 YEAR OLD man naada a homa 
for Sapt. Rural houaa with friandly 
stabla paopla sought to share 
intaraata (radical politics. Jazz), 
work, and expenses Naat, a good 
cook, and a non-amokor. Own car. 
Call 617 621 0636 after 6 or writo 
Stava Shulman. 406 Cantra St., 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130. 



1 



HUGE WOOD DESK, 6' x 3' 

Bast of"f. 00 «°? co , nd,,,on Muat .all. 
&V :nrt.m.' ,,tC * HJ ^-^63. 

HAMMOND B-2 With Leslie 12? 
aaklng $1300. 6663423 after 6 30 
p.m. 

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car, naw radiala. 66,000 miles #760. 
263-7067. 

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miles. 26 mpg. 3 Spd. Standard only 
•1106. 283-7067. 



ROOMMATE^ WANTED" - P _ E0P _ L ?' S _ GAY ALLIANCE 



RESPONSIBLE M-F Roommata. 
Own Room In furnlahad 3 bdrm 
own houaa. Bus lino. Pool, tennis. 
air conditioned. $100 utilities in- 
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HELPVVANTED 

SPANISH ENGLISH Bilinguals 
needed for a psychology ex 
parimant. It la a 6 day axparmant 
Ian hour a day) and it paya $12. If 
intaraatad, call 646-2787. 



GENERAL SUMMER meeting 
tonlta at 7:30 p.m. Rm 811-16. 
Campus Cantar. Let's gat togathar. 

FOR RENT~ --- 

LONDON: 4 Bad room Flat to rant 
Month of August. Gardan, patio. 60 
pounda a waak Call 208-4263. 

4 BEDROOM 2 bath aublat till 
Auguat 31 $200. Laaaa option In 
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263-2433. 



ROOM WANTED 



69 RAMBLER REBEL, 6 cyl. 26 
mpg, automatic, excellent con- 
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studant or working about 80. Call 
667-0146. Aak for John. 



INSTRUCTIONS 



WANTED 



68 PEUGOT 403, Sunroof, needs 
Battery. $100 and drive It away Bob 
763-7067. 

BISEXUAL WOMEN'S 
RAP GROUP 



MEETS FOR INFORMAL rap 
every Mon, nlta at 7:30 In the 
Campos Center. See room Hating 
near the elevatora for exact 
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PEOPLE INTERESTED In working 
on back to achool issue of 
Collegian. Artists. Photographers, 
writera and layout people are 
needed - No experience neceaaary, 
just time and energy. See B.J. In 
Collegian office afternoona. 

MOTORCYCLE 



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in people to play recorder, herpa £t 
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services" 

PUBLISHING SERVICE "will 
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groupa ahould prep are now for fall 
Semeatar. We do newapapera, 
newalettera, pamphl'eta 
magazines, brochurea, you name H 
The Mesaage Company of 
Amheret. P.O. Box 346, Amharat 
01002 or Call Jerry at 263-1 



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5000 Ml. Call Jeff 6-2733 or 646-0216. 



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RIGHT. Any meka, yr., modal. No 
Job to small. 263-7087. 



WED NESDAY, JULY 23. 1975 

THE WIZARD OF ID 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



11 



by Brant parkrr and Johnny hart 








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by johnny hart 




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Bits and Pieces 

AID "So far, about 50 area stores 

have indicated they will submit 

tO sD6 coupons - offering sizeable 

-r-» i discounts — to be included in the 

On V pocket-sized publication,"* he 

added. 

Some 30,000 copies of the 
Discount Guide will be distributed 
free to all students in the five- 
college area, during the first two 
weeks of September. 

Lazar noted that the deadline for 
accepting coupons for the Discount 
Guide is August 1, and anyone 
interested in submitting a coupon 
should contact him before then, at 
253-9869, or by writing P.O. Box 
210, Amherst, 01002. 

The Message Company of 
Amherst, in its second year of 
operation, is an editorial consulting 
and creative design service which 
has produced such publications as 
NU, The Five College Jewish 
Monthly, and UMass Rowing 
News. 



AMHERST - David Joyce, 
staunch critic of the Warren 
Commission that investigated the 
1963 assassination of President 
John F. Kennedy, will appear on 
Channel 40's Conversations With 
program Sunday, July 27. The 
show, hosted by Frank Mclnerney, 
is on at 1:00 p.m. 

Joyce will show the Zapruder 
film (rarely-seen color film of the 
actual murder) and will also present 
some thirty slides as proof, he 
contends, "that Lee Harvey Oswald 
did not act alone in shooting the 
President, if he acted at all." 

The Western Massachusetts 
Assassination Information Bureau 
is an Amherst group founded by 
Joyce to publicise the evidence and 
to work to get Congress to reopen 
the case. Their "Who Killed JFK?" 
lecture-slide presentation on July 1 
filled the Student Union Ballroom 
at UMass, drawing more than 800 
people. The group has been on 
several area radio talk shows, and 
will appear on the September 4 
Kitty Today show on Channel 22. 
They plan to begin giving the "Who 
Killed JFK?" presentation in 
schools and clubs in the area 
beginning in September. Interested 
sponsors should contact the group 
(a non-profit organization) at Box 
657, Amherst, Mass. 01002, or by 
calling 549-1511 or 253-9517. 

Made in China 

A sense of social purpose in 
production, rather than a western 
concern for individual gain, 
dominates the thinking of Chinese 
factory workers, Carl Crook, a 
UMass student with experience in 
Chinese and English factories, 
reported Wednesday evening to an 
audience at the university. 

The meeting was one of a series 
sponsored by the U.S. -China 
People's Friendship Association 
and the Asian studies department 
It will be followed tonight (also 8 
p.m. in Room 102, Thompson Hall) 
by a report on a westerner's 
reaction to life on Chinese com- 
munes by another UMass student, 
Ms. Marni Rosner. 

Crook, who had spent four years 
in Chinese farm tool and 
automotive factories, said the 
sharpest contrast he felt in his later 
jobs in English factories was the 
alienation of the western workers 
from the aims of production. 

"The Chinese workers had a 
deep concern for the quality of their 
product," Crook found, "but 
English workers beside me on the 
line didn't know or care what was 
the purpose of the machine 
component they were producing. 

"The English had a strong sense 
of being in a working class, but the 
Chinese had a community spirit — 
a concern for a participation in 
decisions affecting the success of 
the factory and the lives of their 
fellow workers." 

This is the consequence, he said, 
of government policy that opposes 
material incentives and seeks to 
have people motivated by social 
concern. 

Price Slasher 
Continues 

Plans for publishing a back-to- 
campus Discount Guide are "well 
underway," according to Jerald H. 
Lazar, president of The Message 
Company of Amherst, which is 
compiling the booklet. 

"We are in the process of ap- 
proaching all local businesses 
which students patronize — 
restaurants, clothing shops, stereo 
houses, theaters — and the 
response from the merchants has 
been exceptionally good," Lazar 
said. 




Sex and Drugs 

Does Marujuana and sex mix? 

According to a recent Associated 
Press release, the department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare has 
granted $61 ,500 to Southern Illinois 
University to find out. 

Between 60 and 100 local adult 
male volunteers, who will be paid 
about $10 a session, will be given 
marijuana and shown erotic films 
while an electronic device, attached 
to their sexual organs, will deter- 
mine the amount of sexual 
response. 

According to Dr. Harris Rubin, 
the psychologist in charge of the 
project, the marijuana, which will 
be supplied by the federal 
government to "assure uniform 
quality," will be burned and the 
smoke fed into a spirometer, a 
device which will allow researchers 
to control the dose, and then 
inhaled by the volunteers through a 
face mask. 

"It's a very controlled 
procedure," Rubin said according 
to the report. "The administration 
of marijuana is done under the 
direct supervision of a physician." 

The project is, for the time being, 
strictly for men only. "It's much 
more difficult to measure the sexual 
arousal of a female," Rubin said. 

The AP report dosn't say who 
will supply the X-rated flics. 

Rockets Red 
Glare 

The precision, glitter and thud of 
five of the nation's most 
magnificent drum and bugle corps 
will etch a monument to dedication 
Saturday, Aug. 23, at the University 
of Massachusetts Alumni Stadium 
in Amherst. 

The five will be brought together 
in the fourth annual Super Bowl of 
Music sponsored by the 
Belchertown State School Firends 
Association. The association has 
been committed to the im- 
provement and humanization of the 
quality of lives of the mentally 
retarded at the school. 

Beginning at 7:30 p.m. the 
competing senior corps will vie for 
judge's honors and cash prizes. The 
show will open with pageantry in 
recognition of the nation's 
Bicentennial. It will close with a 
special presentation by 

Springfield's St. George Olym- 
pians, the host corps. 



12 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1975 



■Campus Comments 



The Assassination Information Bureau, a Cambridge based 
organization with a chapter located in Amherst, is attempting to 
reopen the investigation of J n F. Kennedy's assassination on the 
premise that Lee Harvey Os.v aid did not act alone. 

Question: Do you feei that the assassination should be rein- 
vestigated? And what is your opinion of the theory that JFK's 
assassination was the outcome of a conspiracy, rather than the act 
of a lone assassin? 



Mark Wojcik, teacher cer- 
tification- candidate 

"I don't think that Kennedy's 
assassination was a conspiracy. 
I just don't think that the CIA or 
anyone else would hire 
someone to kill the president, I 
just can't believe that. From 
what I've read about it, and 
from the reports I've seen, I 
don't see enough evidence to 
say that more than one person 
was involved in it. I can't agree 
with the A.I.B.'s efforts to bring 
more evidence to light. 





Connie Venturini, class of 76 
"I haven't seen the Zapruder 
film, but I've read about it. I 
think that the Assassination 
Information Bureau has a lot 
going for it. I can see positive 
evidence for both sides of the 
lone vs. conspiracy theories of 
Kennedy's assassination, but I 
don't feel I've looked into the 
matter hard enough to for- 
mulate an opinion either way." 



Dan OiLella, graduate student 
"I think it's a good idea to 
investigate, but even if the 
A.I.B. finds some new 
evidence, it's unlikely that 
-anything will ever be done 
about it There are so many 
things that are pushed under 
the table. This will probably all 
come out in forty years, it'll be 
'safe'. That's the way history 
works. . . you never know what 
really happened until years 
afterwards." 





Linda Chasey, UMass graduate 
"I definitely agree that 
Kennedy's assassination should 
be re- investigated. It seems to 
me that it would be pretty 
difficult for one person to have 
done it. I don't agree with the 
Warren Commission report. 
The people who were on the 
Warren Commission probably 
should have been investigated 
themselves." 



Steve Turner, graduate student 
"I'd believe almost anything, 
and I wouldn't put it past them, 
any government. I'm not saying 
that our government definitely 
assassinated Kennedy, but 
these days I'd believe anything. 
Why not?" 




Comments 




Jaws, laws and flaws 



(DPIMGN 



by Zamir Nestelbaum 

Sharks! Finsl Jaws! fish Storiesl 
It was a usual hot sultry day, 
predicted on the principle that all 
men (and women and children and 
anything) should be equally humid. 
And so sure enough there was a 
decent size crowd gathered at 
Puffers Pond, enjoying the usual 
fare of swimming, splashing, 
cliffdiving, picnicing, and of course 
tarzaning into the water on a rope 
attached to a well placed tree. It 
seemed that little could disrupt this 
idyllic scene. 

But who knows what evil lurks in 
the hearts of men? For suddenly, in 
the middle of Puffers Pond, there 
emerged a large dorsal fin out of 
the water, about four feet high and 
properly serated along its posterior 
edge. Quickly there emerged a 
tremendous hue and cry as the 
multitude screamed Shark! Shark! 
SHARK! There was a mad 
scramble for the safety of the 
shore, everyone churning and 
kicking to escape the fast ap- 
proaching fin. One lad, in the 
middle of a cliff dive, stopped 
halfway down the thirty foot drop, 
and managed to retrace his route 
back tnrough the air to the top. 
Those at shore immediately began 



to pelt the Great Fin with assorted 
missiles, all in a general effort to 
pound the shit out of the thing. 
Many, having just seen lurid epics 
of viscious sharks in the cinema or 
having read of them in the popular 
print, quickly became delirious. But 
they were not without a plan of 
action. The cry went up to fetch a 
large boat so that several of the 
sturdiest could go out and harpoon 
the Great Fin. 

Well before long, a well endowed 
neighbor lent her craft to the effort. 
And alas, though the Great Fin was 
large^and menacing it could not 
outrace the fleet vessel in the small 
confines of old Puffers. The Great 
Fin was soon overtaken and 
caputured with several harpoons 
strategically placed through it. And 
then those on board the craft 
slowly began the perilous effort to 
reel the Wounded Fin into shore. 

You can just imagine the shock 
waves that went screaming 
through the (by now) large crowd 
that had assembled around the 
perimeter of the pond, when the 
Great Fin proved not to be a shark, 
but indeed a man, equipped with 
mask and snorkel, and of course a 
large dorsal fin strapped cleverly to 
his midsection. And you can further 
imagine the tremors of anger and 
bewilderment that were felt by the 



throng when the man turned out to 
be none other than Governor 
Michael Dukakis! 

The Crowd quickly surrounded 
the Governor when the vessel was 
beached, and angrily demanded an 
explanation as to why their 
Governor had disrupted their 
pleasure! 

He replied that he was merely 
doing his Jacques Cousteau 
imitation. With this the multitude 
became increasingly hostile. A few 
made efforts to jostle His Ex- 
cellency, prompting him to assert 
forcefully that he was only out 
taking a poll to find out how his 
underwater constituents felt about 
the tax deficit. And when it became 
plain that this too would not do 
with the mob, the Governor merely 
maintained that he was only out for 
a leisurely, if somewhat un- 
conventional swim. 

Some of the crowd wanted to 
dice the Governor up and can him, 
similar to the treatment given other 
ordinary fish. But since he was too 
big a fish, in too small a pond, this 
plan was discarded. Most of the 
mob, though, felt that the Governor 
was really trying to catch his supper 
at Amherst's expense, since he 
had, by this time, become quite 
accustomed to devouring UMass 
and picking its bones clean. 



Tyla L. Michelove 



There lies within our 
generation a major fault that 
has been handed down from 
father to son, mother to 
daughter in the Great American 
Tradition. It seems that in our 
rush to become a sophisticated 
people we have had to sacrifice 
all human trust. Whatever the 
reason, the trust is simply not 
there. 

(This, of course, is an over 
simplification, but for the 
examples I wish to bring up it 
will be a satisfactory definition.) 

We do not trust our 
government, and with good 
reason. They have betrayed us 
to the point that no trust could 



be built up again given the 
people in power. We don't trust 
our parents, because they let 
things slip out of their hands 
and out of control. All this is a 
healthy distrust for growing 
minds, the learning class as: it 
were. However, the sickness 
that wifl destroy any hope this 
generation has to repair this 
country is the distrust of our 
fellows. 

Certainly I cio not expect over 
a. million people to agree with 
each other. I don't expect three 
people in any situation to do so. 
However, we should not attack 
each other. What ever hap- 
pened to the "well, that's your 
thing" attitude that is supposed 
to encapsulate this apathetic 
generation? Why must we 



Resource or recourse 



fragment and then verbally 
abuse those who are at- 
tempting to step out of the 
mold and do something? 

What I am referring to, 
basically, here on campus, is 
the media and private verbal 
abuse the Student Action 
Committee faced only two 
months ago from other 
students who were doing 
nothing about the budget cuts. 
I'm talking about a certain 
reporter publicly attacking the 
Assassination Information 
Bureau before all his facts were 
in. (Granted there are questions 
that even I feel need to be 
answered, but they do not 



effect the intent of the 
organization and do not 
discount its results.) Our lack of 
support for the S.C.A. helped 
to render it ineffective more 
than anything Whitmore did or 
didn't do, and it goes on. Blind 
attacks against ourselves does 
nothing but lessen the already 
low image this country has of 
us and the even lower image we 
have of ourselves. 

When it comes to any 
student activity, I believe we 
should support it, or let it pass 
and deal with more obviously 
detrimental things, like the 
administration at Whitmore, 
Dukakis' betrayal of the 
working and lower middle 



classes, the welfare problem in 
Massachusetts, the F.B.I, 
attacks on women across the 
country, the infringements of all 
our rights from any outside 
group. 

We are here to grow and 
learn, primarily. This should not 
be a training ground to close 
our minds. It is imperative to 
the well being of our generation 
that we support each other's 
constructive activities now! 
How else will we able to create 
a government for the people, by 
the people, when it comes our 
time? No one else can teach us; 
no one else can make our 
decisions for us; no one else is 
willing to support us. We are all 
we have, so let us use our 
resources, not abuse them. 



Patriots at UMass 



Neil Graff: the man 
behind the man behind 



o 



the man 



see page 7 



It didn't take long for Stove Schubert, the only UMass player 
on the Patriots' squad, to gat a muscle pull. The wide receiver 
was not seriously injured, head coach Chuck Fairbanks said. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



TELEPHONE 545 1982 
BUSINESS 5450617 



VOLUME I, ISSUE VI 



AMHERST, MA. 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, W5 



Union of Student 
Employees 

ine fate of the Union of Student 
Employees (USE) is still up in the air. 
John Corker, director ot the Campus 
Center, has speculated that if the USE is 
recognized, then a "campus wide" union 
would probably follow. If UMass gets a 
union, he believes it could set a precedent 
for other student labors. See page 2. 

CCATV 

Support for the Center for Community 
Access Television (CCATV) in Amherst is 
growing fast. Presently, public access 
programs are aired on Channel 8, and 
David Skillicorn, CCATV coordinator, is 
compiling a schedule ot member 
programs that include a presentation by 
the Western Mass. Assassination Infor- 
mation Bureau. See page 4. 

Springsteen, Baez 
Preservation Hall 
in review 

see pages 12, 13 



t2 



th 



y*z+ 



Here's your budget 
check for tfiis month, 
Mr. Wood. 



C 



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> CDuTSsenof 

i Someone t\se 
\torfothis! 



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UMass Budget 

A bleak forecast 
for the fiscal future 

see page 3 



^.51 Uf>« 1* 



TflE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIA N 

Campus 



Wednesday, July 30, lf7$ 



Wednesday, July 30, 1*75 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEOIAN 



USE: Collective 
Bargaining? 



By Fred Nobles 

After three days of formal hearings during 
the past five weeks, the fate of the Union of 
Student Employees (USE) is still in question. 
Michael Bardsley, chairperson of the USE, 
anticipates only one more day of hearings 
will be needed for the Massachusetts Labor 
Relations Commission to collect all in- 
formation on the USE petition to engage in 
legal collective bargaining. 

Following the final hearing, which has not 
yet been set, there will be a waiting period of 
several weeks to several months before the 
Labor Relations Commission hands down a 
decision. 

Bardsley, meanwhile, is confident that the 
USE will win its case. 

Commenting on the recent hearings, 
Bardsley said that although "the University 
effectively dragged out the hearings for two 
months," the USE is, "convinced that the 
University cannot win legaKy." 

What began last February when one 
hundred Campus Center student employees 
held a convention to establish a union of 
student and hourly employees in the Campus 



Center, may turn into a precident setting 
case for Massachusetts labor. If the USE 
wins its case, it will be the first union in the 
state representing student workers. 

John Corker, director of the Campus 
Center, has speculated that if the USE is 
recognized, then a "campus wide" union 
would probably follow. Once UMass 
Amherst has a union, Corker believes any 
student employee in the state could soon be 
represented by a labor union. 

The three days of formal hearings that 
have taken place to date have dealt with 
what Corker characterized as "difficult 
problems." 

On June 23, the first day of hearings, a 
University attorney submitted a motion 
containing seven reasons why the USE 
petition should be dismissed. According to 
Bardsley, much of the discussion during the 
hearings has revolved around the University 
motion. 

Among the reasons given for dismissal of 
the hearings were: USE members are not 
"public employees," a student employee 




"The USE is convinced 
that the University 
cannot win legally. 



n 



union should represent the entire campus 
and not just the Campus Center, and the 
"organizational effort has been tainted by 
managerial interference." 

In a recent interview, Bardsley responded 
to each of the University charges. 

According to Bardsley, the charge that 



-Michael Bardsley 



students are not "public employees" is not 
legally correct. Bardsley said that the UMass 
attorney has reasoned the since students are 
not specifically mentioned in the 
Massachusetts public employee collective 
bargaining laws, they can't form a bargaining 
unit. 

Bardsley points out that Massachusetts 
General Laws dealing with the UMass Board 
of Trustees and their "designated 
representatives" defines who is not a public 
employee of the University. It is the USE's 
contention that since they are not specifically 
excluded by that law, they must be con- 
sidered "public employees." 

Bardsley and the USE also disagree with 
the University claim that a student employee 
bargaining unit must be campus wide. 
According to Bardsley, UMass attorneys 
have argued that the Financial Aid Office is 
central employer for student workers and, 
therefore, all student employees should be 
included in any union. 

continued on page 15 



Student Senate Executive Committee votes 

LSO Allocated $3,800 



By Dan LaBonte 

The Student Senate Executive 
Committee, empowered to act in 
behalf of the Student Senate 
during the summer months, voted 
to conditionally allocate at least 
$3,800 to the student Legal Service 
Office (LSO) in order to renovate 
their Campus Center office and buy 
additional office equipment and 
library materials. 

In three separate motions coming 
from Exec. Comm. member 
MaryEllen Blazon, the Comm. 
voted overwhelmingly at their 
Sunday meeting to: 

— appropriate $2,152, or two- 
thirds of the total cost, whichever is 
less, for the purpose of office 
renovation in LSO room 825, 
contingent upon the Senate- 
Treasurer and the Director of LSO 
securing a commitment for CC 
space and investigating a possible 
cost reduction. 

— to appropriate $1,333 or two- 
thirds of the total cost, whichever is 
less, for the purpose of purchasing 
additions for the library, contingent 
upon an affirmatively definitive 
resolution of whether or not LSO 



can defend clients in criminal 
matters. 

— to appropriate $333 for the 
purpose of purchasing two dic- 
tation units and a transcription unit, 
contingent upon whether or not the 
treasurer finds the units that were 
originally purchased by the Senate 
two years ago. 

In a memo sent to Exec. Comm. 
members, Chairperson of the Legal 
Service Bond Michael Parkhurst 
said the reasons for the additional 
funding request were, "to repar- 
tition the office to provide privacy 
for clients, obtain dictation 
equipment to allow the staff to 
function more efficiently, and to 
acquire a criminal library in an- 
ticipation of the office initiating this 
type of service." 

In an unanimous decision, the 
Comm. also voted to support Dr. 
Helen Hill in her challenge to Vice 
Chancellor of Student Affairs Dr. 
Robert Gage's termination of 
Commuter Affairs Office and her 
position as its director. 

In a related matter, the Comm. 
moved to postpone, until the* next 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



EDITORS 

BUSINESS MANAGED 

ADVERTISING 



Dan LaBonte, Debbie Schafer 

Ken Shapiro 

Alan Anastos, Peter Birnbaum 



CONTRIBUTORS Fred Nobles, Richard Wright, Joe Mahoney, Walter 
Mitus, John McHalt, Mike Kneeland, Mike Kostek, Tyla Michelove, 
Andy McKemie, Bill Hatson, Rob Melacata, B J Roche, Mike Fay, Kris 
Jackson, Mike Moyle, George Withers, Ed McCarthy, Stuart Cudlitz, 
Dave Sokol, Cindy Toomey, 

Summer newspaper ot the University of Massachusetts. The staff is 

responsible for its content and no faculty member or administrator 

reads it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. Unsigned 

editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not necessarily 

eflect the views of the student body, faculty, or administration. Signed 

ditorials, columns, reviews, cartoons, and letters represent the per 

jnal views of the authors. 

The office of the Massachusetts Summer Collegian is on the second 
floor of the Student Union on the campus of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 01002, telephone: S45 1982. 



Exec. Comm. meeting, a motion to 
call for the immediate resignation of 
Vice Chancellor Gage. 

Also at the meeting, Student 
Government Association President 
John O'Keefe presented a letter 
concerning a meeting of all state 
schools and public institutions of 
higher education to be held on the 
UMass campus Aug. 9. 

The meeting will be the first of a 
series of conferences of a voluntary 
association of students. 

Primarily an organizational 
meeting, students at the con- 
ference will outline strategies and 
contingency plans with respect to 
all issues of state economics "by 
which we feel all student rights 
have been co-opted or curtailed, 
specifically with regards to 
governence procedures in this 
state," according to Dorothy 
Muller, staff asst. to the SGA 
president. 

In reference to the Committee's 
establishing the Summer 
Organizing Project last meeting, 
SOP Director John Fisher sent a 
memo to the Comm. outlining 
'operational guidelines for the 
remainder of the summer. 

"For obvious reasons we must 
spend the summer working in 
specific problem areas, which can 
include planning for the fall. We 
have a lot to do, and I intend to do 
everything I possibly can to see that 
we do it," Fisher said in the memo. 

Hiring for Summer Organizing 
Project members has also neared 
completion, with 11 of the 
proposed 12 students hired. The 
twelfth member will be sought form 
Third World. 



Members of the Summer Project 
Research group are Ellen Gavin, 
Peter Knowton, Kathy Bachelder, 
and David O'Connell. Mitchell Riese 
and Elissa Goldman are on the 
Economic group, with Robert 
Heywood. Ellen Carriccolo, Ken 
Creighton, Annette Guttenburg, 
and John Pepi on the Organizing 
group. 

After hearing presentations from 
David Skillicorn, newly elected 
Coordinator for the Center for 
Community Access Television at 
Amherst (CCATV), and Prescott 
Smith, the Comm. voted 
unanimously to appropriate $250 
for CCATV. further, that the 
Center present a complete proposal 
and budget request to the Exec. 
Comm. by Sept. 10, 1975. It was 
ammended that passage of this 
motion should in no way be con- 
strued as a pledge for future 
financial support from the Senate. 

In other action, the Exec. Comm. 
voted: 

— that the Student Senate 
encumber $8,000 for publication of 
the Course Description Guide for 
fall 75 and spring 76 semesters. 

— to set the Student Activities 
Tax Fund (SATF) at a figure of no 
more than $55 per student. 

— to authorize certain category 
changes in the Credit Union 
Association concerning printing, 
postage, telephone, duplicating, 
and office supply costs, totalling 
$285. 

— that the Student Senate Exec. 
Comm. support a petition to call 
for the reduction of monies to 
Richard Nixon to a level equal to a 
normal retirement grant. 



Conference in Wash., D.C. 

— to defeat a motion to allocate 
$200 to the UMass Tenants Assoc. 
Day Care Camp. 

— to postpone a motion to 
establish a permanent committee 
whose function will be to put 
UMass on the major concert circuit 
so as to raise funds in this period of 
economic depression. 

Also, a letter from Student 
Senate Chairperson Jon Hite to all 
UMass students urging them to call 
or write their various represen- 
tatives in Boston concerning the 
imminent budget cuts effecting 
UMass has been completed and is 
in the mailing process. 



- to instruct the Senate 
Treasurer, Jack Margossian, that 
no Senate money is to be spent for 
the purpose of attending the 
National Student Association 

5P 




$20 



worth of bicycle 



with the purchase 
»\*RALEi<ZH 

RECORD or 
GRAND PRIX 




Select from 

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Umass Budget 




The Meat Cleaver Mania 



By Richard Wright 



Despite the absense ot specific directives 
from officials responsible for the UMass 
budget, already many department heads, 
faculty, and students are scrambling to 
prepare for the impending money crunch 
here. As early as last Spring University 
administrators held discussions with heads 
of Mi,jor Budgetary Units to consider initial 
plans for adjusting to anticipated budget 
cuts, according to officials here. 

Presently an interim 45 day budget set at 
90 per cent of last year's figure, along with a 
hiring freeze invoked by UMass President 
Robert C. Wood has meant real hardship for 
certain departments already according to 
University spokespersons. 

Warren W. Gulko, budget director here, 
reportedly has said he expected reductions in 
the budget would require a continuation of 
the freeze on hiring, and threaten a number 
of student services. 

"Budget cuts of this magnitude threaten 
the viability of the university and undermine 
the excellence of the programs we offer...", 
said Gulko. 

Acting Associate Provost John A. Hunt 
revealed in a Collegian interview at least four 
special programs under his department are in 
serious trouble as a result of the freeze and 
the limited interim budget over the summer. 
"We have to have some relief in order for 
some programs to run at all," said Hunt. 

Hunt said among the most seriously af- 
flicted programs are Outreach, BDIC, Project 
10, and Global Survival. Hunt said without 
relief from the freeze "We'll have to start 
collapsing programs". He added by 
collapsing programs he means they "will 
operate, but on a very restricted basis". 

As a result of the hiring freeze by Wood 
some faculty have said untenured professors 
face a job security situation more tenuous 
than ever. Associate Professor Larry S. 
Roberts, secretary of the Massachusetts 
Society of Professors said the freeze has had 
an "unfortunate affect on morale" among 
untenured faculty. 

Roberts said, "From the students point of 
view this is of grave importance". Roberts 
said the possibility of teacher performance 
being affected is very real. 

As for the budget situation Roberts said 
his department as yet can not purchase 
mimeograph paper to make up even a class 
sylabus. Lab supplies have to be ordered 
right away for next Fall said Roberts. "How 
can I obtain the biological specimens I need 
to run labs in my course?" asked Roberts. 
According to Roberts as the student to 
faculty ratio climbs it is possible"... certain 
courses won't be given because no one will 
be able to teach them". Roberts said the 
lateness in being able to offer Assistantships 
has meant students took opportunities 
elsewhere. "This hurts our graduate 
program", said Roberts. 

Hunt said "There appears to be this myth 
that there is no relationship between the 
graduate and undergraduate programs. It is 
the interaction between these two levels that 
makes the quality of the University and 



anybody who thinks differently is crazy". 

Hunt said in Special Programs he relies on 
having graduate assistantships to trade to 
departments for faculty time,". ..which is 
healthy for everyone". According to Hunt 
and Roberts the crisis has evolved around 
the inability of programs to set up for the Fall 
if offers for Assistantships were not made 
prior to the freeze by Wood. 

Hunt said the Southwest Residential 
program did not allocate positions before the 
freeze. Hunt said he had to reduce them by 
two positions. "That will have an effect on 
their program. It is set, it will run, but 
everytime you get into cutting people you 



on the number of commitments made by 
departments to graduate students for 
assistantships, but "We have commitments 
to the undergraduates who have registered 
for courses — we must get them TA's no 
matter what we have to do", said Chappell. 

Chappell said "The graduate and un- 
dergraduate programs are tied together in a 
lot of ways". He said it is a short-sighted 
argument on the part of those who believe 
the University should not be as com- 
plimentary graduate and undergraduate 
programs. 

"If the Legislature decides to have a 
glorified teaching college, it would be a 




Without relief from the freeze, we'll have to start 
collapsing program s...that is, they will operate, 
but on a very restricted basis." -John A. Hunt 



reduce their magnitude and the quality," said 
Hunt. 

Vere C. Chappell, acting associate provost 
and dean of the graduate school said in a 
Collegian telephone interview most graduate 
assistantships had been commited prior to 
the freeze. Last year 450 assistantships and 
850 teaching associates provided classroom 
instruction for UMass undergraduates. 

"I would guess most of those positions 
have already been taken care of", said 
Chappell. "But I'm sure that two or three 
hundred students have been caught in the 
middle", he added. Those positions not 
commited before the freeze are the ones in 
the "middle". 

"We haven't any idea of the number of 
commitments made. We are just collecting 
information now", said Chappell. 

Chappell said he might be over optimistic 



disaster", said Chappell. Chappell said the 
University is a research institution as well as 
a teaching institution. He said if you cut back 
too much you run the risk of losing the best 
faculty who provide the leadership the 
University needs. 

Gulko said "These cutbacks come at a 
time very crucial to the Amherst campus, 
because it is just now emerging as a major 
public university. Over the years, we have 
built up an excellent faculty, a major com- 
munity of scholars' whose activities benefit 
not only the students but the Com- 
monwealth as well by adding to the pool of 
scientific knowledge and contributing 
significantly to the solutions to many of the 
state's problems." 

Hunt said when budget cuts were 
discussed last Spring he began making cuts 
in the administration of Special Programs. "I 



cut things up here and left programs as they 
were", said Hunt. But if the final budget 
figure is the $64.3 million Governor Michael 
Dukakis has set "Then the University can't 
get by without firing people", said Hunt. 

Chappell said "You can't cut overnight. 
You need a year and a half notice," to plan 
properly he added. "Some faculty have 
tenure and others have multiple year con- 
tracts", said Chappell. "If you're talking 
about saving money for September you can't 
do it by firing people" he added. 

Chappell said "There is some talk of 
breaking tenure, but I don't belifive the 
University has any serious intention of firing 
people", Chappell said a freeze is a 
"haphazard way to cut, but has the affect of 
saving money". He said instead of careful 
planning and analysis a freeze just has the 
affect of cutting costs through personnel 
attrition. 

According to University spokespersons 
the necessity of a second 45 day interim 
budget from August 15 to October 1 seems 
certain. Hunt said he feels a second interim 
budget will be necessary but, "There is no 
certainty that it won't stay at the 90 per cent 
of one- twelfth level. If so we will have to 
make all the frantic adjustments we can 
make. It can reliably be predicted it will be a 
mess", he added. 

Hunt said, "There is no assurance that we 
won't have to release some people, court 
cases a 

"Therf . .. . . Plough lawyers in the state 
to handle the number of court cases if they 
try to fire all these people," said Hunt. 

Hunt said a $66 million budget would be 
hard to work with but would not damage the 
University in the way the $64.3 million 
recommendation by Dukakis would. 

Chappell said another way to save money 
is "to put faculty on leave without pay for a 
week— then you can save a million dollars." 
Chappell said along with faculty furloughs 
some buildings could be closed and as a last 
resort cutbacks in the number of classes and 
admissions for next Spring could reduce 
costs. "I feel a cutback in academic 
programs would be the last thing to be 
considered," said Chappell. 

"We're really in a situation of ignorance— 
the situation has never been like this before", 
said Chappell. "We're really just waiting- 
and when we get the final budget figure we'll 
do what we can", he added. 

Hunt said he was disappointed about the 
quality of the discussion going on and the 
quality of the analysis on how the austerity 
measures are to be achieved. 

"The issue is the nature of the forum 
whereby the reductions will be discussed 
openly and honestly", said Hunt. 

Officially, nothing specific has been 
handed down to department heads con- 
cerning what to expect in the form of a 
budget allocation said Hunt. "Until you know 
what your final budget is you can't plan and 
that is damaging", said Hunt. "You need to 
know a year ahead what you've got in order 

continued on page 14 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



CCATV 
Amherst may have access 



By Joe Mahoney 

Amherst residents may soon find 
that they have more control over 
their television sets thi n st he 
volume level ? n, 1 channel seiec" 

Under Federal <~~ r nmun : catio n,! 
Commission (FCC) regulata ■■» the 
present cable operator lice' ^-e, 
Pioneer Valley Cablevision, must 
allocate one of the 12 channels to 
"public ^ccess" cablecasting if and 
when their license (expiring nev< 
June) is renewed. The public ac- 
cess channel the medium for 
community groups and individuals 
to present their ideas, theii ac- 
tivities, their plans. 

And, according to th. .CC, the 
public access chan. ■ .M be 
provided "on a first come, non- 
discriminatory basis" free of charge 
for anyone who ras something to 
say. 

The Center for Community 
Access Television (CCATV) at 
Amhergt is an independent 
community group that organized 
last February around the need for a 
viable public a cess channel. Along 
with maki'-c available video 
equipment a . . facilities, CCATV 
offers instruc t; on to the general 
public on how to create and 
cablecast programs. 

The group has tanen an active 
role in working with the Amherst 
Board af Selectmen on the various 
propor*'* submitted for , >6 . «el 
allocations. CCA i V has also niade 
recommendations to the selectmen 




Wednesday, July 30, 197s 



Wednesday, July 30, 1?7S 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMME R COLLEGIA N 

■ — — — —— 1 — — — — i^— — 



on the dimensions, location and 
extent of video equipment 
necessary to operate the envisioned 
storefront studio. 

Support for the access channel is 
growing. At the Amherst Board of 
Selectmen meeting Monday night, 
Chairperson Nancy Eddy told newly 
elected CCATV president Ann 
Emery that the board is "firmly 
committed" to public access. Eddy 
"then stated that the access channel 
should be put on the VHF dial 
(making it available with no need of 
renting a converter.) 

Presently, public access 
programs are aired on Channel 8, 
the educational access station in 



Amherst. CCATV coordinator 
David Skillicorn is compiling a 
schedule of member programs for 
the channel. Upcoming programs 
that are now in the works, ac- 
cording to Skillicorn, include a tape 
of the Arts and Crafts Festival on 
the town common (to be held Aug. 
16) and a presentation by the 
Western Mass. Assassination 
Information Bureau. 

Membership in CCATV is free 
and open. Workshop meetings are 
held monthly during the summer. 
Watch for notices in the Collegian 
for times and dates. (To contact 
CCATV write P.O. Box 138, 
Amherst, Ma. 01002.) 



Morrill Science Greenhouse 

Environments range from o country farm 
ail the way up to the arctic 



By Walter Mitus 

In the $250,000 everlite 
greenhouses of Morrill Science 
Center grows a diverse assortment 
of plant life and, according to 
greenhouse director Ronald Beck- 
with, "Everything here has a 
purpose." 

Beckwith explained that the 
greenhouses were built in 1973 
solely for reswarch and teaching. He 
stresses that the plants are not to 
look pretty and they are not for 
show. 

One botany class, for inste r 
studying "economic plants, r*jt 
them, the greenhouse is filled with 
wheat, corn, soybean, rubber, yam, 
rice and vanilla. Students from this 
class will be on their way to 
discovering methods of obtaining 
more productive crops to feed the 
world's increasing number of 
hungry inhabitants. 

According to Beckwith, a lot of 
work on genetics is done here. 
Edward Klekowski received a 
$75,000 grant from the National 
Science Foundation and the Office 
of Water Research and Technology 
to study the effects of river 
pollution on the breakdown of 
chromosomes. "In 1974. we found 
evidence that chromosomes were 
indeed being broken down. Now 
we are trying to pin down the exact 
source of this breakdown," 
Klekowski said. After excavating 
the plants along the river, he brings 
them to the greenhouse for study. 

The greenhouse contains seven 
environmental chambers, one of 
which stimulates the artic. Paul 
Barrett uses this to study the effect 
that the Alaskian pipeline may have 
on the plant life of the tundra. 

During my last visit to the 
greenhouse, Beefcwith was sowing 
silk tree seeds for a November 
botany class. The native American 
Albizzia Julibrissin (alais silk tree) is 
a light sensitive tree whose leaves 
shut at night and reopen in the 
icrning. 'That's fine for a nine 




One of the many experimental gardens at the Morrill 
Greenhouse. 



o'clock class, but this process must 
occur for study during a 1:25 class. 
This is where we come in by 
alternating the time cycle so the 
tree's day begins at one o'clock in 
the afternoon," Beckwith said. 

At the greenhouse, there are 72 
new experiments tunning so far this 
year with others continuing from 



past years. It is not your ordinary 
type greenhouse. Someday, take a 
walk through it and if you should 
see Ron washing one of the 1,500 
pots he washes weekly, ask him if 
he is giving away any plants 
today... you will be surprised with 
what vou walk out with 



A 



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JOMfisonS 



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FISH or CLAM FRY 

WED. & FRI 

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Enjoy life at . 



Quiet 



Cliffside Apartments 

Its- lhan .i minutes from campus 

on bus route 

and budget priced, too! 

Kasketball & Volleyball included 
Swimming Pool. Tennis Court 

One bedrooms start at $165 
Two bedrooms start at $195 

We ha\ e pride in our maintenance 

Kurniture and air conditioning optional 

in aires of private wooded area for exclusive use of resident 

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Management by: Hodgkins Real Estate Management 

NAHB Registered Apartment Manager 

665-3958 



TENNIS RACkETS 

and 

TENNIS BALLS 

A. J. HASTINGS 

45 South Pleasant St., Amherst 



University of Massachusetts 

HOUSING 

REFERRAL 
SERVICES 

STUDENTS 
RENTAL AGENTS/PROPERTY 

OWNERS 

If you are a student looking for housing or if you are a rental 
agent with a large number of units or if you are a small 
property owner and are seeking tenants for a spare room or 
upstairs apartment, use our services; they are FREE. 

We have established a new computer based housing 
referral system in Amherst which serves the Pioneer 
Valley. We are not a rental agent but simply a service 
facility seeking to bring people and housing together in the 
most propitious manner possible. Through a cooperative 
agreement with 5 Colleges Inc., we can now offer services to 
all members of the Valley academic community. Contact: 

Off-Campus Housing Office 
:i IMunson Hall 
I Mass -Amherst 01002 
Phone 413-545-0865 




at 

Mountain Farms Mall 

Route 9, Hadley 



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pkg per customer Good Mon , July 28 -Aug 2 



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j.p Urnll one pkg per customer Good Mon . July 28-Aug 2 

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25 extra value coupons and a great turkey special are just the beginning of what's good 
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US. Grade 'A" 



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Cash Refund 



IT MM. with puichttM of Cr«t 1 M . Secrtt A«tt-Per»p«r»ot 6 or . wd 
Prrtl (liquid ; 01 or Concentute 3 oi ) GH roquired certiticite it oui store 
«l>«n you *t our Display for Ootoils MAIL IN Br OCTOBf ft 4 Wi 



Crest Toothpaste 
Prell Shampoo 
Secret Deodorant 




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Budget stretching ^M%M 
value for your dollar # ^Pl 

Singleton Shrimp Cocktail 
Langostino Cm r H ™„ B " na 
Stop & Shop fish»nics 

White Gem U.S. Grade "A 

Chicken 



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CHIP* 



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put I 

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easts 

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Whole 
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*K— •ttuelivu Mon July 2t-S»l »u9 3 In li.mw 10 all ol ou' cui 
<on>*fi «• r«»*fv« thu fiahl to limtt ••!•• to inraa pKkag*« 0' any itam 
aicapt wha'a oltvarwaa notad Kama orfatad 'Of tola nol avatlabla m com 
UN ot to olna. WW daaUia ot «no>aaaia<a •»•>> prtcoa atloci.rt 
Monday thru Saturday 



I 

& Chips ; 

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16 oz. package 

frozen 284 | | 

'j 'iirnit on* pkg p*x currtomer Good Mon July 28-Aug J|£? 

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Good Moo July 28 Aug 2 





THE 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER CO LLEGIAN , Wednesday, July 30 19?J . 



>wss^>«sssss«sssssw«wssssssssssssssssssssssssssss 



Turning Point 



by Kris Jackson 

Vaughn Bode, the Cartoon 
Messiah and author of Cheech 
Wizard, Junkwaffel, and a host of 
other comics, died at his San 
Francisco home a few days ago. 



In Menooriam- 




"He choked to death while doing 
his own private form of 
meditation." Vincent said when 
contacted at his Oakland home. 
"Death was quick and painless, 
with no sign of a struggle. 

Bode employed a self-taught 
form of meditation involving 
constricting his breathing. 

Vincent Bode says that he is not 
sure that his brother's death was 
accidental. "I think he just decided 
that it was time to go, and went," 
he said. 

Bode, who made appearances at 
UMass and Amherst Coliege with 
his Cartoon Concert last fall, was 
not depressed lately; on the 
contrary, when this reporter last 
saw him at a comics convention in 
New York, he was ecstatically 
happy and said that he had solved 
all of his personal problems. 

Vincent Bode plans to carry on all 
of his brother's business dealings, 
and, with the help of others, to 
carry on his brother's work. 

A small funeral service has 
already been held. 



Campus Groups 
Unite! 



There will be a meeting of the 
Resource Network today, Wed- 
nesday, July 30, at Noon in Room 
811 Campus Center. 

People representing each 
organization planning to speak at 
the August 6 Ways and Means 
Committee hearings in Boston will 
read a first draft of their testimony 
at this meeting. 

Final presentations on Campus 
will be made at a more publicized 
public meeting to be held the day 
before the hearings, August 5. All 
people and organizations are being 
invited to join in both these 
meetings to plan for the hearings. 



The resource network is a 
meeting ground of a broad 
spectrum of concerned groups 
including the campus unions, 
AFSCME, Americans Federation of 
State, County and Municipal 
Employees; MSEA, Mass. State 
Employees Association; MSP, 
Mass. Society of Professors; USE, 
University Student Employees; and 
GSEOC, Grad. Student Employee 
Organizing Committee, the 
Graduate Student Senate, 
University Women's Caucus, SAC, 
Student Action Committee, 
Departmental groups and in- 
terested individuals. 



Wednesday, July tt, 197S 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Caustic Comments 



By Mike Kostek 



BLACK GIANTS 

(Columbia KG 33r02) 
time 95:14 
The names a'one make this 
one a hell of a record. You've got 
Duke, Miles, Monk, Basie, Tatum, 
Blakey, Powell, Armstrong, Diz, 
Mingus and more more more on a 
two- record set that goes for a dollar 
more than the price of a normal 
single disc. Any album with vintage 
unreleased Miles and Ellington on it 
is an event, and the other stellar 
gents make this a treat as well. A. 

Forest of Feelings 

DAVID SANCIOUS 

(Epic KE 33441) 

time 46:36 

Bruce Springsteen's former 
keyboard player has more than a 
few grand ideas to sprinkle on us, 
but they are too often obscured by 
Bill Cobham's ham-fisted 
production. We are given too- 
obvious restatements and 
resolutions, making big ideas 
bloated and over the edge. Bminus. 



Hokey Pokey 

RICHARD €r 

LINDA THOMPSON 

(Island ILPS 9305) 

time 34:10 

Here's that word again -style. 
English folk of the lilting sort 
can be as limiting as any other, and 
certainly will lead us to no new 
worlds of thought, but it seems to 
inspire a high degree of stylish 
integrity in its modern day prac- 
ticioners. Richard and Linda 
Thompson (he late of Fairport 
Convention) are two of the finest 
reinterpritors in the genre. 

Occasional passages into lyrical 
over-simplicity are made up for by 
Richard's supple, sure guitar work 
(as good in its way as Clarence 
White's was with the Byrds) ex- 
cellent overall production and 
compelling arrangements. Bplus. 

The Heat Is On 

THE ISLEY BROTHERS 

(T Neck PZ 33536) 

time 37:15 

A couple here tor the Isleys' 
Best Of, Vol. 3 album ("The Heat Is 
On", "Fight The Power"), but 
otherwise slowly unremarkable. 



Notice 



Cplus. 



It has been the intention of 
the Summer Activities Program 
and the Division of Continuing 
Education to bring to the 
campus community this 
summer the best possible 
quality in programming given 
the financial restraints. Our goal 
has been two fold; enjoyment, 
and educational. We invite any 
comments, criticisms, or 



suggestions that you might 
have as it relates to the 
Summer Arts Activities. We are 
here to serve you and would 
welcome ideas for future ac- 
tivities that are planned. 

Please address all comments 
to the Summer Activities 
Office, Room 416, Student 
Union and help us to make it 
the best possible summer there 
is. 




fvM/£/l/jA,t^ 



Buy 1 Cone 

We also offer: 

• sundaes 

• boats 

• pizza 





Get 1 Free! 



hot dogs 
hamburgers 
subs & 
Y2 subs 



Welcome 

Little Leaguers! 



With this coupon 



St(tp in after 

your 

next game. 



open every day from noon till the wee hours 

253-9363 at the Old Amherst Creamery 

at the corner of Sunset Ave. & Fearing St., Amherst 



\ 



Sports 



Pats' 3rd string QB: 
Not a big future here... 



By Mike Kneeland 

Neil Graff practices football for a 
game fans hope will never come, 
one in which quarterback Jim 
Plunkett is injured. 

It will even take more than that 
unkindly cut by those football gods 
who often plague the Patriots. 
Graff actually the number three QB, 
playing behind veteran Dick Shiner. 

How does a man trying to make 



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his mark in the NFL take to such a 
role? 

"It's frustrating with a guy like 
Jim Plunkett playing ahead of you. 
There's not a big future here for me 
as long as he's here," says the 
handsome Wisconsin graduate 
from Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 

"A lot of making it in the NFL is 
being at the right place at the right 
time. If you look around the league, 
you'll see any team has one 
established quarterback. Someday 
I'll get a chance of it." 

Graff's main contribution last 
year, his first with the Patriots, was 
as the ball holder for field goal and 
point after attempts. "I'm lucky," 
says kicker John Smith, "to have 
such a good ball holder. It can make 
a big difference." 

At Wisconsin, Graff set four 

passing records in the all-Big 10 

conference and played in the Blue- 

t Gray game. He was drafted by the 



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62 Main St., Amherst 

Tel. 253-7835 

EAT IN OR TAKE-OUT 

LUNCH SPECIALS 99C & up 




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Every Saturday and Sunday, Bonanza is giving a"50 cent rebate on 
both the Sirloin Strip dinner, and the T-Bone Steak dinner. 




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Fine China • Silver 

Giftware 

Amherst, Mass. 
253-7615 



The Sirloin dinner includes a 
Sirloin Strip steak, salad, 
potrito, and bread 



(includes 50' 
rebate) 

$2.99 




Mountain Farms Mall 
Rte. 9 Hadley 





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POOR RICHARDS III 



presents 



LILITH 

A WOMEN'S BANO 

Featuring a dynamite horn section! 
Rock, soul and oldies 



July 30 and 31 
only S 1 

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Vikings in '72, played on the taxi 
squad, and eventually found his 
way to the Patriots last year as one 
of the 80 free agents head coach 
Chuck Fairbanks took a look at. 

"I talked to some people around 
the league and I thought this would 
be the best place to come. I knew 
I'd get a chance, a fair shot at 
making the team." 

Capabilities? "Leadership is 
strong. I've been a quarterback 
since I started playing football in 
junior high school and I've always 
had a knack to get people to work 
at their highest level." 

Graff is not even a shoe- in to 
make the squad this year. Teams 
may only carry 43 players this year 
— four down from last — and 
Fairbanks will have to cut some 
mighty fine ball players to make 
room for Graff. If Plunkett were 
injured, Fairbanks would much 
prefer the presence of veteran Dick 
Shiner. 

"There's always that worry" 
Graff says. "You don't know what 
the coach is thinking. 

"It wouldn't be the end of the 
world if I got cut. I've done my 
graduate work in Business and 
Finance. Football is something I 
want to do." 

Whatever Graff does, one thing 
is for sure: it'll depend on those 
football gods high above Schafer 
Stadium. 

ON THE SIDELINES 

If you want a celebrity to sing at 
your Yuletide party, don't ask 
Patriots' rookie guard Myke Horton 
to sing Jingle Bells. 

In Paper Lion fashion, 
Horton was ordered to sing the 
song at dinner Monday. What came 
out was as off-key as it was off- 
season. . . Third round draft choice 
Pete Cusick was also told to stand 
on a chair and sing a song. He got 
on the chair, looked around, looked 
around some more, then said he 
didn't know any songs so he sat 
back down. No one argued. . . 
Well, young Len Burman from 




George Withers 



Neil Graff: Frustrating in the wings. 



channel 4 in Boston made an im- 
pression with the players Monday. 
His camera crew here included a 
knock-out chick in knock 'em out 
clothes. Mercy! . . . Kicker John 
Smith returned home to England 
for five weeks during the off-season 
and friends couldn't believe his only 
job was to kick the ball. That is still 
a novelty even to former soccer 
player Smith himself, who played in 
the first football game he ever 
saw. . . With all the big-time sports 
writers in attendance, former 
Collegian sportswriter Bill Ballow — 
now sports editor of the Amherst 
Record — raised a few eyebrows 
when he said he couldn't stay for 
supper because he had to cover a 
little league baseball game. He 
wasn't joking. . . Who says Chuck 
Fairbanks got no humor. A Wor- 
cester sports writer asked the 
coach what effect the new rule 
reducing squads from 47 to 43 



players will have on the Patriots. 

Chuck thought for a minute, and 

with a straight face said, "It means 

we'll have four less players." Watch 

out Bob Newhart. . . Quarterback 

Jim Plunkett may be a nice guy but 

he doesn't have a million-dollar 

smile. He pesed (or some pictures 

with fans Sunday, but looking at his I 

smile pose you'd think he was just 

threatened by Dick Butkus and was 

trying to pass it off with a grin. . . I 

was plain impressed when I saw 

Steve Corbett casually pour himself 

three glasses of chocolate milk and 

two glasses of punch at supper. 

"That's a lot of liquid," I meekly 

said to the 6'4", 248 pd. guard. 

"Heck, that ain't nothing," he 

said... And finally, this week's 

elephant testacle award goes to 

me, for writing this article and 

having to face the players 

tomorrow. 



X 



if 11 Mill 



iiii.ai.il 



Bergquist heads 

US Federation 
Baseball Team 

By John McHale 

Nineteen college players and three assistant 
coaches have been named to the 1975 U.S. Baseball 
Federation Team which will play in the Columbia 
(South America) Friendship Tournament July 27 
through August 7 as well as the Intercontinental Cup 
Games to be held in Canada August 14 through 
August 31. 

UMass baseball coach Dick Bergquist, who will be 
head coach of this year's U.S. squad, announced that 
his assistants will be Richard Jones of Southern 
Illinois University, Preston Miller of Mercer County 
Community College in Trenton, N.J. and Robert 
Smith of Greenville (Illinois) College. UMass will also 
provide the team trainer in the form of Jim Laugh 
nane, who will head south with the others. 

The team is composed of six pitchers, two catchers, 
seven infielders and four outfielders from around the 
country. 

Among the star studded cavalcade, the only 
familiar face to coach Bergquist is Jerry Mondaho, hie 
all-New England third baseman from UMass. The 
other New Englander to make the squad ia outfielder 
Ed Flaherty of Maine. 

Mondaho. who ia an excellent fielder and ia quite 
versatile in the infield, sported a .270 batting a ve r age 
for the Minutemen teat spring. Ha had been playing 
with Chatham of the Cape Cod league. 

"I'm excited about this trip/' said Mondaho. "I'd 
probably never gat another change to go to South 
America." 




The 5' 8". 180 pounder frrm Amaabury also plays 
football (running back) and will be returning in the fall 
for his senior year. 

The team has a further touch of UMass flavor in 
addition to its head coach, trainer and one player. 
Pitcher Steve Powers' father graduated from UMass 
in 1942 whan it waa Mass. State. The C as to r n ien was 
surprised whan talking with coach Bergquist by 
telephone, that hie alma mater had changed names 
and grown so. 

continued on psge IS 



, , • . - • • t 



tf-V-WlAS 



THE MMfft^ ,CCTTC « tiMMER CQL_J_0____. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 




Movies 
this week 



WEDNESDAY. JULY X 
CC AUDITORIUM &00 PM 
FIREMAN'S BALL" 

by Miles Forman 

The firemen of e small Czech village stage 
a ball in honor of their aged chief: but the old 
man is quickly forgotten as the affair gives 
way to a torrent of catastrophies. A delicious 
parody-fable of Slavic bureaucracy. Initially it 
was a witty editorial on lifestyle in Eastern 
Europe. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6 
SU BALLROOM 8.O0 PM 
"THE PRIEST AND THE GIRL" 
by Joaquim Pedro 



Based on a famous poem by Carlos 
Drummond de Andrade, this film by the 
director of "Macunaima" is a moving drama 
of two young people fighting against 
prejudice in a small village in the Brazilian 
countryside. The film succeeds in revealing 
the same tortured struggle between sex and 
Catholicism familiar in the novels of Mauriac 
and Bernanos. A luminous film about the th- 
warted love of a beautiful girl for a priest in a 
remote country town. 89 min. 



Pottery 
Demonstration 




A demonstration of 
pottery techniques will 
be held Thursday, July 
31 from noon to 2:00 
p.m. on the Campus 
Center Concourse. 

The demonstration 
will be given by Elizabeth 
Ralowicz, Marc Zim- 
merman, Danny Spier 
and Michael Dziewit. 
They will be showing 
various clay techniques 
including hand building, 
throwing on a pottery 
wheel, trimming and 
clay preparation. 

Spier developed his 
skills on a home-made 
wheel using beach clay. 
Ralowicz began working 
in clay two years ago in 
Idaho and hopes some 
day to teach ceramics. 
Both Zimmerman and 
Dziewit developed their 
techniques working at 
the Student Union Craft 
Shop. 





" The Constitution and All Those 
OtnWr Documents," the seventh in 
a series of Bicentennial lectures, 
willbe presented Tuesday, August 
5afl2:00 p.m. in the Student Union 
Colonial Lounge. 

Milton Cantor, professor of 
history at UMass, will focus 
primarily on the Declaration of 
Independence during the informal 
discussion. Cantor intends to 
discuss what that document's 
premise was, where it failed, who 
was excluded from it and whether it 
will continue to be a useful 
document in the future. 



Cantor has written, edited and 
contributed to several works on 
American history. He is the author 
of Wax Eastman, former managing 
editor of Labor History, editor, of 
the book, Alexander Hamilton and 
co editor of the Pocket History of 
the United States. 



Milton Cantor 



APPEARING THIS WEEK AT THE 

T.0.C: 

THE CONTEMPORARY FOLK & 
TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC OF 

st. jumes gat. 

DONT FORGET WEDNESDAY NlTE: 

13* T.O.C DISCO 

NEVER A COVER CHARGE ! 



Student Union 
Art Gallery 

New York artist Laurie Anderson will give a performance in the Student 
Union Gallery on Wednesday, July 30 at 7:00 p.m. 

Anderson is a performing visual artist. Her presentation on Wednesday 
will be from part two of her work, "For Instants: An Ongoing Investigation 
of Grimmer Grammer." 

The performance is free and open to the public. 



Here at FentoiYs you'll find 
all your tennis needs . . . 

Tennis Apparel: Adidas 




Lunch Hour Music 




Harlan Sacks 



The Summer Ac- 
tivities music hour series 
continues today, 
Wednesday, with local 
musician Harlan Sacks 
performing at 12:00 
noon on the Campus 
Center Concourse. 

Sacks will accompany 
himself on acoustic 
guitar, performing what 
he describes as "quiet 
folk music." His 
selections will include 
several original com- 
positions as well as more 
traditional folk songs. 



LANDRY'S MARKET 

The Oldest Grocery in Amherst 



Tennis Rackets: 



Tennis Balls: 



Tennis Shoes: 



We do 



Wilson, Dunlop, 
Davis, Spalding, 
Seamco, Bancroft 

Wilson, Spalding, 
Dunlop, Tretorn 

Converse, Adidas, 
Nike, Pro-Keds, 

& Patrick 

i 



Restnnging Wrist Bands, Head Bands, Presses, Covers 

FENTON'S 



253-3973 



tvuin Street, Amherst 
ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 
WHOLESALE* RETAIL 



Budwe iser — 1 2 oi . — $.7$ case 


1.4$ six pack 


Munich — 12 oz. — 4.15 case 


1.05 six pack 


Balentine Ale — 12 oz. — S.SS case 


1.39 six pack 


Heineken — 12 oz. — 14.*$ case 


3.75 six pack 


Wurlzbuger — 12 oz. — 14.W case 


3.5* six pack 


Ouinoss — 12 oz. — 14.0S case 


2.49 


Foster Lager beer — 2$ oz— 11. -Scate 


.99 bottle 


Ice (eleven pound bee) 


sec 


Charcoal — it lb. boo. 


1.29 


Fresh ground beef 


79c lb. 


Breakfast Sausage 


Lit lb. 


Filet Mienon Steak (tenderloin) 


2.591b. 


Bottom Round Roast 


1.59 lb 


Cube Steak (cut from round) 


1.59 lb. 


Polish Salami 


1.251b. 


German Bologna 


1.15 lb. 


Old T y me Mot Dogs 


1.391b. 







western 
shirts 



sweaters 



, 



DAIRY 
Idolnot farm fresh milk 1.43 gal. 
Cabots Tripple score butter 19c 
Vermont Cheddar cheese 1 .49 lb. 



PRODUCE 
String beans 25c lb. 

Large Calif, cantaloupe 49c 

Cucumbers „ cn * 

Cabbage hea d 25c 



711 Main St. Amherst 253 5387 

On the Belchertown Bus Route 




X-ira large selection of used jeans 
Heavy brand name denim jackets, army 
& chino pants, corduroy leather & suede etc. 
Just Arrived New Shipmeni of Jeans 
Look for us at 65 University Drive 
next to Bells and Hampshire Veterinarian. 
Open Daily 10-6 Fridaye.es. till 9 



(July 30- August 5) ' . 
- Sww Of My Best Friends - 

Leon Redbonc - Rusty tm (Sunderland). Aug. 8. 
dean Living - fted Pantry (Beicbertovvn), J«*y 31-Aug. * 
Widespread depression ~ Lazy River (Northampton), July 31- 

Aug. 3. 
Mitch Chakour and the Mission Band - Rusty Neil July 31-Augv 

3. 

* Deadiy Nightshade - Uzy River, Aug. 5. 

Chris Smither - Chelsea House Cafe and Folklore Center 
(Brattleboro, Vtl, Aug* i"X 

With - Poor Richard's IH (Amherst), July 30,31. 

Reef Tears - Crystal Park (Paimerl, Aug. tZ 

Jim K Band - Bth Alarm (Springfield), Jury 30-Aug, 3. 

Some Of My Best Friends - Supermarket, Juki 30-Aug. 2. 

Real Tears - Rusty Natl, Jury 30. 

Jack Veronesi - Lakeview Inn (Southwick), Aug, 5. 

Handpicked — Lakeview Inn, Aug. 3. 

Magic Music Band - Turners Falls inn (Turners FaUe), Aug. 1,2. 

Johnny Walker Blues Band - Highland Lounge (Springfield), 

Aug. 1,2. 
Northeast Expressway - 4 Leaf Window (New Salem), July 31- 

Aug.3. 

Honey Bear - Smith's Beach (Southwfck), Jury 31 -Aug- 2. 
. Quik - Lakeview mn, July 31 -Aug. 2. 

Tupelo - Red Pantry, Aug. 3. 

firewater - Supermarket, Aug. 5. 

Tupeto *- Bernardston Inn (Bemardston), Aug. 1 



Top Of The Campus I 

Dial Tone Lounge (Mi 

Night Tueev _________________ 

Poor Richard's HI {Amhentf -Open Nightly except Monday; 

30,31;Ufth. > 

The Pub (Amhefst) ~ PfcadHh/Paeotheque Thurs. through Sun. 
Rachkfs {Hartley} - Open Nightly until 1 am. 
MaxweiTt (Hacfley) - Open WgWy, Jan Night every Sundev. 
Fifth Alarm ISpHngfiaW) - Disco Nights Mon. and Tuea. 
September's (CWcopee) - Open Nightly. 



Concerts 



( rindfcatae tw on sale at Ticketron in CC Hotel Lobby) 

SPRINGFIELD 
The Osmonds - Munch - Aug. 7, Civic Center r 
Sards & Croft - Aug. %. Civic Center 7 
Miss World USA Pagent [with Bobby Hope] - Aug. 17 

LENOX, Mass, Music Inn] alt T 
Bonnie Raiit — Aug. 9 

jerry Walker-David Sternberg Bend — Aug. 10 
New Bidets Of the Purple Sage, - Aug. 30 

LENOX, Mess. [Tangiewood] ad T 
Linda Ronstadt-Leo Kottke - Aug. 28 
David Crosey 9 Graham Nash ~> Aug. 30 



Outdoor Program 



■ Wednesday, July 30 
7:00 p.m. Outing Club softball game at Boyden fields. All are welcome. 

Thursday, July 31 

5:30 p.m. Outing Club trip. Rock climbing at Chapel Ledge. See the 
Outing Club bulletin beside the Student Union Ballroom for details. 

7:30 p.m. Hikecanteer organizational meeting. Persons interested in a 
hiking, biking, canoeing and orienteering race meet in room 168-170 of the 
Campus Center. 

Friday, August 1 

1 :00 to 6:00 p.m. Afternoon hiking trip across the Holyoke Range. Meet 
in front of the Student Union. Bring a trail snack and water. 

Tuesday, August 5 , 

5:30 p.m. Outing Club trip. Caving at Rattlesnake Gutter. See Outing 
Club bulletin board for details. 

7:30 p.m. Outdoor Program summer seminar series: knot tying 
demonstration. Knots will be shown and then people will have the op- 
portunity to practice them. Room 81 1 -815 of the Campus Center. 




P 

m 

ill 

m 



m 



Art you getting ripped off? 

Check out our prices and see if you are paying more 
than you should be for name brand soda. 
16 01. PEPSI $1.25 six pack 
12 oz. cans COKE $1.65 8 pack 

COTT quarts 38c each 

7-up — 16 oz. — $1.25 six pack 

We carry returnables 

We carry a full line of Regular and Diet Soda 

NAME BRAND SODA AT DISCOUNT PRICES. 

"WE ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS" 



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_!-*■■•*» ^^^ ^^^ . .,_-., ___, ,___ ,_,. ____, ___■ _B_B _■■_ ____ E__P _____ 



THE 
HUNGRY-U 






* • 






I 

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UNIVERSITY DRIVE 



INTRODUCING 

BEER and WINE 

Bottled Heineken - Draught Cambrusco 

Chianti and from the Sebastiani Vineyards: 
Burgundy - Rose - Chablis 

and delicious, new 

Submarine and Delicatessen Sandwiches. 

Come in and choose from 
an all new and wide selection of 
Subs and Deli Sandwiches. 
Our Great PIZZA tool 

OPEN— 11:00a.m. -12:00 p.m. — Mon. -Thurs. 
11:00-1:00— Fri.-Sun. 



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10 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEOIAN 



Wednesday. July 30, ltJS 



* 



Bits 



Wednesday^ July 30, it7S 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



!! 



Fish people 

On Tuesday. July 22, 1975 an 
Intramural Swim meet was held at 
Boyden Pool. Of the more than 25 
participants, excellent per- 
formances were made by both men 
and women, with Conrad 
Bergschneider taking 3 first places 
and Leslie Wilson taking a first and 
two third places. The highlight of 
the meet was the "funny diving" 
competition. No winner was 
decided upon because each dive, 
performed by the 8 contestants, 
was different. A good time was had 
by all, participants as well as of- 
ficials, and the meet itself was a 
success. 



three-year study which will begin 
by concentrating on school districts 
in the Hampshire Educational 
Collaborative and then extend help 
to the rest of the state and even- 
tually throughout the country. 

By devising more economical 
and efficient means to transport 
children who must go outside their 
school districts for special 
educational help, the grant project 
will help towns implement Chapter 
766, the one-year-old 

Massachusetts law which 
guarantees the right to an 
education to all children, aged three 
to 21. 

Agencies involved in the project 
— titled "Regional Transportation 
Systems to Meet the Special 




The fish people diving for mermaids at Boyden Pool... 



$85,000 
into motion 

The U.S. Department of Trans- 
portation (DOT) has awarded a 
grant of $85,000 to the University of 
Massachusetts for development of 
improved transportation systems 
for children with special education 
needs. 

The grant is for the first year of a 



Educational Needs of Handicapped 
Individuals" — are: the UMass 
Institute for Governmental Ser- 
vices, the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Education, Hampshire 
Educational Collaborative, and the 
U.S. Department of Transportation. 
Total cost of the first year of the 
project is $185,875 with UMass 
adding $37,825 to the DOT con- 
tribution of $85,000, and another 
$63,050 coming from the 
Massachusetts Department of 



Education and the Hampshire 
Educational Collaborative. The 
contributions may be in money or in 
kind. 

Brothers 
and Sisters 

Are you a black reporter, artist, 
layout personnel or advertising rep? 
Or would you like to learn any of 
these phases of newspaper work? 

NUMMO NEWSPAPER, the first 
black newspaper at the University 
of Massachusetts is recruiting 
personnel for our summer 
publication. Interested in working 
with us? Call 549-4534. 

lyr. old has 
far to go 

A handbook on Chapter 766, the 
year-old Massachusetts special 
education law, is available to 
parents and educators from the 
Institute for Governmental Services 
at the University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst. 

The book is titled "Thursday's 
Children" after the line in the old 
nursery rhyme, "Thursday's child 
has far to go." A major source of 
information on the law, it was 
funded by a grant from the 
Massachusetts Department of 
Education. 

"Thursday's Children" is a guide 
to implementation of Chapter 766, 
which guarantees the right to an 
education to all children from age 3 
to 21. The book analyzes the 
potential of the new law and some 
of the problems in implementing it. 

The law itself is printed in the 
handbook, as are lists of resource 
agencies for children needing 
special help — the mentally and 
physically handicapped, the deaf 
and hearing impaired, and the blind 
and visually impaired. There's also a 
list of miscellaneous resources and 
of legal services available. 

The handbook contains sections 
on children's right to education, the 
confidentiality of children's records, 
and the training of teachers and 
others to meet the provisions of 
Chapter 766. 




The 

bicentennial 
search 

The Bicentennial Committee at 
UMass has established a 36 show 
series entitled "Critical Issues in 
America's Future." This radio series 
will be broadcast over Radio 
Station WFCR from September 
until May and will conform with a 
national Bicentennial program 
called "American Issues Forum." 
The potential audience is 1.2 million 
people. 

We are searching for a person 
who is knowledgeable in the Bill of 
Rights and the Constitution and the 
political philosophies that those 
documents represent. The person 
we are searching for would have a 
debate involving a critical issue in 
America's future, and would be 
responsible for placing the 
arguments in constitutional per- 
spective. For example, a discussion 
about the infringement upon the 
rights of privacy through computer 
data banks might include 
representatives of law enforcement 
agencies, the Civil Liberties Union 



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and our constitutional expert. The 
person need not be responsible for 
all 36 shows. 

Written inquiryl only to: 
Bicentennial Committee — 200 Nills 
North, Campus. 

AI.B. delayed 



Due to technical difficulties, the 
"Who Killed JFK?" show with 
David Joyce of the Western Mass. 
Assassination Information Bureau 
of Amherst scheduled for last 
Sunday will be shown this Sunday, 
Aug. 3, at 1 p.m. The show, 
Conversations With, is hosted by 
Frank Maclnerney and is on 
Channel 40. 




II you 

still 
have any 
dinner- 
ware 
rain- 
checks... 




We'd like you to know 
we will still redeem 
your rainchecks this 
week and next . , . July 
21 thru Aug. 9. 

Sorry, only rainchecks 
will be filled. None of 
the feature pieces will 
be on sale. Our 15-week 
offering ended this past 
Saturday. 

These are the last 2 
weeks to buy any of the 
fabulous completer 
pieces. 

No rainchecks will be 
redeemed after Satur- 
day, August 9. We apol- 
ogize for inconvenienc- 
ing some of you in the 
delay of filling some of 
your rainchecks, but in 
these final weeks we did 
manage to redeem al- 
most all of them. 

and all thru this 
period you've been ab- 
solutely great in your 
patience and under- 
standing! 
Thank you. 



and Pieces 



G.S.E.O.C policy 

The Grad Senate recently met 
with Acting Assoc. Provost and 
Dean of the Grad School Vere 
Chappell and with Assoc. Dean of 
the Grad School Eugene B. 
Piedmont, and discussed the new 
policies regarding R.A. and T.A. 
appointments. 

The new regulations which will 
come into effect on September 1, 
1975, are as follows: 

1. The new stipend for full 
Research Assistantships and 
Teaching Assistantships is $3,600- 
academic year, for Associates it is 
$4000-academic year. 

2. The summer stipend for full 
Assistantships is $1050. There is no 
such thing as a summer 
Associateship. 

3. To qualify for a tuition waiver, 
a graduate student must have a 
minimum of $900-semester or $600 
for the summer. 



4. If you have a partial 
assistantship of $1800 for the fall 
semester, this will qualify you for a 
Spring tuition waiver. However, 
Spring Assistantships for $1800 or 
more are not retroactive for the 
previous Fall Semester. 

5. There is now a stipulated 
workload. A full-time assistantship 
or Associate is expected to work 20 
hrs-week for 2 — 16 week 
semesters, thus, a total of 640 
hours for the full year. A partial 
Assistantship or Associate should 
reduce his-her workload ac- 
cordingly. 

6. All graduate students who are 
working on a Masters Thesis or 
Doctoral Thesis must now register 
for and pay tuition on the same 
basis as graduate students doing 
course work. Naturally, they qualify 
for a waiver if they have an R.A. or 
T.A. 

7. Regarding additional com- 
pensation, it may not exceed (a) 10 
per cent of the regular full-time 




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denim skirts 

work shirts 

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equivalent stipend currently at- 
tached to his-her type of ap- 
pointment for additional service ' 
performed during the academic 
year, or (b) 25 per cent of this same 
amount for service during the 
summer, including service on a 
summer session appointment. 

8. It follows from above that the 
maximum amounts of com- 
pensation that a full-time graduate 
assistant may receive next year will 
be $4320 during the academic year 
and $1800 during the summer; for a 
full-time graduate Associate the 
corresponding amounts are $4800 
and $2000. 

9. The service assistantship 
category has been eliminated. 
These jobs will now be funded 
through hourly or weekly pay 
schedules with no accompanying 
tuition waivers. 

10. Your program advisor should 
have document P75-DH33 dated 
May 6, 1975, which contains the 
fine print from which the in- 
formation in this article was 
exerpted. See him- her if you have 
any questions on your RA-TA. 

Short 
distance run 

On a showery evening an en- 
thusiastic group of distance runners 
challenged a slick cross country 
course in the annual summer in- 
tramural long distance run. The 
race, run as the special event at the 
weekly Mount Sugarloaf Track 
Club Thursday night meet, began at 
Derby Track, progressed around 
the Boyden fields, and ended at the 
starting point. Twenty-four hearty 
souls finished the 2.2 mile course. 
These are the final results and 
times: 

1. Mike Conti 10:12, 2. Neal 
McGrail 10:15, 3. Henry Culver 
10:37, 4. Ron Heath 11:06, 5. Terry 
Sterling 11:07, 6. Rick Schnable 
11:13, 7. Rick McGinn 11:23, 8. 
Brien Johnson 11:46, 9. Steve 
Prouty 11:49, 10. Jeremy Wolff 
11:50, 11. Rob Wilson 12:02, 12. 
Walter Dunakin 12:18, 13. Sandy 
Butterfield 12:29, 14. Danny Johns 
12:52, 15. Ronny Lalond 12:55, 16. 
Don Grant 13:19, 17. Craig Trehub 
14:15, 18. Cindy Hastings 15:00, 19. 
Loretta Eiben 15:20, 20. Dave Eiben 
17:12, 21. Linda Eiben 17:13, 22. 
Charlotte Lettis 18:29, 23. Marilyn 
Bevens 18:29, 24. Tom Derderian 
18:29. 
Course Length: 2.2 miles. 



Softball standings 

f In Co-Recreational Softball 
Tournament Play, on July 24, 1975, 
The Softies defeated Petrie and the 
Plates for the Summer Campus 
Championship by a score of 10-5. 
Petrie and the Plates took second 
place. 

The following are team standings 
for Men's Softball Leagues: 
AMERICAN 

Rogers' Dodgers, 4-0. 

Beavers, 3-1. 

Coins, 3-1. 

Franks' Flunkies, 3-1. 

Grave Robbers, 3-1. 

Midnight Ashcans, 2-1. 

Education, 1-3. 

Sublimers, 1-3. 

Grantlings, 0-4. 

Uncle Johns' Band, 0-4. 
NATIONAL 

Uranus, 4-0. 

"DD 214", 3-0. 

Pipefitters, 3-1. 



Department. 

Another UMass student, Cathy 
Mulvehill, will report next Wed- 
nesday on her visit this past spring 
to one of the same communes, 
Tachai, in the arid loess area of the 
northeast. The meetings are held at 
8 p.m. in Room 102, Thompson 
Hall. 

. The efficient organization of farm 
labor and government programs of 
fertilizer manufacture, flood 
control, and medical care have 
meant a vast improvement in health 
and an end to the time when every 
year hundreds of thousands died of 
starvation, or in floods and plagues. 

Since few draft animals exist in 
most of China, Ms. Rosner said, 
tilling, harvesting, and transport are 
largely done by hand. The com- 
munes, therefore, have been able to 
mobilize an Unusual, huge reserve 
work force — millions of older 
women whose feet were bound in 
childhood and who cannot do 
much field work. 




"If you enter the Bike Race, you'd better wear your Bike." 



Bike race 



On Wednesday, July 30, 1975 at 
7 p.m. the Annual Summer Bike 
Race will be held on Stadium Road. 
The race sponsored by the Summer 
IM Program will begin on the north 
end of stadium road; entries will be 
accepted until the start of the race. 
Men and women will race the 1.7 
mile distance. For information, call 
the IM office, 545-2801, 545-2693. 



Captain Crunch, 2-1. 
Rolling Green, 2-2. 
Immorrill, 1-2. 
Beta Kappa Phi, 1-3. 
Economics, 1-3. 
Moskins, 1-3. 
Tsunamies, 0-4. 

Communes 
Chinese style 

The organization of Chinese 
agricultural communes and the 
almost unbelievably backbreaking 
toil of many millions of men, 
women, and children are changing 
the culture of the world's oldest 
civilization, an American participant 
in the effort reports. 

Ms. Marni Rosner, now a UMass 
student and a worker on two 
Chinese communes for several 
years, reported Wednesday (July 
23) on her experience there at a 
UMass meeting sponsored by the 
U.S. -China Peoples' Friendship 
Association and the Asian Studies 



Doomsday 
club 

(EARTH NEWS) - A group of 
California businessmen have 
formed what may be the most 
exclusive club in the world. Lifetime 
membership in the Scott Meadows 
Club costs $12,800, and entitles the 
member to protection against the 
Apocalypse. 

The club owns 712 acres of forest 
land in Northern California, where 
they're building a community 
storage facility for dehydrated 
foods. Each member is required to 
purchase a full-year's supply of 
dried foods, and is strictly forbidden 
to reveal the exact location of the 
club. 

When doomsday arrives, says 
promoter Max Hollis, the access 
road will be dynamited and the 300 
club members will "shoot to kill" to 
protect their food. 



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Convanltncti which make BRANDYWINE 

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Individually controlled cantral gas heat 

Central Air Conditioning 

An abundance of cloftet apace 

Extra security features including intercom 
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Large partially enclosed private patioe and 
balconlgg 

Luaurtoue wall to wall carpeting 

Beautiful new swimmtng pool and 
recreational facilities 

Beautiful wall kept grounds highlighted by 
large cantral pond 

F.ee UMass Bus Service 

Laundry facilities wall located 

Safe piaygroand for children 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
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12 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Review 



Wednesday. July 30, 1975 



Wednesday, July 30, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



13 



Another look at the Unity Ensemble 




Apologies... 

are in order to the members of the 
Unity Ensemble for the misin- 
formed coverage I gave their 
performance in last week's 
Collegian. 

For those of you who never read 
music reviews but love to see 
apologies-in-print, what happened 
is this: Having heard of the En- 
semble before and having, 
therefore, a pre-conceived idea of 
what they would be like, I attended 
the concert without reading the 
advance publicity, at least not very 

closely. In my ignorance, I ex- 
pressed, in the review, a certain 
amount of disappointment that the 
Unity Ensemble, contrary to my 
expectations, seemed limited to the 
more traditional 'jazz' forms. As it 



turned out, they were limited, but 
by their contract, not by their 
abilities. The agreement called for 
them to re-create the styles of early 
greats like Charlie Parker and early 
pioneering works by musician- 
composers like Miles Davis. All of 
this, Sulaiman Hakim and Chris 
Henderson of the Ensemble assures 
me, is worthy of respect and 
reverence, but is far removed from 
the material they usually perform, 
which is much more contemporary. 
If I'd read the publicity I would have 
known this. Obviously, then, the 
review was an unfair one, even if 
unintentionally so, and I extend my 
apologies to the members of the 
Unity Ensemble for a half-assed job 
of reporting. 

Your Sacred Cowboy 




Sulieman Hakim 



Chris Henderson 



In Concert 

Preservation Hall Jazz Band 

July 23 

Fine Arts Center 

By Bill Hasson 

What can you say? I mean really, 

what can you say? The music was 

strong. The musicians were in an 

exuberant mood and it appeared as 

if the evening could go on forever. 

It may sound strange for a person 

to s?y that they love another person 

whom they have never met and 

also love their music even if they 

have never been introduced to it 

before, but strange as it may seem 

that was the case with many people 

who attended the Preservation Hall 

Jazz Ba.id concert and fell in love 

with the music and musicians. 

Stamp your feet! Jump for Joy! 

and let it all hang out! was the 

mood throughout the performance. 

It was not like I wish I was in the 

land of cotton, or sitting on a 

plantation porch, sipping mint julips 

and swatting flies as the bullfrogs 

croak in the pond, but it was 

traditional New Orleans music 

transported to the Pioneer Valley in 

its purest form. 

Professor Max Roach started the 
evening by making a presentation 
to trombonist Big Jim Robinson 
and the band for their long standing 
commitment and contribution to 
the University community here for 
the last six years. Then the band 
took off into a series of un- 



forgettable standards and originals 
that have made them world 
famous. All of the would-be 

musicians and the aficionados sat 
in reverence and listened because 
they knew that they were in the 
presence of real giants. As soon as 
Mr. Percy Humphrey had finished 
delivering one of his flowing ser- 
mons on the clarinet, Willie 
Humphrey quietly got up and 
extolled the virtues of his trumpet 
that comes from a long line of great 
artists from Pops Armstrong to 
Miles Davis. Now it was the time for 
Big Jim to do his do, and do it he 
did, to death do us part. I mean it 
wasn't like an argument or 
misunderstanding, but rather the 
man having so much to say and so 
much to choose from he wanted to 
make sure he was understood. As 
Cie Frazier in the background kept 
saying, "that's right man, you tell 
em, and if they give you any mess 
I'll back you up all the way". And 
weaving throughout all this gumbo 
of sound was Sing Miller who 
played the piano like it was going 
out of style and possessed more 
than 88 keys. There was the big 
bass tuba voice of Al Jaffe ever 
present, forever mediating, but 
justifiably firm. 

They will be back next year and if 
some of us never see them agairr, 
they will live in our hearts and mind, 
and it will be like the inscription on 
the plaque which said "we truly 
move you all". Yes, we do. 




The Preservation Hall Jazz Band 



Ed McCarthy 





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basic course for men end women. 
Work and learn on your own car. 
Meets one evening per week for 
four weeks, end includes a 
Saturday workshop class. Cost is 
$18. For information call: 849-2800. 



Concerts 



In Concert: 

Bruce Springsteen £r The 

E Street Bend 

July 23 

Music Inn, Lenox, Mass. 

By M. "Portable Information" 

Kostek II 

One of the broad common denominators 
about the Rock &■ Roll biz is that more is less. 
More fans equal less music, less art, less 
acoustics, etc. Bruce Springsteen is 
beginning to crack the Market. Popularity. 
Putting more and more people together to 
see one performer builds and builds the 
pressure. The music struggles against the 
Event-ness of it all. Thus it is that we've seen 
Success mean excess for almost every rock 
star we know of. (We can count on The 
Who, John Lennon, sometimes The Stones, 
and who? to give us a true gut-wrench each 
time out,: Now maybe it was the full moon 
shining overhead that drove the 5000 or so 
patrons at the Music Inn wacky, or Bruce got 
a headful, or Bruce got zippy seeing 5000 
people there to see him, but last Wednesday 
we were left mostly in Common Land as 
Springsteen made with the Rock &■ Roll. 

Now Bruce has always rocked & rolled, 
but he's also always used R&R as a power 
tool in his songs. He uses it to get us to feel 
the blitz of a subway, the roar of the streetlife 
("Jungleland", as he calls it) and the Spirit In 
The Night. But there's always more than just 
bumpin', and Bruce, at his best, always takes 
us farther. Farther on out. Anybody can 
shake their ass to some funky slop and say 
Whooee, hot PARTS!', and enjoy a slick 
experience of their own — in touch with your 
touch — , but there's three million and five 
bands that can slammit so, and get us to go. 
Bruce Springsteen is one of those few who 
can lead it up so we can shake and get in 
touch, but, more importantly, blast us out of 
that narrow groove, showing us something 
new and valuable. 

New York-New Jersey street life may not 
set us free but there's quite a load to be told 
about the proceedings that go on there, and 
in the hands of a keen and sensitive observer 
like Bruce who knows how it rocks, and 
knows also that it takes more than one 
groove, one riff, one rhythm to tell us about 
someone OUT THERE ON IT, on the street, 




Debbie Schafer 



"Bruce Springsteen is one of those few who can lead 
up to it so we can shake and get in touch, but, more 
importantly, blast us out of that narrow groove, 
showing us something new and valuable,' 



being real as can be, yes, in such hands, it's 
the highest we can swathe ourselves in. 

Which is why Bruce inspires not fans but 
fanatics. And if 5000 or so want to perch 
peacefully on a Berkshire hillside to hear their 
boy, ok, and if a few of them in back wanna 
come up front to see their man, well, and if 
they have to stand up to see him (Stage is 
too high), um, and they block the view of 

those 4950 or so behind them who express 
their feelings by throwing ice cubes, carrots 
and beer bottles, well, isn't that in the spirit 
of Big Balls Billy and Spanish Johnny out of 
one of Bruce's songs? And if 500 or so of the 
patrons get worked up enough to throw cans 
and bottles at the stage in demand for a third 
encore, isn't that New Jersey? 

Ook. Here we have Bruce synthesizing his 
perceptions, telling us about people on the 
Mainline, (and getting past that — 
Springsteen's main theme is living hard, but 
getting out of that rut), and the crowd acting 
like they wanna get off on 83rd St. and join 
Crazy Davy et al. Funny. 

So either Bruce was on edge, or caught 
the crowd's malaise, but he really rushed 
through his involved spirit-story-line songs of 
the past ("Rosalita", "Growin Up";, giving 
little of the accutly sensitive, exciting, multi- 
faceted readings of his last area appearance, 
his brilliant Sanderson Theater concert in 
Springfield. Instead he leaned heavily on the 
apparently simpler tunes from his forth- 
coming album ("out in about 3 or 4 
weeks"), "Born To Run ", "Your Love Is So 

Fine", and old rock & roll classics like "Sha 
La La" and "I Never Had It So Good" that 
seemed to be the only music of the night that 
the band got themselves to dance to. They 
did do some serious ass and mind burning 
with parts of "Kitty's Back" and "It's So 
Hard To Be A Saint In The City", but too 
often things were, like Bruce's affected and 
cheap street punk manner (he just don't 
hafta play himself so cheap — , run through. 

A great concert, in normal terms, despite 
rampant crowd stupidity, but Bruce 
Springsteen & The E Street Dr. Crash & 
Burn Racing Team Band can go so much 
further. Don't let them get to you, Bruce. 



In Concert: 

Hoyt Axton 

Joan Baez 

Music Inn, Lenox, Mas*. 

July 19 

By Tyla L. Michelove 



Hoyt Axton, of "Jeramiah Bull- 
frog" fame, was terrible, it's as 
simple as that. Most of the not too 
complex songs were arranged 
exactly the same way. That is to 
say, they were arranged so that the 
instrumental part was just barely 

enough to support the vocals and 
the vocals were so poorly out of 
tune as to make the total sound 
boringly repetitious and almost 
annoying. Hoyt said that he and the 
band had been up for awhile and 
were very tired, other excuses 
followed as his hour went on. He 

attempted to substitute numor for 
musical integrity in a mad dash for 
audience sympathy, but it all came 
off as superficial and in bad taste 
(offensive in its stupidity). For an 
encore he brought on his two 
children, Michael and April and 
with Ms. Joan Baez did a rendition 

of "No No Song", children belting 
it out with gusto, albeit no melody. 
Ever see an eight year old sing "ten 
pound bag of cocaine" with a semi- 
serious grin on his face? Its un- 
nerving, and in no way saved the 
show. 

The sky got darker, not 
threatening, but rain seemed im- 
minent. The stage was framed by 
the soft, full greens and browns 



that seemed water colored by some 
impressionist and the bright 

balloons waved back and forth in 
slow time. Soft and slow the mood 
was set and the air held its breath 
as sound carried itself across the 
entire field. 

No matter how silly and pointless 
Joan Baez was with, her Edith 
Bunker imitations backed by her 
Edith Ann, it was her vocals that 
shone. The quality filled the field, 
echoing off the trees and filling the 
suprisingly large crowd's mind with 
even more softness; pleasant 
memories, a past with all the 
disillusionment left out. 

At first it was just Joan and her 
guitar singing songs she was ex- 
pected to sing: "Help me make it 
through the night," obscure union 
songs, protest songs, the glory of 
the oppressed Russian free thinker, 
etc. All was even and smooth, like 
the sound track of some sixties 
movie, complete with a long 
version of "Hard Rain's Gonna 
Fall." The rapport with the first few 
rows of people was nice if not 
cliched. "Hiya can you take all your 
pictures now I'll do all my faces in 
the first song, ya the hair's a little 
shorter but that's okay I'm having a 
good time it's my vacation what 




Joan Baez in concert 



Debbie Schafer 



song? I don't remember it anymore 
you want what? well ya ok. . ." 

And now for something com- 
pletely different. . . well, not really. 
Joan brought out her band (Piano 
and Keyboards - David Briggs; 
electric guitar — Dan Fergeson; 
drums — Jim Gordon; and bass — 
James Jameson). And Joan did a 
club act good for an up and coming 
band, but not what her voice was 



made for and not what the crowd 
came to see. "Please Come to 
Boston", "Turn Your Love My 
Way" and a dance version of 
"Simple Twist of Fate" (go ahead, 
wince, I did) got the crowd up to 
boogie. So much for folk singers of 
the sixties. 

On the whole, the mood of 
sixties' romanticism carried through 
the entire show. It was not until the 



ride home, the second thought, 
that the fact that we had been 
cheated sank through. The woman 
is talented, no question, but she has 
become as rough as Holly Near two 
years ago and sold out besides. The 
.vocal quality is there, but wasted on 
trashy material and a showy 'let's 
see how high and low I can make 
my voice go' attitude. It seems a 
shame. 



', > . . 



.' 



14 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



* Meat Cleaver 



continued from page 3 
you've got in order to plan ef- 
fectively," he added. 

Without the input of directives 
from the University, department 
heads are planning according to the 
best guesses they can make. Hunt 
said he was working with his 
program heads to establish 
priorities upon which he can seek 
exceptions to the freeze from 
administration officials. Hunt said 
an example of the predicament he 
was in was the necessity of using 
03 funds to fill the slot of a 
Secretary in the Rhetoric program 
instead of using 01 funds tied up by 
the freeze. "It's a stupid way to 
operate", said Hunt. He said it used 
up 03 funds that should be used for 
other purposes but because of the 
blanket freeze there is no other 



option. 

"In a time of scarce funds people 
do start re-examining what they are 
doing— to cut the fat, as long as we 
don't cut into the flesh and bone", 
said Chappell. "We're trying to 
make some rational plans for the 
future", he added. 

Chappell said extensive reviews 
of some programs had been 
conducted during the past year 
with the remainder to be examined 
this year. He said graduate 
enrollments were also being looked 
into. He said some increases and 
some decreases were likely and it 
might mean dollar savings by 1978- 
79. But he said immediate savings 
this semester were not possible 
without seriously disrupting 
programs. 




''From the students point of view this is of 
grave importance../' -Larry S. Roberts 



Wednesday, July 30, 1*75 



Wednesday. July 30, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



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Your Stars This Week 

By Stella Wilder 



For any lacking in concentra- 
tion, (his may well seem a week 
of opposite*. Unless held in check 
by an individual's determina- 
tion, tenacity, and insistence 
upon a single course of action, 
the forces which drive toward 
one goal will prove curiously 
unstable, shifting now toward a 
second aim. now toward a third, 
and so on Planning is extremely 
important to this week's success 

Spur-of-the-moment decisions 
and impulsive actions cannot 
possibly end in progressive, pro- 
ductive, or profitable enterprise 
Only an awareness of overall 
patterns, of generalities as well 
as specifics, can bring an in- 
dividual into line with the week's 
requirements, whether it is ad- 
vancement toward career goals 
that ls sought or attainment of 
social aims 

Conditions surrounding all 
deals of a business nature are 
such that extreme care must be 
taken not to allow emotional 
considerations to color - or dis- 
color -• the rational ones Per- 
sonal relationship on the other 
hand, survive and thrive via the 
emotional approach Problems 
concerning children may arise 
toward week's end. but they 
yield quickly, even passively, to a 
combination of compassion, 
finesse, and intellectual unders 
landing 



LEO 'Jul\ 23- Aug 7' - This is 
not the time to tempt late Keep 
in readiness for whatever occurs 
earl\ in the week Koll with the 
punches toward week's end 
(Aug fr Aug 22) - Take care not 
to attempt to force any issues 
over the next few days; other- 
wise, you will certainly find 
yourself jumping the gun by the 

il f|Miif p rrH 

VIRGO (Aug 23 Sept 7) - By 
week's end you should be able to 
see into your future at least far 
enough to be able to plan for ma- 
jor events to come (Sept. 8-Sept 
22) — For the present, you would 
be wise to keep calm and un 
committed Don't expect others 
to come your rescue, depend 
upon yourself for best results 

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 7) - 
Things may look darker than 
you expected early in the week 
By midweek, however, you 
should be able to see the lignt at 
the end of the tunnel (Oct 9-Oct 
22) - Be on your guard against 
the kind of physical activity that 
can be damaging to your health 
if carried on too l<mg Know your 
own strength 

SCORPIO (Oct 23 Nov 7) - 
Delays early in the week need 
not spoil your plans for the week 
as a whole Make up lor lost time 
during midweek, end on sched- 
ule at week's end (Nov 8-No\ 
21 ) — This is a week when vou 



should he able to fulfill a king 
term ambition Take into ac- 
count your own weakness as 
well as vour strengths 

SAOITTARICS (No\ £1 
Dec 7) - Activities usually 
engaged in early in the wivk 
should be pnstponed until rind 

week. Spend the next two or 
three days resting and relaxing 
(Dec 8-Dec 2D - A change of 
scene early in the week should 
make it possible for you to enjoy 
routine matters later on 
Recover your spirits through 
change 
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 Jan 6) 

- (iroup activities bring the best 
results by week's end You may 
nevertheless wish to work alime 
If this is the case, follow your 
own desires i.Ian 7-Jan 17' — 
Plans for the future grow out of 
your ability to reorganiie your 
schedule of activities this week 
Don't defend another for ill 
doing 

AQC ARIL'S (Jan 20- Feb 3> 

- An inspirational week Do 
your part in helping others to 
their success and watch the 
favor being returned in spades 
by week s end (Feb 4 Feb I R > - 
New friends prove extremely 
helpful this week Even so. you 
would he unwise not to allow old 
friends to have their say in your 
personal affairs 



* Bergquist 



continued from page 7 

The U.S. squad had one day of 
practice on the Massachusetts 
campus (at Lorden field) after 
convening on July 22 and left for 
Columbia on July 24 for the Friend- 
ship Tournament which will include 
teams from Cuba, Columbia, 
Mexico, Nicaragua and the United 
States playing at Cartagena, Santa 
Marta, and Barranquilla. All but two 
of the players arrived here in time 
for the practice. These games are 
also a tune- up for the more 
prestigious Cup Games, with Cuba 
and Mexico probably offering the 
toughest competition. 

This will be Bergquist's first 
venture into international baseball, 
and although he has a team of 
hand-picked college all-stars, nearly 
all of the players are complete 
strangers to him. He knows them 
only by their reputations. 

For these reasons the coach is 
loathe to make big predictions on 
the future of his U.S. Federation 
team. 

On a more optimistic note, Berg- 
quist pointed out his strong left- 
handed hitting: "Most foreign 
teams don't have good southpaw 



pitching." 

The impressive credentials of the 
individual players should hold the 
team in good stead once they've 
practiced together a bit, for while 
baseball is a team sport, its axioms 
are universal. Moreso than in some 
other sports, talent can do more 
towards gaining victory than ex- 
perience. 

"We've got a great bunch of kids 
and fine ability," said Bergquist. 
"I'd be very happy to take this team 
on the field next year for UMass." 

An exhibition game in Fenway 
Park on August 1 1 will highlight the 
team's four-day stay in the States 
before heading to Canada for the 
Intercontinental Cup Games. 
Competition in the Cup Games will 
begin in Moncton, N.B. on August' 
14 and eight days later the action 
moves to Montreal, Que. for the 
final nine days of competition. The 
eight teams vying for the In- 
tercontinental Championship in- 
clude Canada, Columbia, Italy, 
Japan, Korea, Nicaragua, Puerto 
Rico, and the United States. Here, 
Japan and Puerto Rico figure to be 
the teams for the U.S. to beat. 



*l/SE: up in the air 



Continued from page 2 

Bardsley argues that the Campus 
Center is a separate enterprise from 
j the rest of the campus. He points 
out that the Campus Center has its 
own personnel office, its own 
dismissal procedures and its own 
employee evaluation procedure. 

It is the USE'S belief that the 
managerial and operational 
autonomy the Campus Center 
enjoys separates it and its em- 
ployees from the rest of the campus 
and any attempt by the University 
to demand a campus wide union is 
merely a delaying tactic. 

Perhaps the most controversial 
charge brought before the Labor 
Relations Commission is the 
University claim that the USE 
organizational effort has been 
"tainted" by managerial in- 
terference. 

According to Bardsley, the 
University attorney has attempted 
to link the USE to the Student 
Organizing Committee (SOC) and 
the SOC to the Campus Center 
Board of Governors. If it can be 
shown that the SOC aided in the 
formation of the USE, UMass 
attorneys could claim managerial 
interference in the formation of the 
USE. 

The Student Senate established 
both the SOC and the Board of 
Governors. Although the function 
of the Board of Governors has 
never been adequately clarified, 
UMass attorneys are argueing that 
it preforms some managerial 
functions and that the SOC, by 
association, is involved in the 



management process. 

If it could be shown that the SOC 
helped organize the USE, the USE 
case could be damaged since it is 
illegal for management to become 
involved in union activities. 

According to Bardsley, the USE 
was not assisted by the SOC. 
Bardsley said that during the most 
recent day of hearings, David 
Sheehan, the USE lawyer, 
established that no financial 
assistance had been given to the 
USE by the SOC. 

Bardsley also pointed out that no 
USE member ever worked for the 
SOC. 

If the USE wins its case before 
the Labor Relations Board, union 
members expect to press for 
demands drawn up when the USE 
was formed. Among their demands 
are, "Equal pay for equal work, a re- 
hiring process that would be 
completed before the end of a 
given semester. ...and adequate 
number of work hours.. ..an af- 
firmative action program for 
student employment, a fair 
grievance procedure and clean and 
saf 3 working conditions." 

Should Campus Center workers 
become unionized John Corker 
expec s the Campus Center 
operation to become "mOfS 
complex." According to Corker,a 
student employee union would 
"not so much involve a question of 
wages," as it would require ad- 
ditional employees to process and 
keep track of union- management 
relatione. 



u 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEOIAN 



>. 



Wednesday, July 30, 



J 



Collegian Comments 



Bewildering 
Baseball 

Strategy 



by Mike Fay 



According to Media sports in New York 
City, the Boston Red Sox have atrocious 
pitching and the team's ERA average, or its 
bulge, is sufficient evidence of this fact? Or, 
the Red Sox pitching staff will collapse in the 
Fall. 

"That's only in Boston," says the Globe, 
the Herald, Channel 38, and WHDH, because 
the wall in left field will score runs for 
anybodv. But in New York, the Media sports 
don't believe it, quite loudly, on network 
T.V., on radio, in Sports Illustrated, and in 
the New York newspapers. 

So Darrell Johnson offered Luis Tiant to 
the Yankees in the first game of the recent 
and raucous series down in Old New York. 
Johnson cost the Sox and Tiant a win in the 
first game of the series by playing Bob 
Montgomery at first base, and everybody 
everywhere knows it. He made three costly 
errors. 

Tiant pitched a fine game and would have 
won his thirteenth, if Yastremski had played 
first base, instead of resting. And Beniquez 
did not fare to veil in right field. If only Yaz 
could have been ready, and rested, he could 
have helped in the outfield, too?? Oh, the 
absurdity of baseball strategy. 

Darrell Johnson has foiled the meanest 
critics the Red Sox have ever known. The 
New York Media sports and the Yastremski 
booers, (myself sometimes), discovered they 
are incorrect. 

Johnson spotted the Yankees one, 
sacrificing his best pitcher Tiant, and then 
won three straight. Great pitching. And Yaz 
ain't bad either. 

And Johnson wanted to prove it all, and 
rub it in, in New York. And what will the New 
York Media sports do now? Reassess? And 
the Yaz booers? There never were any. You'll 
see. 

Lee (13-6), and Moret (7-1), threw 
shutouts both, in Sunday's doubleheader, 
and in the second game of the weekend 
blowout, Reggie Cleveland allowed only two 
runs. ERA your bats New York! The pitching 
in Boston is beautiful. 

So Montgomery, (who cannot be faulted 
for his errors for he is a catcher), and 
Beniquez, cost Tiant, the Ace, a win. It was a 
win Johnson thought he could afford. To 
prove his main point. That good old Carl 
Yastremski is more valuable than ever. And 
this, Johnson amply demonstrated by resting 
Yaz. His fine season is finally coming into 
perspective. 

When Darrell Johnson can mount a 
counter attack against critics of the Red Sox, 
like the one he launched this past weekend, 
it's time to start guessing when the 
hometown team will reach .700 ball. 

And Wise is still to come! And Dick Pole 
will be valuable in September and October. 
L And what will Sports Illustrated do then? 



Now relax,(kl3e...we've still got a month. 

77iatfc plenty of time . 




Uhy,..theway 
he's talking.^ 
ov to me... as ff f 

Iuerea... a J 

sssms 

-thing// 



rfo» 



COMPUTER WORLD 



by Rob Melacasa 

Most people are familiar with most ob- 
vious relationships between man and 
computer: the cards with the little boxes you 
have to fill in with a number two pencil, and 
the now easily recognizable printed forms. 

But how many of us are aware of the 
extent to which computers control 
everything we do? Most people are hardened 
to them, and whenever a direct dealing with 
a computer is necessary, they fully expect a 
distaster. Actually, barring mechanical 
breakdowns, which do occasionally occur, 
computers are not themselves responsible 
for whatever happens to your course 
choices. A computer is only as good as the 
information it is fed, and it's rather picky 
about what it considers digestable. 
Programmers have a name for this principal, 
GIGO — Garbage In, Garbage Out. 

But when the menu is right, they chug and 
churn and do a myriad of things we were 
mortals never connect them with. Everything 
that goes on at this campus passes through 
one of our two (yes, we have two) com- 
puters at one point or another. Everything. 
Even those so-called meals at the dining 
commons are planned an entire year in 
advance so the computer can calculate how 
much of what types of food to order, and 
when. 

Everything administrative is done through 
the computer. Finally, at long last, someone 
(or more properly a group of someones) has 
decided to use the old nemisis for worthwnile 
endeavors. We now have, or soon will have, 
Casper — who is not a computer but a 
computer program to assist in course 
selection. There is also a computerized 
housing referral listing, computerized book 
ordering and a totally computerized library. 

There are some people, however, who are 
afraid of computers, due to the infamous 
reputation concocted by those whose 



schedules have been fouled. These people 
resist technological progress, and perhaps 
they're justified. A trip to the computer room 
is like something from Asimov's 
imagination- tapes whirring noiselessly on ten 
six foot high tape drives, printers typing out 
lines of eighty charcters simultaneously, 
chattering and clanking through miles of 
paper, and the central processor quietly 
doing millions of mathematical caculations 
in microseconds, overshadowing the in- 
significant operator at the console, and 
sending him messages and telling all the 
other machines what to do, blinking its 
console lights happliy. Like a dog's wet nose, 
the little blinking lights mean the computer is 
healthy. It's intimidating indeed, this 2001 
trip. But as it turns out, the computer is 
harmless. Nothing to be afraid of. 

But I'm a bit concerned about how far we 
can go with these mechanized brains. Most 
stores now have computer checkouts, which 
not only compute the price, but the tax, 
adjust the stock totals, and keep track of 
which items are selling well. Typewriters 
have memories, which record that which is 
typed for recall later. The larger television 
stations are totally computer operated, each 
roll of film started automatically at the 
precise moment. 

What's next? How about a computerized 
government? In the first place we could 
eliminate elections, which are fast becoming 
toss-the-coin situations anyway. No more 
ego, no more emotional pleas for votes, no 
more promises that aren't kept after the 
election time. The budget would be 
mechanically calculated and dispensed, with 
no room for manipulation. If the 
mechanization of government accomplishes 
nothing else, it could give the poor people a 
more egalitarian footing with monied in- 
dustrialists. But then, who would we get to 
program the government? 



State diet: 

'Bite the 
Bullet' 



by B.J. Roche 

In an editorial published last week in the 
Boston Globe, columnist David Farrell 
discussed the possibilities of tuition increases 
at state institutions. While such increases 
appear inevitable, it also seems that the 
bureaucratic fat cats will get fatter while 
student services continue on the Dukakis 
wonder diet. 

The latest phase of the diet is the 
"commuter cutback," a greasy little dish 
prepared by the master chef, Dr. Gage. The 
Office of Commuter Affairs was quietly done 
in last spring, leaving commuters, half of the 
student population, without the numerous 
services the office provided. At the same 
time, on campus students will have to deal 
with smaller area staffs and mandatory 
housing. 

Maybe a little spot reducing on the part of 
the administration is in order here. Many of 
the initial proposals brought out last Spring 
seem to have been lost in the shuffle, and 
deserve renewed attention. For example, the 
SGA proposal to institute a $10 application 
fee on admissions has been estimated to 
have the revenue potential of $200,000, in 
addition to cutting back on applications, 
which would provide a large savings of 
(wo) man power. Stricter controls of WATS 
lines are estimated to have the savings 
potential of $75,000 per year. What hap- 
pened to those suggestions? 

It is also a bit preposterous to be paying 
professors to do research, write books, etc.. 
all for the what seems to be ihe sake of 
"posterity" or the loan of a "big name." We 
have all at one point or another b >en at the 
mercy of a professor who just has no desire 
(or time) to teach. Why do we coi tinue to 
employ these people? The institition of 
tenure may prove to be the downfai rather 
than the saviour of higher education. 

Let's face it, college is big business $30 
billion annually, and increasing, according to 
the Chronicle of Higher Education. But the 
American Dream of the sixties has become 
the fiscal nightmare of the seventies. 
Granted, a tuition increase will bruise a lot of 
people's college intentions, but perhaps it 
will also ease the parental pressure into doing 
something one really does not want. It is time 
that the pretensions of a college education 
be shed and that potential as well as present 
college students take a look at their motives 
for attending college and decide if it is all 
really worth it. But once that decision has 
been made, money should not have to be the 
deciding factor. 

If, as Farrell states in his essay, the object 
of the tuition increases is the well to do 
family which "ducks the higher, more 
realistic tuitions" at private institutions, then 
why not institute a scale tuition according to 
income number of dependents, etc., to suit 
the individuals' resources? The proposed 
increases will do nothing but zone the lower 
class right out of higher education. Hey, 
maybe that's what they intended to do! 

In the meantime, the students will con- 
tinue to "trim the fat" by "biting the bullet" 
while down at Whitmore, they continue to 
eat cake. Let me be the first to nominate 
Jack LaLane for Chancellor. 



Correspondence One to go: medium burned 



T -e Editor. 

tulations Amherst Police Deptf Not 
lot,, someone robbed the First National 

Bank u, Amherst. Still no leads. . . the 
Amherst Police Dept is busy aumg otner ex- 
traneous police related affairs. 

The time is 1:30 a.m. Friday night 
[Saturday morning], absolutely no one on 
the road, that is Be/chertown Road. There is 
construction going on for a new bank in 
Amherst, and the corner is absolutely 
desolate of any motor vehicles. 

A stop sign. Massachusetts law requires 



that every motor vehicle stop for a stop sign; 
every subsequent car up to the third car in a 
row need not stop for that stop sign, rather 
then need only yield for any possible traffic 
encountered. 

O.K. No one is on the road; hell, it's 1:30 in 
the morning! We pull up to the stop sign, no 
one in sight. We pull out, slowly, checking if 
anyone is coming the other way. No one in 
sight, except Officers Do/esa and Sullivan of 
the Amherst Police Dept. 

Approximately 150 yds. later, officers D 
and S flash the circling blue lights. "License 
and registration please, " - the usual police 



rhetoric. About ten minutes later we are 
handed a citation, signed by officers D and 
S. 

District: Rural. Traffic: Medium. Medium? 
There's no one on the road! 

We: "Officers, could I borrow a pen?" 

Officers: "No!" 

We: "Could I have your names and badge 
numbers, please?" 

Officers: "No! They're on the citation!" 

We: "O.K. That's fine, so long as they're 
on the citation." 

Officers: "Do you go to UMass? Are you a 
member of the football team?" 



We: \At 6'2", 155 lbs. I "No, I work for the 
University. " 

Officers: "Oh, yeah, I hope you're enjoying 
your stay in Amherst." 

We: "Yes, well I live in Amherst all year 
round. " 

Officers: "Hope to see you again." 

We: "Uh, thanks. Oh, by the way, how 
much is the citation for?" 

Officers: "We have no idea! That's up to 
the courts to decide!" 

Yeah, thanks. 1:30 in the morning, no one 
on the road. "See ya later. " Nice going guys. 

Wayne D'agostino Sherry O'Neill 
Gary Daviau Steve LaBlanc 

Jeff LaBlanc Danel Barber 



Patriots Photo Essay 
A day in the life 

see page 4 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 




TELEPHONE 545 1982 
BUSINESS 545-0617 




AMHERST, MA 



WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 4, 1975 



UMass Tuition 



on its way up 



? 



by Dan LaBonte 

Students and their parents may have to once again dig deeper into their pocketbooks 
and bank accounts in order to afford the rising costs of state public higher education, 
especially here at UMass Amherst. 

Just two short months ago, while students were beginning their summer vacation, the 
UMass board of trustees voted an increase in mandatory residence hall and dining 
common fees. Now a third major increase, in the form of a tuition hike, seems apparent. 

Leaders of both the House and Senate have called for tuition increases, a special 
committee studying tuition has recommended tuition increases to the Massachusetts 
State College System Board of Trustees, and although UMass President Robert Wood has 
reportedly called talk of tuition hikes "premature", he also concedes there is "con- 
siderable sentiment" for a tuition increase. 

The tuition committee has recommended to the state board of trustees a two-step $200 
increase, with students paying $100 more in January and an additional $100 in September. 
The UMass trustees, however, have the final say In whether or not and by how much 
UMass tuition will Increase. 

The revenue raised from a tuition increase would not go directly to the university , but 
Into a "general fund" which belongs to the Commonwealth. The amount of money 
received by the university as a result of a tuition increase would be appropriated directly 

by the legislature. Continued on page 2 



Office of 
Commuter Affairs 

The Office of Commuter Affairs and its 
Director Dr. Helen Hill have recently 
become victims of the "budg«* cut 
mania". The entire office and the director 
have been totally eliminated. Paul Logue 
and Richard Wright outline the events 
which led to its destruction, and its impact 
on all UMass students. See page 3. 



Dr. W.E.B. DuBois 

The UMass press will publish the 
complete papers of Dr. William Edward 
Burghadt Dubois. Dubois, a native of 
Massachusetts, at the age of twenty six 
began a career that ensured him a per- 
manent and prominent place in both 
American and Black history. See page 8. 



UMass Tenants 
Association 

In a referendum held last week and 
organized bv the UMass Tenants 
Association (UMTA), eighty-eight per cent 
of the voting tenants in UMass married 
student housing supported the formation of 
a cooperative to take over management of 
University run apartments. See page 3. 



Pinball Wizard 

An entire fleet of new pinball machines 
have recently been installed throughout 
the Campus Center and Student Union. 
"All are either new, or recently refur- 
bished to the utmost in frustration", says 
artist Kris Jackson, who, using his pinball 
expertise, gives us a critique of their 
payability. See page 5. 




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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST «, 1*75 



Tuition up (in the air) 



continued from page 1 

"It's a policy matter," explains 
Howard White, a spokesperson 
from Wood's office. "If every time 
state schools or this university get 
into a bind, and tuition is raised to 
offset higher education costs, then 
this would establish a precedent for 
money needs between the 
university and the legislators. This 
would create a bad situation." 

In order to avoid the money-need 
precedent, the university has, in the 
past, "maintained very strongly 
that there be no direct one-to-one 
connection between the budget 
allocated by the legistature and 
tuition costs," according to White. 

"There is no iron-clad guarantee 
that if we do raise tuition, we'll get 
V amount of money in return," 
White said. "However, president 
Wood feels the legislature and the 
governor would recognize that the 
university is asking students and 
their parents to pay the extra costs 
of tuition, so some additional 
revenue is sure to come from a 
tuition increase," he added. 

In the event of a tuition increase, 
there will be no automatic increase 
in state financial aid in January for 
the estimated 6,000 students who 
will be on financial aid in \**> fall, 
according to Richard Dent, C eotor 
of Financial Aid Services at UMass. 

"As of now, as far as I know, 
there has been no decisions yet 
concerning any direct increase in 
state or university funds ap- 
propriated for the future to cover an 
expected increase in tuition," Dent 
said in a recent telephone interview. 

The money financial aid is 
currently awarding is over- 
whelmingly Federal money. 
"Approximately 85-90 per cent is 
Federal, and only 10-15 per cent of 
the total money comes from direct 
state aid," Dent noted. 

"In terms of the university, there 
will be additional federal funds 
irrespective of a tuition increase," 
he said, "since these funds were 
requested last fall." The funds are 
made available through the federal 
Basic Educational Opportunity 
Grant (BEOG)) program. 

The biggest problem, as Dent 
sees it, is caused by the absences of 
summer savings due to a lack of 
student summer employment. 
"Students who had jobs and could 
save money could probably pick up 
an increase in tuition, but those 
students who couldn't find em- 
ployment will be hurting come 
January," he said. 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 
COLLEGIAN 

EDITORS 

Dan LaBonte, Debbie Schafer 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Ken Shapiro 

ADVERTISING 

Alan Anastos, Peter Birnbaum 

CONTRIBUTORS 
Richard Wright, Fred Nobles, 
Mike Kneeland, George 
Withers, Stuart Cudlitz, Kris 
Jackson, Mike Moyle, John 
Neister, Susan Genser, Mike 
Kostek, David Sokol, Rob 
Melacasa, E. Patrick McQuaid, 
Brian Harvey, John Bally, Tom 
Balonek, Liz Brackmann, Paul 
Logue, 

Summer newspaper of the 
University of Massachusetts. 
The staff is responsible for its 
content and no faculty member 
or administrator reads it for 
accuracy or approval prior to 
publication. Unsigned editorials 
represent the view of this paper. 
They do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the student body, 
faculty, or administration. 
Signed editorials, columns, 
reviews, cartoons, and letters 
represent the personal views of 
the authors. 

The office of the 
Massachusetts Summer 
Collegian is on the second floor 
of the Student Union on the 
campus of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 01002, 
telephone: 545:1982. 



There will still be money available 
for those seeking financial aid in the 
Spring, however. Dent noted that 
most students who were awarded 
financial aid accepted the 
scholarship money, but the 
available loan and employment 
monev was turned down. Con- 
sequently, for the spring semester, 
there will be relatively little 
scholarship money and more loan 
and employment money. Details of 
exactly how additional financial aid 
money is to be awarded, if tuition is 
increased, will be worked out in the 
fall, according to Dent. 




In testimony before the Mass. 
House Ways and Means Com- 
mittee meeting on Monday con- 
cerning the proposed budgets for 
public education, Secretary of 
Education Paul Parks said a 20 per 
cent cut in the state's education 
budget would require dropping the 
$10.5 million state scholarship 
program and the $2.1 million aid 
program to disadvantaged 
students. 

In response to the state's 
growing financial insecurity and 
lack of student decision-making 
power over issues like tuition in- 
creases at state schools, Student 
Government Association President 
John O'Keefe has organized a 
meeting of all state schools and 
public institutions of higher 
education to be held on the UMass 
Campus Aug. 9. 

Nearly all of the schools have 
responded affirmatively to the 
conference, which will provide an 
opportunity to discuss all facets of 
governance and state budgetary 
and fiscal responsibilities, allow for 
an exchange of information be- 
tween the state schools, and prompt 
recommendations from students in 
decisions which directly affect their 
lives, according to O'Keefe. 



O'Keefe cited the lack of student 
input into areas of direct student 
concern, like tuition increases, as 
his primary grievance. "We're sick 
of only making recommendations 
which aren't responded to. It's time 
the students had some direct 
decision making power," he said in 
a recent interview. 

If necessary, O'Keefe warned of 
a "show of force" which could 
include a march on Whitmore. 
"Theoretically, we have the power 
to shut this school down," he said. 

The absolute final decision on the 
amount of a tuition increase, if any, 
Will come from the UMass board 
of trustees. Before they make any 
decision at all, however, president 
Wood has reportedly said "it would 
be irresponsible for boards of 
trustees to vote increases without 
knowing how deep the Legislature 
will cut their '75'76 budget 
requests." 

The Ways and Means Committee 
meeting for the UMass budget is 
today, but the House, as a whole, 
will not vote officially either way 
until sometime in the fall. The 
present $90.9 million appropriation 
for UMass is $3.2 million less than 
appropriated for FY 75, and $26.5 
million less than requested for FY 
76. 

Even with expected additional 
revenue incurred from a tuition 
increase, the figure falls millions of 
dollars short of a funding level of 
$103.9 million, "The first funding 
level which can be seriously 
considered as a responsible and 
realistic total," Wood said in a 
memorandum to the UMass trustee 
budget committee. 

In an effort to support programs 
at UMass, Student Senate Speaker 
Jon Hite has composed a letter 
which will be submitted to the 
Ways and Means Comm. at their 
public hearing today. In the letter, 
Hite states that students "hope that 
the educational opportunities 
which attract over 25,000 high 
school seniors to apply each year 
and which have attracted 17 of your 
colleagues will be given the backing 
that is necessary for their con- 
tinuance." 

If the UMass budget is not set at 
a figure of "realisitc" proportions, 
legislative leaders, state and college 
trustees, and university ad- 
ministrators believe a tuition in- 
crease is a viable alternative. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

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We have established a new computer based 
housing referral system in Amherst which 
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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1974 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Campus 

Commuter Affairs Office 

sentenced without a trial 




Last Spring the Office of 
Commuter Affairs and its Director, 
Dr. Helen T. Hill became what can 
safely be called the first victim of 
the budget cut mania that has been 
filling the press for the past few 
months. 

Reporters Paul Logue and 
Richard Wright present here for 
Collegian readers the events 
leading to the elimination of the 
Office of Commuter Affairs and its 
impact on all students at UMass. 




"Commuter services heven't been given equel treatment", 



'I assume responsibility for terminating the Office,' 



Dr. Helen T. Hill has been characterized by 
the President of the Student Senate, John 
O'Keefe". ..as one of the most energetic and 
creative administrators in Whitmore." 

According to Robert W. Gage, vice- 
chancellor for Student Affairs, Hill was said 
to be, "...a true professional and has had 
considerable success in her ventures. She 
has solid administrative skill, works well with 
both staff and students, and is clearly 
capable of managing a major administrative 
unit which has service, counseling, or 
educational responsibilities," he added. 

Yet these same two men have one other 
unique thing in common where it concerns 
Hill. Each has either called for her resignation 
or taken steps to have her contract renewal 
denied. 

"In the fall of 1974 I asked Dr. Gage to 
terminate Dr. Hill....", said O'Keefe. 

"One of the people in the (Commuter 
Affairs) Office (Dr. Helen Hill) has been 
notified that her contract will not be 
renewed", said Gage in an exclusive 
Collegian interview. 

Each man has a distinct relationship with 
Hill and the Commuter Affairs Office. 
O'Keefe is a former president of the Com- 
muter Affairs Assembly and Gage is the man 
who holds the responsibility for overseeing 
Hill's performance as a University ad- 
ministrator. 



-Helen Hill 

Today, instead of remaining in the har- 
mony of agreement over the fate of Hill, the 
two men have split paths and are locked in a 
struggle over the future of the Office of 
Commuter Affairs and Hill's job as top 
person in the office. 

"After I got to know them (Hill and Randall 
W. Dahl, assistant director of OCA) I thought 
they were really good people, probably the 
two best administrators they have over there. 
We started working pretty closely with 
them", added O'Keefe. 

"I assume responsibility for terminating 
the Office (of Commuter Affairs)", said 
Gage. 

On March 3, Hill was notified verbally by 
Gage that her contract was not going to be 
renewed. Written notice to that effect was 
received by Hill two days later according to 
O'Keefe. 

"It is difficult to understand why they did 
it", said Hill. "If they could just level with me 
then I could understand", she added. 

"What is really bad is we weie cut one 
hundred per cent where no other programs 
were cut one hundred per cent," said Hill. 
"Commuter services haven't been given 
equal treatment", she added. 

Gage said "The program has not been cut 
off completely". He said one person has 
been let go, another has been retained and 
selected services incudinq Day Care and the 



Food Stamp program will continue. 

"The program, as I interpret it, consists of 
a number of services and the services will be 
continued", said Gage. 

Gage has refused, even after repeated 
requests by Hill and others, to publicly an- 
nounce the phase out of the OCA according 
to O'Keefe. Gage has stated for the past five 
months that anticipated budget cutbacks 
this year was his primary motivation for 
releasing Hill and eliminating the Office. But 
he continues to remain silent in public about 
his decision. 

Hill said she plans to sue the University 
and to have the decision reversed in the 
interests of the commuting students here. 

"We have helped anyone who came to us 
regardless of their status as commuters or 
otherwise. We were a multi-service center 
actually", she added. 

O'Keefe has charged that Gage has sought 
to "...appease 'rabble-rousers', radicals, or 
whatever he considers us to be, he figured it 
would take us off his back if he fired Helen 
Hill," said O'Keefe. 

"I said that if he used my original 
recommindation to terminate Hill, and he 
thinks I'm crazy, then that means he must be 
crazy too — and that would be grounds for 
his resignation — which we asked for at the 
time", said O'Keefe. 

"As an administrator and as a professional 



— Robert Gage 

manager you don't terminate an office on 
one person's recommendation", added 
O'Keefe. 

Gage said no formal evaluation was ever 
made of the Office of Commuter Affairs 
which has been operating for two years here. 

"We make informal evaluation all the time, 
in terms of productivity, in terms of the use 
of resources", said Gage. But he added no 
formal study has ever been conducted, 
rather, he has listened to the evaluative 
comments of persons like O'Keefe and other 
members of the commuter assembly who 
made some "...firm recommendations that 
the people in that office (OCA) not be 
continued", said Gage. 

"He didn't think we had the capacity to 
work things out with the OCA which we in 
fact did ", said O'Keefe. "So I don't think his 
judgement to terminate the office was based 
on very much professional evaluation," said 
O'Keefe. As he said he hadn't done a study, I 
think it was more political expediency", he 
added. 

According to O'Keefe the appeal by Hill 
and efforts by members of the Commuter 
Assembly to have the Office of Commuter 
Affairs reinstated will continue until the 
question is resolved. 

"A year ago he (Gage) may have been 
right, but it shows that since people are 
upset that we are doing some kind of a job 
here", said Hill. 



UMass Tenants Association 

cooperative favored, proposal may be delayed 



by Fred Nobles 

In a recent referendum, eighty-eight per 
cent of voting tenants in UMass married 
student housing supported the formation of 
a cooperative to take over management of 
University run apartments. 

The results of the vote will be included in a 
management proposal which must be 
channeled through the UMass Amherst 
administration before reaching the Board of 
Trustees for final consideration. 

The UMass Tentants Association (UMTA), 
which organized the referendum, originally 
hoped to present the proposal before the 
Trustees meeting on August 6. Dr. Robert 
Gage, Vice-Chancellor for Student Affairs, 
recently speculated that the proposed may 

be delayed due to legal problems. 

Although UMTA members are hopeful of 
presenting the proposal at the Trustees 
meeting on September 3, there are in- 
dications from the UMass administration that 
it may be postponed beyond that time. 

During Wednesday's referendum, UMTA 
members were able to reach 233 of the 391 
UMass operated married student apart 



ments. Each apartment unit was allowed one 
vote, with three options on the ballot. With 
sixty per cent of the units voting, 175 voted 
to support and join the cooperative, 31 voted 
to support but not join and 27 voted against 
the cooperative. 

If the cooperative proposal is approved by 
Trustees, members will receive a reduction in 
rent in return for contributing about two to 
three hours of labor each month for the 
maintenance of the complexes. 

The UMTA anticipates members will save 
between $12.50 and $17.50 in rent each 
month. To become members, tentants will 
be required to purchase at least one $10 
share in the cooperative. 

Pat Walker, a spokesman for the UMTA, 
said recently a cooperative would be able to 
manage the apartments better /than 
the University. Walker specualtes UMass 
could save $100,000 in fiscal 1976 if the 
cooperative is given control of apartment 
management. 

The cooperative will be modeled on a 
similar tenant organization at the University 
of Minnesota which has been operating 
successfully for five years. It would hire a 



professional staff to oversee management of 
the complexes as well as between 15 and 20 
student workers. The UMTA expects to give 
preference in hiring to tentants of the 
complexes. 

Wednesday's referendum is the latest 
development in a move that began over a 
year ago when tenants tried to gain more 
control over management of apartments. 

Opposition of University control of 
apartments gained momentum last year 
when a rent increase to cover the cost of 
operating the North Village complex was 
passed on to tenants of the Lincoln and 
University apartments. 

North Village is the newest and largest 
complex with 391 apartment units. Residents 
of University and Lincoln apartments 
protested the rent hike in their complexes, 
pointing out that the higher rent was not 
reflected in increased operating costs for 
those units. 

The UMTA first approached the Board of 
Trustees last spring. Since that time, the 
tenants organization has gained momentum 
in the three complexes. 

If the cooperative becomes a reality, the 




UMTA believes it will not only save the 
University money but also return money to 
tenants at the end of each year in the form of 
rent rebates. The UMTA expects the 
cooperative will save on management costs 
by reducing the number of people involved in 
apartment administration. It also anticipates 
a saving on energy bills by mounting an 
energy conservation program. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1975 



Patriots at UMass 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1975 . 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 




Kicker John Smith says he's no seal, but bouncing a soccer 
ball about his body helps coordination. 




Offensive tackle* Allan Gallaher, left, and Leon Gray discuss 
a technique. 



rtedrHi 



lTnoutk 
Jeweler 



Jewelry Watches 

Fine China Silver 

Giftware 

Amherst, Mass. 
253-7bl5 



It took one minute on the New 
England Patriots' practice field this 
weekend to realize it's not all fun 
and games in pro football. For $23 a 
day, the 78 players still with the 
squad had the pleasure of working 
out, in full gear, during 104 degree 
temperatures. 

Off the field, the men were once 
again adjusting to that feeling only 
a celebrity knows: getting a good 
dose of "hero worship" from local 
youngsters who'd gladly trade a 
jJim Rice and Fred Lynn baseball 
card for an authentic autograph of 
a New England Patriot. 

In the chow hall, the players are 
being treated to some fine UMass 
hospitality. Food Director Art 
Warren has consistently prepared 
fine meals — with Patriots' money 
in abundance — and even served 
lobster and steak at the same meal 
Saturday evening. 

The Patriots will be here until 
Aug. 22 when they will return to 
Foxboro and its bustling life. 




Large Selection 
of 

STATIONERY and NOTES 

A. J. HASTINGS 

45 South Pleasant St., Amherst 



Number two draft choice Rodney Shoate does a quick run 
the dummies. 



over 



Amherst Motel 
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Route 9 — Opp. Zayre's 

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Furnished — Air-Cond. — Pool — Parking — All 
Utilities included — near shopping. 

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LEASE SEPT. to JUNE 76 



Jackson 
on 

Pinball 

wizard machines? 

by Kris Jackson 



The pinball machines are back, 
with their attendant dings, pops, 
chakka-chakkas, swears, grunts, 
kicks and revenues. The machines 
are all either new, or recently 
refurbished to the utmost in 
frustration. 

Trico Vendors of Northampton 
has been installing the machines a 
few at a time, causing an en- 
thusiastic tension in the crowd of 
the faithful each morning. As each 
machine is deployed, there begins 
the long period of breaking it in — 
letting the brand-new rubber 



Photos by 
George Withers 




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Conveniences which make BRANDYWINE 
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Large, partially enclosed, privete patios and 
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A seemingly quiet moment. 



Six year old Richie Lewis of Rolling Green is ecstatic about 
getting Mack Herron's autograph. 



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surfaces wear a little so the ball will 
respond with some measure of 
sanity when it strikes something, 
instead of careening off a bizarre 
angle and falling treacherously into 
some cleverly-concealed abyss. 

Trico Vendors has made a valient 
effort to UMass -- proff all of the 
machines, with double-duty heavy 
hasps on the changebox, and also 
on the back to prevent games from 
being registered manually on the 
mechanism. The result has been 
frenzied battering of the machines, 
especially by the younger set, with 
subsequent mechanical upset. 

The next major event is expected 
to be the display of Wizard, a 
machine of almost mystical im- 
plications. It is a direct spinoff of 
the movie Tommy, featuring Elton 
John and Ann-Margaret in glory in 
the artwork. A select few have 
tested this marvel. Bally has spared 
no expense to provide every gadget 
ever used on a machine, and a few 
never seen before. No one has 
beaten it consistently, if at all. It will 



either be a fantastic machine or an 
Edsel. Trico vendors, still con- 
ducting test runs on the machine, is 
optimistic. 

A surprise among the machines 
already in use is Big Shot, a drop- 
target machine. Its long flippers, a 
Bally trademark, can cover just 
about any bounce the cursed ball 
takes. Only the sides are really 
dangerous, and the Special is just 
about impossible to hit with a 
straight shot. Still, this machine can 
be beaten more consistently than 
any other by a skilled player who 
knows the machine's tricks. 

Another gem is Outer Space, the 
Gottleib classic. At first capricious 
and unbeatable because of its new 
rubber, this machine is — settling 
down to be a first- rate device. 

And, wonder of wonders. UMass 
is still to be a Mecca of pinball in the 
area because of the low prices. In 
contrast to just about everyone else 
on earth, games are still a dime 
apiece, three for a quarter. 



c 

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The students in the evening 
section .-of Astronomy 100 will 
conduct a public open house at the 
Amherst College Observatory The 
event will start at 9 p.m. on Friday, 
August 8 

The open house will feature a 
brief talk on the upcoming Perseid 
meteor shower, backyard constel- 
lation viewing and telescopic 
observation of star clusters and a 
newly discovered comet. 

In the event of cloudy skies, the 
open house will be held on the 
following evening, August 9. The 
observatory is located on a dirt road 
off Snell Street, near the in 
tersection of that street with 
Woodside Avenue 





Index '75 

put to bed 

After months of dedicated work, the 1975 edition of 
the Index was completed last week. The last pages of 
UMass' yearbook were sent to the printer on July 28, 
according to Index editor John Neister. The book will 
now take approximately twelve weeks to be proofed, 
printed, and shipped back to UMass. Neister an- 
ticipates distribution of the Index to students by mid 
— October, the same time at which last year's edition 
arrived. 

There will be several changes in the forthcoming 
Index, including a different placement of the senior 
section. "The fifty per cent of the students who start 
reading the book from the end will be surprised to see 
no senior photos at the end," Neister said. Instead, 
the senior section will be in the middle of the book, 
making its construction "much the same as any piece 
of prose." The Index staff felt that by placing senior 
photos in this manner, the book would have more 
impact and end on a higher note, Neister added. 

Index will include extensive art work, with every 
section of the book including at least one artist's 
work. Neister called the artwork "extremely 
professionally done," ranging from the opening color 
pages featuring Dario Politella and George Phillips to 
the credits hand written in Bookhand by Janice 
Rewak. 

The cover painting was done by Stuart Cudlitz, who 
also designed the spine motif. The motif is carried on 
through each section of the book, and represents "the 
growth of the University, the student, and in many 
ways the Index itself," Neister said. This year's book 
seems to be very "tight" and should be received well 
by the UMass student population, he added. 



- » 




THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 




• • * • • ♦ • • • '•••*•*» 




ummesbTme 

is just one big{ outing! 




Wednesday, August 6 
1.D0 to 6.00 p.m Afternoon bicycle 
trip to Montague. Meet in front of 
the Student Union. Bring a snack 
and water. 



Wednesday, August 6: 
5.-00 p.m. A beginning rock clim- 
bing trip to Rattlesnake Gutter. No 
experience necessary. Bring 
sneakers or boots and SO cents for 
gas. Meet et the Outing Club 
bulletin board beside the Student 
Union Ballroom. 



Thursday, August 7 
4:30 p.m. Outing Club trip: 
canoeing on the Deerfield River. No 
experience necessary. Meet et the 
Canoe Barn. See the Outing Club 
bulletin board beside the Student 
Union Ballroom for details. 

Friday, August 8 
3.O0 to 6.00 p.m. Bicycle trip to 
Sunderland. Meet in front of the 
Student Union. Bring a snack and 
water. 

Friday. August 8 to Sunday, 
August 10 

Outing Club trip: Androscoggin 
white water canoeing (Class 2 and 
3). See the Outing Club bulletin 
board for details. 

Tuesday. August 12 
1:00 to 6.00 p.m. Afternoon bicycle 
trip. Destination to be determined 
by trip participants. Meet in front of 
the Student Union. 



Lunch Hour Music 



The Summer Activities program 
will feature two music hours on the 
Campus Center Concourse this 
i/veek. 

On Wednesday, August 6 at 
12:00 noon. Todd Davis will play 
piano standards and blues. Davis, a 
self-taught pianist, played with 
many Worcester bands before 
moving to the Amherst area 
recently. 

At noon on Thursday, August 7; 
three members of the UMass voice 
faculty will perform selections 
ranging from Italian opera to 
Gershwin. 

The classical trio ensemble in- 
cludes soprano Dorothy Ornest, 
baritone Rodney Gisick and tenor 
Jon Humphrey. Their performance 
will include Mozart, Irish folk music, 
opera and Stephen Foster seiec- 
ions. 




Todd Davis 




The Oldest Grocery in Amherst 



Budweiser — 12 oi. — 5.75 case 

Munich — 12 oi. — 4.15 case 

Balentine Ale — 12 oi. — 5.55 case 

Heineken — 12 oi. — 14.95 case 

Wurlzbuger — 12 oz. — 14.00 case 

Guiness — 12 oz. — 14.95 case 

Foster Lager beer — 25 oz . — 1 1 .as case 

Ice (eleven pound bag) 

Charcoal — 181b. bag 

Fresh ground beef 

Minced Ham 

Beef Loaf 

Pot Roast 

Cubed Steak 

Kayem Kielbasa 



DAIRY 

Idolnof farm fresh milk 1.43 gal. 
Cabots Tripple score butter «?c 
Vermont Cheddar cheese l .49 lb 



1.45 six pack 

1.05 six pack 

1.39 six pack 

3.75 six pack 

3.59 six pack 

2.49 

.99 bottle 

50c 

1.29 

79c lb. 

1.191b. 
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PRODUCE 

Corn 29c dozen 
Watermelon 10c lb. 
Cabbage 15c head 
String beans 25c lb. 
Cantaloup 49c each 
Cucumbers 5c each 



71 1 Main St. Amherst 2 53- 5387 

On the Belchertown Bus Route 



Movies 
this 

Week 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6 S.U. 
BALLROOM 8:00 P.M. 
"THE PRIES TAND THE GIRL "' 

by Joaquim Pedro 
Based on a famous poem by 
Carlos Drummond de Andrade, this 
film by the director of 
"Macunaima" is a moving drama of 
two young people fighting against 
prejudice in a small village in the 
Brazilian country side. The film 
succeeds in revealing the same 
tortured struggle between sex and 
Catholicism familiar in the novels of 
Mauriac and Bernanos. A luminous 
film about the thwarted love of a 
beautiful girl for a priest in a remote 
country town. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 7 C.C. 
AUDITORIUM 8:00 P.M. 
"THE STORY OF A THREE DAY 
PASS" written and directed by 
Melvin Van Peebles. 

Van Peebles combines reality 
with stream of consciousness and 
impressionistic sequences in this 
history of a bittersweet love affair. 
The film follows a weekend 
romance between Turner, a black 
G.I. stationed in France, and 
Miriam, a white shopgirl. Turner 
later suffers demotion and 
restriction to base when his captain 
learns of the affair. The film is 
considered the first feature film 
ever made by a black American 
director. It was filmed in France in 
1967. 









local 






concerts 



(August 6-12) 

NRBQ i Forest — 4 Leaf Window (New Salem), Aug. 7, 8. 

Mitch Chakour and the Mission Band — 5th Alarm (Springfield), 
Aug. 6-10. 

Bonnie Reitt - Roomful of Blues — Shaboo Inn (Willimantic Ct.) 
Aug. 7, 8. 

James Montgomery — Shaboo Inn, Aug. 9. 

Widespreed Depression — Bernardaton Inn (Bernardston), Aug. 
8. 

Real Tears — Lazy River (Northampton), Aug. 7-10. 

Big Screamin' McGrew — Shea's Grove (Chicopee), Aug. 8, 9. 

Little Fire (Farewell Tourl - T.O.C. (UMass), Aug. 7-9. 

Freedom Jazz Ensemble — Chelsea House Cafe and Folklore 
Center (W. Brattleboro, Vt.), Aug. 8, 9. 

Widespread Depression — Lazy River, Aug. 12. 

Cricket Hill — Supermarket (Springfield), Aug. 7-9. 

Rocking Horse — Rusty Nail (Sunderland), Aug. 7-10. 

Aces Et Eights — Red Pantry (Belchertown), Aug. 7-9. 

Jac Veronesi - Lakeview Inn (Southwick), Aug. 10. 

Evergreen - Smith's Beach (Southwick), Aug. 7-9. 

Moon Over Miami — Steak Out (Amherst), Aug. 6-9. 

Jeremiah — Quicksilver (Amherst), Aug. 8, 9. 

Firewater — Supermarket, Aug. 6. 

Wheezer - Rusty Nail, Aug. 6. 

Winterwood Fire — Supermarket, Aug. 10. 

Tupelo - Red Pantry, Aug. 10. 

Maze — Supermarket, Aug. 12. 



( T indicates tix on sale at Ticketron in CC Hotel Lobby) 

SPRINGFIELD 
The Osmonds - Munch — Aug. 7, Civic Center T 
Seals Et Croft - Aug. 9, Civic Center T 
Miss World USA Pagent (with Bobby Hope) - Aug. 17 

LENOX, Mess. (Music Inn J all T 
Bonnie Raitt - Steve Goodman — Aug. 9 
Jerry Jeff Walker - David Bromberg — Aug. 16 
New Riders Of The Purple Sege — Aug. 30 

LENOX, Mass. (Tanglewood) all T 
Linda Ronstadt - Leo Kottke — Aug. 26 
David Crosby Et Graham Nash — Aug. 30 



discos 



Poor Richard's III (Amherst) — Open Nightly except Monday. 

Top Of The Campus (UMass) — Disco Night Every Wednesday. 

Rachid's (Hadley) - Open Nightly until 1 a.m. 

Maxwell's (Hadley) — Open Nightly, Jazz Night Every Sunday. 

Dial Tone Lounge (Hatfield) — Open Nightly until 1 a.m., Tuesday 
Night is Oldies Night. 

The Pub (Amherst) — Piccadily Discotheque Thursday through 
Sunday. 

September's (Chicopee) — Open Nightly. 

Fifth Alarm (Springfield) - Disco Nights Every Monday and 
Tuesday. 



e 
e 
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e 
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e 
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• 
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e 
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Feiffer's People 



Admirers of Jules Feiffer's 
cartoons are in for a treat. The 
Amherst Players Guild, Amherst's 
own community theater, will be 
performing the cartoonist's play 
Feiffer's People in Amherst High 
Schools outdoor courtyard on 
August 8 and 9. 





The play consists of a series of 
humorous vignettes which feature 
many of Feiffer's favorite 
characters and which take satiric air 
at numerous areas of human and 
social foolishness. Bernard 



Jenkins, Brian Prezalenski, Armand 
Dufrense, Judith Kay, Nick 
Leninger, Pam Jewel, Jon Levine, 
and Amy Neal. 

APG's production of Feiffer's 
People will begin at 8 p.m. on 
Friday and Saturday nights, August 
8 and 9. Since the play will be 
performed outdoors in Amherst 
High Schools grassy courtyard, the 
audience is encouraged to bring 

Mergendelier is there, along with blankets or cushions to sit on. 

his mother. Superman meets his Refreshments will be available. 

match in the form of a sweet young Tickets will be $1 at the door. For 

thing whom he rescues from a reservations or further information, 

mugger. A dancer interprets the call 253-5204. 

seasons in true Feiffer style. All in 

all, the production promises a 

summer evening of real dramatic 

interest. 

Feiffer's People, APG's second 

production since the group formed 

last winter, is being directed by 

Robert Stafursky and Larry Kim- " 

mel. Members of the acting 

company, most of whom play 

several roles, include Carolyn Wills, 

Mary Ann Kenney, Barbara 




Amherst Song Festival 



The Amherst Song Festival 
which is a series of recitals given 
concurrently with the Oren Brown 
Voice Seminar in late July and early 
August each summer is now en- 
tering its second week of recitals. 
The purpose of the recitals is to 
experiment with program materials 
and forms of presentation while 
offering young artists an op- 
portunity to enhance their skills by 
participating. 

The second week of the series 
includes a recital on Thurs., Aug. 7 
by Irene Gubrud, soprano. 

The Aug. 7th recital has 
programmed the "Funf Geistliche 
Leider" by C.P.E. Bach, Five Poems 
by Anna Akhnatova, Op. 27 by 
Prokofiev, a mixed group of songs 
by American composers two of 
which are "Rabbit at Top Speed" 
(from "La Bonne Cuisir.e") by 
Bernstein and "Who Wrote this 
Fiendish 'Rite of Spring'? by Henry 




Cowell. Her program ends with 
"Chants de Terre et de Ciel" by 
Olivier Messiaen. Miss Gubrud is 
accompanied by Martin Katz. 

The Festival is being held at 
Buckley recital hall, Amherst 
College, Amherst, Mass. Programs 
begin at 8:15 p.m. and are $2 
Tickets are available at the door. 



notice 



All events sponsored by Summer Activities are free 
to UMass summer students and fee paying conference 
participants. The general public will be admitted as 
space permits. 



wacw&i 



»' 



a 



"Post Civil War Girls and the 
American Nightmare", the last in a 
series of summer Bicentennial 
lectures, will be presented Thurs- 
day, August 12 at 2:00 p.m. in the | 
Student Union Colonial Lounge. 
The lecture will be given by Cynthia 
Wolff, professor of English at 
UMass. 

Wolff has written many articles 
and three books on subjects dealing 
with the English and American 
novel before 1914, American 
literature after the Civil War and 
feminist criticism, psychology and 
literature. 

Her books include Samuel \ 
Richardson and the Eighteenth I 
Century Puritan Character, Other] 
Lives, as well as the upcoming, A 
Feast of Words: The Fictions of\ 
Edith Wharton. 

The lecture is free and open t 
the public 



^ 



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<^s 



sS* 






The annual university Intramural Bicycle Race was held last Wednesday, July 30. It was a hot, 
muggy evening, but in spite of the weather, several participants peddled their way around the 1.7 mile 
course to the finish. The winner was Michael Zibit, with a record breaking time of 3:59:5, passing the 
previous record of 4:21:8 by 22 seconds. 

Student Union Gallery 






The paper is too smooth. The paper is too rough. 
These aren't really the right kind of tools. My back 
hurts. There's no art audience around here, anyway. 
I'm out of pencils. I've lost my eraser. I don't have any 
time to get these things done. My chair is too low. My 
back hurts. There's not enough light. It's too nice a 
day to do any work. My chair is too high. It's too hot. 



It's too cold. There's too much light. My pencils aren't 
sharpened. My paint is too wet. My back hurts. 
OBJECTION ABLES 

Some Things I Aint Showed You (Don't Look Too 
Close). 

A show by Don Milliken at the Student Union 
Gallery_ Aug, 3.9c 



POOR RICHARDS III 



presents 

LILITH 

e 

A WOMEN'S BAND 

Featuring a dynamite horn section! 

Rock, soul and oldies 

August 6, 13, 20 - Every Wednesday 
only $1 

256-8284 
Belchertown Road 




Rte. 9 

434 Russell St 

At The Arco 

Station Next To 

Campus Plaza 

256-0107 



Are you getting ripped off? 

Check out our prices and see if you are paying m 
than you should be for name brand soda. 
16oz. PEPSI $125 six pack 
12 oz. cans COKE $1.65 8 pack 

COTT quarts 38c each 

7-up— 16 oz. — $1.25 six pack 

We carry returnables 

We carry a full line of Regular and Diet Soda 

NAME BRANDSODAAT DISCOUNT PRICES. 
"WE ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS" 




ore m 






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WEPNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, AUGl 



W.E.B. DuBois l TOWNEHOUSE 

a prominent place in history 



of Amherst 



by Rob Melacasa 

The University of Massachusetts 
Press will publish the complete 
papers of Dr. W.E.B. DuBois, 
according to Mrs. Leone Stein, 
director of the press. 

Dr. William Edward Burgnadt 
DuBois (pronounced Du Boyce) 
was born in Great Barrington, Ma. 
in 1868. Twenty six years later he 
launched a career which would 
ensure him a permanent place in 
American and Black history; 
mediator between two cultures — 
the dominant white society and the 
separate black community. 

He has been described as an 
historian, a sociologist, and a Negro 
Nationalist, but a complete 
biography would have to include 
portrayal of him as a poet, novelist, 
and public speaker; author of some 
forty books, and several hundred 
articles and pamphlets; one of the 
founders and officers of the 
National Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People, and 
editor of their magazine. The Crisis, 
for 26 years; socialist and com- 
munist; scholar and teacher, he is 
without doubt one of the greatest 
and most important American 
Blacks. 

Now, twelve years after his 
death, the University has acquired 
Dr. DuBois' principle correspon- 
dence and unpublished works 
through the efforts of the 
University Press and Chancellor 
Randolph W. Bromery. 

The collection was originally 
offered to Harvard, but was turned 
down due to some question 
regarding the qualifications of the 
editor and then custodian, Herbert 
Apthecker. 

The University Press is also partly 
responsible for bringing Mrs. 
Shirley Graham DuBois to the 
University of Mass. as a guest 
lecturer, which led to the purchase 
of the collection by the University 
as well as the rights of publication. 
At a lecture on bookpublishing 
Monday night at Herter Hall, Mrs. 
Stein said she expected the set to 
run seven volumes in length. 
Volume one has already been 
published, and the second volume 
will be on the University Press' fall 
list. 

In addition the National En- 
dowment for the Humanities (NEH) 
has made a grant of $69,942 to the 
University to support its efforts to 
organize, describe, catalog and 
make available to the University 
community the Papers of Dr. 
DuBois 

According to Dr. Ronald Berman, 
chairman of the NEH, the grant 
reflects the Endowment's concern 
for making important collections 
available for scholarly use. 
Specifically, the grant will support 
the microfilming of the collection, 
as well as the deep indexing 
necessary for its accessibility. The 
library hopes that other repositories 
of DuBois letters may allow the 
inclusion of their holding in the 




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UMass DuBois collection. This 
would permit the creation of a 
master index and inventory of all 
DuBois correspondence. 

In preparation for the indexing 
and filing procedure, the papers are 
now undergoing extensive treat- 
ment at the New England 
Document Center in North An- 
dover. Between one quarter and 
one third of the collection has been 
deacidified, repaired, and 
strenghtened. 

Well before the work is com- 
pleted for the entire collection, the 
University library expects to have 
engaged a manuscripts processor 
who will do the work of arranging 
and describing the collection. 
Principle investigator under the 
NEH grant is John Kendall, 
bibliographer for American Studies 
at the University library. The 
collection resides in its own room 
on the top floor of the University 
library, and the archival processing 
is directly supervised by archivist 
Katherine Emerson. 

The acquisition of the DuBois 
papers will be of great benefit to the 
University community, and is a 
tribute to a man who did so much 
to promote the Black experience in 
America. 




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round hardwood ijblrs framed pic 



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both the Sirloin Strip dinner, and the T-Bone Steak dinner. 




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featuring savings on: 

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Biggest Savings This Summer!! 



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We want used equipment for the fall and we are offering the best trade in value in our 
history — see Bruce at the Amherst Store. 



SUMMER HOURS 
Mon. - Thurs. 10-6 
Fri. 10-9 
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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



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Quarter pound^ 

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Our kitchen people toss 9 different garden salads and 4 
hearty "main dish" salads What a variety for summer! 

Chicken, Ham 
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by Mike "Koor Narp 

Noorna Na Noor Nop" 

Kostek II 

One Size Fits All 
FRANK ZAPPA & THE MOTHERS 
OF INVENTION 

(DiscReet DS 2216) time 42:44 
Ok, Frank's always said he makes 
music that he wants to hear, and if 
anyone else wants to listen, ok. I 
must say though, that that does let 
him off a lot of lists of Culpability. 
Now he's always had the ability, 
but never has his music been so 
aimless, limited, facile, transparent 
and popular as his current 
DiscReet-leaning band. 

Oh, it's all clever, tricky, catchy 
and sharply-played as hell, but 
there was a time when FZ was 
about as important as could be. 
He's still good, but now the culture 
he seems to be feeding off of is not 
that of TV dinners by the pool or 
Lonesome Cowboy Burt, through 
the heart, but rather the instant 
emptyness of McDonald's and 
TVee, and Zappa's laying it not to 
waste. Oh, so sad. For the time 
being anyway, touring has made 
Frank normal. Or about as normal 
as he could get, anyway. Cplus. 



Metamorphasis 
ROLLING STONES 
(ABDCO ANA V time 41:05 

This is a careless money package 
tossed off by Allen Klein, one of the 
biggest pigs in the music BIZniz 
(He'll probably sue me...). Con- 
sidering the utter lack of historical 
liner notes (much more attention is 
spent of hawking a $5.00 tee shirt 
of the strikingly non-cover— it 
doesn't cover anything) and refusal 
to cooperate with the Stones in 
shaping the tunes (Bill Wyman says 
there's better stuff in the can) make 
this the obvious bastard offspring 
of Klein's court settlement with the 
group. 

All of which has nothing to do 
with music, only money. There's no 
excuse for this so-so bunch of 
demo tapes (a sort of long-range 
companion to The Basement 
Tapes) to be so shoddily presented. 
Biminus. 







In The Beginning 
ROY BUCHANAN 
(Polyoor PD 6035) time 33:44 
This is as bad as you heard it 
was. Until Roy ditches his pinetar 
band (they're stuck) that drags him 
down, his magic imagination soul 
guitar will remain shamefully ob- 
scured. Dplus. 



0> 



Sex Machine Today 
JAMES BROWN 
I Poly dor PD 604?) time 41:45 
No one is better suited by the 
disco boom than Mr. Soul himself, 
as he's been bumping off this stuff 
for year upon year. Nobody can 
turn it and burn it like J.B., and Sex 
Machine Today is long on stomp 
and short on melody. But, if you 
want to do it, this shoots through 
and through it. B. 







Metal Machine Music 
LOU REED 
(RCA CPU- 1 101) time 64:04 or 
forever 

King-sized karate chop to the 
rock neck is this, the only real new 
music issued by a Commercial 
artiste besides John & Yoko. 
Unfortunately, this will certainly, 
like J&Y's ripping stuff, be mass- 
ively ignored. Those that do get 
themselves a snoottul of this rock & 
roll noise XXCVTFRRRR + $TR!m- 
mopl per cent noise may just not 
get back. "One of the strongest 
albums ever released anywhere." 
— Kostek, Summer Collet, an. A. 



10 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



— WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1975 



G.S.E.O.C. 

On Thursday, July 31, the 
GSEOC (Graduate Student Em- 
ployees Organizing Committee) 
held their weekly meeting. The 
GSEOC is a group of concerned 
graduate student employees who 



Bits 



AMHERST CHINESE FOOD 

62 Man St., Amnerat 

Tel» 253-7835 

EAT IN OR TAKE-OUT 

LUNCH SPECIALS 99< & up 



FBUIHI WEEK 

W Sat. at 7:00 and 9 00 

THE CLOWNS 

and 
Paul Mazurky's 

Alex in Wonderland 

with Donald Sutherland as 
Fellini 

SUN.-TUES. 

Q lOb 0586 0935 
27 Pleasant St., Northampton 



are working at forming a union for 
all T.A.'s, R.A.'s, and S.A.'s. 

The major part of the meeting 
was devoted to a discussion of 
organizing. The Committee 
presently has representatives in 
twenty departments. Many 
graduate students have expressed 
support for a union that would be 
responsive to their needs and 
grievances. The Committee is 
therefore interested in having as 
much feedback as possible from 
graduate student employees to 

numi 



* *AT ' 

OF SMITH COLLEGE 



ODEMtf 



develop a truly democratic policy. 

In addition to increasing contact 
among graduate student em- 
ployees in departments across 
campus, the GSEOC is also con- 
tinuing legal research and contacts 
with unions at other universities. 

The combination of the freeze, 
budget cuts and possible tuition 
increases directly affects all gradate 
student employees, and, in turn, 
the undergraduates that they serve. 



SAC 



AMHERSTO** 



Air Conditioned 
Amity St 2S3-542* 



GENE WILDER 



-OUACKSER 
FORTUNE 

HASA 
COUSININ 
THE 
BRONX" 



.os 



Charhc Chaplin in 



MOUERN TIMES 



Eves modern times 7 30 
Quachser Fortune 9 00 



M0N 1 TUES ALL SCATS $1.00 




SAC (Student Action Com- 
mittee) is sponsoring an organizing 
conference on student unionization 
this coming weekend, August 8th 
through 10th at the University. 

Everyone interested in working 
for change in the University who 
wants to talk about building a 
student union is welcome to 
participate. 

For more information, contact 
545-2415 during the day and 367- 
2613 in the evening. 




MOUNTAIN FARMS FOUR 



Reincarnation 

Reter 

Proud 



Michael Sarraan JenrvtarONafl 

Sun thru Thori J 00, 4.00, •:«•; TWi-lllor 
VM 8 *00. 

Fri. 4 Sat. 2:00, 4:4$, TOO, ♦:!$; Twi-liter 
.4.13-4:41. 



5QA Q1RQ MOUNTAIN FARMS MALL 
OH-3I3J ROUTE 9-HAOlfV MASS 



V 



The story of a small- town ] 
girl who wanted to be a 
big-time movie star. 



OFTMf lOCUST" 



Will! AM ATHEftTOM 



K 



il 



The 



find 
Ttel 

.___ SeanConnery 

0i_ \ Son thru Thur*. 2:00, S4S, • 00, Twi liter 
l<PGj J: 15-5:4$. 
Fri. ft Sat. 7 00. 4:45. 7:00, 0:1$; Twi liter 
4:15-4:45. 



Sun thru Thwrs. 1:00, 7 50, No Twi-llter 

Fri. 4 *•!. 1:00, 5: IS. •: JO ; Twi-Mter 4:4$-$: IS. 



WALT MSNE V PRODUCTIONS' 

One of our - __ 
„ Dinosaurs \ ps> 
m is Missing Y-& 

PETTR USTINOV HELEN HAVES m 

[Ago, "CIWWELU" 

Sun. thru Thur*. J: 00, 3:30. 4:15, «oo, Twi- 
liter 5:45-4:15. 

i^rsv^-' ,:4 -- s:,s ' '-- •*" t -«- 




ROOMMATE WANTED 

F roommate wanted for 2 bdrm 
Townhouse »70. Call Ann 649 1347 

Roommate needed, own room 
$90 mo. Belchertown Linda 323- 
6637. 

2 F wantad for 3 bdrm, apt in 
iPuff. VII. »86 mo., heat inc. Call 
.703 660 2632 collect Aak for Dabra 
'or coma to 221 Puff ton between 18 
p.m. aftar Aug. It. 

RESPONSIBLE ~M~F~ ROOM- 
MATE. Own room in furniahad 3 
bdrm Townhouee Busline pool 
tennis, air condltionad, $110 In- 
'7967** Utl,itlM No '•••• Bo "* 2*3 

V **■*£ | ^^V >\^ 
f 



AU J° S _ F ?* * A iA 

Fiat 124 wag. 69 excellent 
mechanical cond. 26 mpg $700. 263 
3661. 

64 VW bug. Complete car, 1300 cc 
angina, apart, for porta or to 
rebuild 160. 266-0644. 

67 VW bug. Haa 1600 cc angina, 
partially apart, naads rlnga and 
piatona. For parte or fix it. BO 266- 
0644. 



69 Flat 860 Spyder convertible 
with 71 angina. 42 mpgl Naw 
exhaust plus spare angina 4 parts 4 
radial snow tiros, raal cuta. I860 
firm. 263-9667. Joyce. 



1966 Chrysler 4 dr. 
7967 




Bob 263- 



71 Vaga. immaculata, 40,000 
miles. 30 mpg. Three spaad stan- 
dard, only $1196. 263-7967. 

68 Paugot 403, sunroof, naads 
battery 4100 driva It away. Bob 263- 
7967 



CtaUlfyxU 



LOST 

Lost Puffers pnd Aug~3sl7va7, 
Amathyat ring. Sentimental value 
Reward. 263-2842. 

WANTEd" 

The Boltwood Belchertown 
Project is a nonprofit student org 
working for tho roaldanta of 
Belchertown State School Wo 
need donations of saleable items 
for a flaa market to fund our 
programs. Please call 684 1909 or 
2568780. 

SERVICES 

The outback automotive repair 
specializing In SAAB and other 
fore ign care, call -367-2600. 

RPOM WANTED 

Room In a house wanted. Single, 
up to $100 mo., incl. utilities 
female senior, reliable, friendly' 
neat, etc. June 263-6467 or 646-0861 



^••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••*^J 

J BELL'S PIZZA HOUSEJ 

* * 

* 65 UNIVERSITY DRIVE * 

: * 

* CSm? ' ( Grinders * 

l JfflK GREAT J 

* y^Wil/ Food J 
» t^h^ V^ijaliliii sensibly priced. * 

* Imisl To Taste Us is to Love Us! * 

^ ^■hMaaT ^^ 

^^ Call 256-8011 For Fast Service. J 

*••••*••••••*••••*••*••**••••••••••# 

* 



* 
* 
* 
* 



* 
* 
* 

* 



TENNIS 



t Dunlop Fort 

5 RACKET 



Dozen 

TENNIS 
BALLS 

Bancroft 
Player's 

Special 

PDP 

OPEN 
RACKET 




Reg. 
$37.00 



Reg. 
$25.00 



Reg. 
$27.00 



Reg. 
$47.00 



* 



3? 







All Warm-Up Suits 



* 
* 

t 

* 

» 
* 
* 

* 



3or« 



OOff 



linusr nf Walsh, lur. t 



♦ 32 Main St.. Amherst u-ajoi 



532-3361 




RIDE WANTED 

To Chicago or Madison around 
Aug. 8. Will share •♦• and driving. 
686-4188, Michael. 

FOR SALE 



HELP WANTED_ _ 

SPANISH ENGLISH Blllnguala 
needed for a psychology ax 
perlment. It la a 6 day experiment 
Ian hour a day) and It paya $12. If 
intaraatad. call 646-2787. 



Woman'e 10 opaad, excellent 
cond. #100. 263-3881. 

TENNIS 

For oala — one Dunlop Fort 
tennla racket with Blue Star etrlnga 
and Moody grip. Used only twice. 
Call Alan at 263-3707 or 646-0617 

I M E .P_ A _*I 0M ?. 

24 YEAR OLD man naado a homo 
for Sept. Rural house with friendly 
stable people aought to share 
interests (redlcel politics. Jazz). 
work, end expenaea. Neat, a good 
cook, and a non-smoker. Own cer. 
Cell 617-621 0636 after 6 or write 
Steve Shulmen, 406 Centre St., 
Jemeice Plain. MA 02130. 



FOR_RENT_ 

Belchertown near lake. Fur- 
nished 3 bedroom house on UMass 
bua route. No peta. Eddy 323-4683 
or 1-269-4264. 

Room available In Puffton. Rent 
♦86. Call peraon to person for 
Mertha 617-633-8087. 







*w-4/w%~~t/v 



| WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1975. 

ac. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



by Johnny hsut 



7 ^ 

&BT "KEAPe/^ 
<SKAMP'" 




^^Wt 



THE WIZARD OF ID 



by Brant p.rk.r and Johnny hart 




FEIFFER 



epos CCWL&TOPIl}' 
H&tl CDULP KILL- MM- 



X TURD 0)*MAUPe rk5R rttS- 

virft folk couple igmpcR 

TrC LNJ6H TRAOT «fer5AMS. 



mv ycweesT &&, out a* her. 

FIRST Rtl&KMT HOME- 8VOeV»J. 

im vac um ujorr^. r cava? 






Be5r:'His vouhx&t &rl,out 

S? &£VeU fiC8£RT VCU)6 JS 




MV HUS&AUP 6€T$. CHlS FfiOH 
HIS 000666 Sbtt\mtL MV 

so) utoiTser a ha/rcot, mv 
figs, ujFgax cyiy & & 

IT5 A . 

siruATiaJ 

GOHei7V. 



7HAJJK 60V 

for Tve 

\ 



riiMNniNrtflHxii' 117* 




©rt^-itf? 



t-K? 




HO0 ELS6 

uxxxc I 

|cMjJ7r£ 
PAID r3 



Kris Jackson 



(gosh eooC 

1 1 ftlN'T UP 
jFERTHINKW 

VOU GON' 



LITTU r LIZARD, 
X AM AVaJXARD, 
CAPABtE or 
8£IN EVERV- 
UHERE AT 
THE SAME 



(f\HH ... Df\T ft 
f\CAL FINE 
PtATITDOB, 

golden eoy, 8UF] 

US PSAROS AN 

STUFF, UE GONNA 

AMSS yOUDRffUfafi 

US 



B£ yOUR OWN 
AOTHOft,TflK£ 

^joua oun nap- 

PtCKtK <N HNtC 
RiOtWOftOUN 
K/^D-PDrtON 
OCfTZ THAT'S 
WHAT4DI0 



and Pieces 




Credit Union 
recruits 



The U. Mass. Student Federal 
Credit Union is accepting ap- 
plications for positions of 
responsibility in the Credit Union. 
These positions are open to all 
students, graduates included, of all 
disiplines. Applications may be 
obtained in the Student Credit 
Union Office (166 CO and ap- 
plications must be filed by August 
19. 

The Student Credit Union is 
operated by volunteers only, 
however the majority of these 
volunteers have arranged academic 
credits for their efforts. 

For further information stop in or 
call the Student Credit Union at 
545-1994. Note: For summer open 
Tuesdays and Fridays only. 

Hypnosis 

The Psychical Awareness and 
Research Association announces 
an up-coming week-end workshop 
course in Hypnosis and 
Self-Hypnosis. 

It will be held at the UMass 
campus beginning with a Friday 
evening session on August 8th, 
extending the full days on Saturday 
and Sunday, August 9th and 10th. 

The leader of the course will be 
Gerald Sullivan, Founder and 
Director of Hypnotic Associates 
Institutes of Hypnosis. Mr. Sullivan 
completed internship at the Drug 
Dependent Institute of Yale 
University, has had training in 
Transactual Analysis and is a 
graduate of the New England In- 
stitute of Hypnosis. In addition, Mr. 
Sullivan is also engaged in a full 
time office practice. 

For furthe. information and 
details and registration, please 
contact Mrs. Claudette Kiely, 105 
Batchelor St., Granby or evenings, 
call Carole Barrett Tel: 586-0122 
Northampton. 

Playoffs 
in gear 



All participants in tennis, squash, 
paddleball, handball and badminton 
are requested to conclude all (of 
their matches by Thursday August 
7, 1975). 

Playoffs in tennis will start im- 
mediately upon conclusion of the 
original schedules. For information 
call the Intramural Office at 545- 
2801 or 545-2693. 




Lavender 
Grapevine 

Gay social events are happening 
this weekend and next in the 
Amherst area. 

Picnic!! this Saturday, August 9, 
at the Quaker Meeting House, Rte. 
63, Leverett. Bring food, gay spirit, 
good feelings. Starts at noon until 
5. Sponsored by Pioneer Valley Gay 
Union. 

Dance to disco at Farley Lodge! 
Next Friday. August 15, from 9 p.m. 
to 1 a.m. We're going to make this 
one event better than the last. 
Refreshments will be served, but 
you are invited to bring your own 
too! Sponsored by People's Gay 
Alliance and Gay Women's Caucus. 
Bisexual Women's Rap Group 
meets every Monday in August (the 
11th, 18th, and 25th), at 7:30 p.m. 
CC803. We will continue into the 
fall, so it's not too late to join! 

Gay Teens will have an 
organizing meeting August 14th, in 
CC 178 at 7:30 p.m. Renee is 
putting it together, so for all the 
details see her in the People's Gay 
Alliance office at S.U. 413. 

People's Gay Alliance is meeting 
tonight at 7:30 p.m., in CC 903. We 
will have general business, talk, and 
so on. Please cornel 

Drums and 
Bugles 

Five top senior division drum and 
bugle corps will fill an August night 
with entertainment, this summer, 
during the 4th annual Super Bowl 
of Music at the University of 
Massachusetts-Amherst. 

Each corps will perform the 
precision maneuvers so important 
to its rank. Each will make it look 
easy. 

Tickets are $4, $3, and $2. Ad- 
vance ticket requests can be mailed 
to Joseph E. Sexton, Room 236 
Whitmore Hall, UMass, Amherst - 
01002, or Springfield Area Ticket 
Information, c-o Foley Insurance, 
120 Maple St., Springfield, Mass., 
telephone 736-5032 evenings 736- 
2464. 



INTE/tMlJlQALS 



SIMMER 1975 

MEN'S SOFTBALL 

FINAL STANDINGS 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



TEAM 

1. "DD2H" 

2. Uranus 

3. FlpefitCers 

U. Captain Crunch 



WON 

7 
7 
6 
5 



LOST 



1 
2 
2 



In Playoffs 



5. Rolling Green 

6. Immorrill 

7. Beta Kappa Phi 

8. Moskins 

9. Economics 
10. Tsunamis 



5 
u 
2 
2 
1 




TEAM 

1. Frank's Flunkies 

2. COINS 

3. Roger's Dodgers 

4. Midnight Ashcans 



3. Grave Robbers 

6. Beavers 

7. Uncle John's Band 

8. Education 

9. Sub 1 liners 
10. Grantlings 



AMERICAN 


LEAGUE 


LOST 




WON 




7 




I 




6 




2 




6 




2 




5 




2 


In Playoffs 


5 




3 




5 




3 




2 




6 




2 




6 




2 




6 









8 





12 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1975 



Collegian Comments 



Initial Encounter 



— by E. Patrick McQuaid 



SILENT, COLD, INTELLECTUAL 
TYPE (so he thought himself to be) 
reader of Nietzsche, quoter of 
Kafkian quip, three piece tweed 
suit, the whole bit, unblemished 
umbrella to aid his stride, brown 
leather brief case by his side, en- 
tered the Student Union, Union of 
Students, Department of Student 
Unity, Administrative Committee 
for the Prevention of the 
aforementioned poor excuse for 

one anyway. 

Pseudointellectualwhitecollared 
firstdayonthejobimitationbureaucra 
ttrademarkedcoDVwrittenadozentim 
esovernineteenseventyfive. 

Clean shaven, pink necked 



adolescent; sickly pale com- 
plexion; unwanted though 
someone had brought him into the 
world, this world, with some degree 
of love. The boot of society hadn't 
crushed him like some roach; she 
wouldn't let them. She nursed him, 
suckled him on tired, shrunken, 
wrinkled breasts; her blood his 
blood; invertebrate heel; made it to 
the top (so he thought). 

Sharp left, up the steps and 
down that long corridor of endless 
initials. New job with the Office of 
Higher Ideals, Department of 
Advanced Ideology; infiltrate the 
student government; the SGA; but 
first to locate the office. 



Wrong door, RSO, three letters 
though. 

"Looking for SGA," he pleaded. 

"One of those doors down 
there.. .think its on your left." 

"Thanks ever so much!" Click- 
click-click; MDC, no that's not it, on 
the right anyway; click-click-click; 
LSO, no, no, 'fraid not; click-click- 
click; MUA, ungh-ungh; click-click- 
click; Let's see: PNS, SNC, JON, 
BNS, BMCP, hhmmm too many 
initials, nope; click-click-click; 
Ahhhh VCCA, nahhh, looks like I'm 
well into the four letter section 
now. Better check down this 
corridor here: click-click-click: SOP, 
AIB, FOP, hhmm what's this? 



Faculty Organizing Project... never 
heard of such a thing; click-click- 
click; SBA, ahhh, guess not, close 
though, let's see; click-click-click; 
SS, damn, I'm down to two letters, 
I'll continue down here aways 
more; click-click-click; MEN...ahh, 
oh, yes, perhaps I should, no I can 
wait; click-click-click; SHL, GWC; 
click-click-cl; ohhh I've practically 
worn down this heel; click-shhh- 
click; Ahhhl SGAI 'Bout timel 

Three successive, well timed, 
planned and thought out knocks on 
the engraved door. No response. 
Encore. Repeat performance. (No, 
but I read the book). 

"Ahh, hello? Hello in there? 



Anyone?" 

"What is it?" 

"Might I come in?" 

"Whaddya want?" 

"Ahh, I'm from the 
FIOOCBCOI (PTTLV)..." 

"The what?" 



SD- 



Great Moments in Govt *f (m f «*smt) 




norih 



Springfield ?... Amherst?... Vtait's tk difference ? Same 'hick' 
towns/ Parks to Lacy Benson at cabinet wetting. 

-June 12, I97J- 



T 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



"The Special Department for 
Investigation of on campus 
Bureaucracy Concentrating on 
Initials (Particularly the Three Letter 
Varieties: dot dot dot." 

"You certainly took your time. 
Enter!". 

He straightened his tie and 
proceeded to enter the office. 
Stepping through he pivoted his 
body so that his back was to the 
room and closed the door as quietly 
as possible. To his surprise its echo 
was extremely loud. He turned to 
face the receptionist. 

He stopped; hat half off his head 
on a tilt; lips frozen in the first 
sylable formation of "Hello"; his 
brief case slipped from his hand and 
resounded throughout the empty 
room; a room the size of a football 
field. 

Pulling his senses together, he 
scanned the enormous chamber. 
On everyside could be seen the 
reversed initials engraved on the 
countless doors that bounded the 
spacious room. 

"RSO, MDC..." he began to 
mumble, "LSO, PNS, DDT, SOB, 
even MEN. ..No, no, this can't, just 
simply can't..." He focused his 
attention in the direction of noise 
emerging i from the only object in 
the room. 

In the center of the hall rested a 
small teletype machine, its keys 
banging away furiously. He 
squinted and read aloud: "ITT". 

He cleared his throat a dozen or 
more times while slowly walking 
towards the machine. The sound of 
its hammering grew louder and 
louder. The yellow paper ejecting 
from it began to pile itself neatly on 
the floor aside itself. 

A thought crossed his mind; a 
daring, revolutionary thought. Kick 
out the plug; cut the cables, push 
the machine over! 

But no, it was not possible. The 
system was fastened securly to the 
floorboards, There were no plugs, 
no ins, no outs to this system. It 
was infallible. 



You can't fight City Hall 



It is August now. The Freshmeri have been 
processed and fed into the computer; now 
they wait, half fearfully, half longingly, for 
their Adventure in Learning to begin in 
September. The faculty are beginning to 
trickle back into town after their summers in 
London, Montevideo, Teheran, willing but 
not ready to face yet another year in 
academia. All over the Commonwealth, 
those who have found summer employment 
give notice to their employers, and those - 
who found no work count the days until the 
dormitories open. 

In the dog days of August we tend to 
forget what the University is really like. Even 
those of us who have spent the summer here 
don't really remember the peculiar flavor of 
this institution when it is operating at full 
efficiency. In the summer its resources are 
not sufficiently taxed to allow their true 
personality to show through; each office, 
each department, each "administrative unit" 
is merely lying dormant, waiting for the Fall 
to bring back the students, the raw material 



by which it may display its artistry. 

There is work going on durjng the sum- 
mer, to be sure, but it is mere busy-work, 
puzzle solving that must be done in order 
that the true purposes of the University 
might be allowed to transpire without an- 
noying delay. 

The true purpose of the University is, of 
course, to bewilder. A visitor from a foreign 
land, observing the operations of the 
University, could come to no other con- 
clusion. We are not here to learn from books, 
or practice, or even professors. We are here 
to learn that we cannot beat the system. We 
are told, throughout our collegiate careers, 
that there is no use in struggling against the 
inevitable. We are no better than those 
microscopic organisms who live out their 
miserable lives on a glass slide, vainly trying 
to escape the inquisitive gaze of the in 
vestigator. 

it is not that there are evil men in power, 
seeking to impress upon us their evil ways. 
The mentality of the University is somehow 



larger than any one of its constituent parts; 
the whole is indeed greater than the sum of 
its parts. 

We burden our higher-level administrators 
with a terrible truth, one which they must 
hide at all costs, even from themselves. They 
are the ones who know just how accurate are 
those signs which proudly proclaim "WE 
ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE". The plain fact of 
the matter is that no one is responsible here; 
no one has control of this University. 

The average student, who only wants to 
get out of here with himself and his degree 
intact, only comes into contact with this lack 
of human control when he tries to comply 
with the endless paperwork of any well-run 
bureaucracy, this one in particular. It is then 
that he receives applications in the mail two 
days after the deadline for their return or, 
most humiliating of all, finds that the 
University has "no record" of his money, his 
six semesters of attendance, or his existence. 
How does one fight City Hall when City Hall 
will not even acknowledge one's existence? 



-by Bryan Harvey 



I was at one of those little windows in 
Whitmore today, the windows at which you 
can see your whole life flash before your eyes 
as the otherwise charming person at the desk 
behind looks up and says "I'm sorry but..." 
This window had two signs tacked up above 
it, both written in the same hand, both pf 
apparently equal age. One said that such- 
and-such had to be received by 11:00 a.m. 
Monday, while the other stated that the very 
same thing had to be received by Monday 
noon. Obviously, the only purpose behind 
such authoritative yet conflicting notices is 
to remind us that we are merely mortals, and 
that there are many things we are not meant 
to understand. 

I suppose there are those who would call 
me ungrateful and ungracious. Such an 
education will be very useful in later life. It 
will probably keep more than one of us out of 
jail. After all, the people who are in charge of 
this world don't like it to be known that they 
are as confused as we are. 




-^^* 



School of Ed 

After $11,500 and five months, the In- 
ternationally acclaimed accounting firm 
of Coopers and Lybrand has completed a 
preliminary report that* shows at least one 
person to have gained personal wealth 
through Ed School fund misuse. The five- 
member Visiting Committee's report is 
also reviewed. See page 2 

State -wide lobby 

Student leaders from state schools 
across Mass. gathered recently "and 
decided to band together and stage a 
massive state-wide lobby against tuition 
hikes and Impending budget cuts. State 
Rep. James Collins offered his en- 
dorsement to the Sept. 17 rally. See page 4. 



o^ M ^ 



# 




i863 



Fine Arts Center 

UMass has poured over $16 million into 
the construction of the new Fine Arts 
Center, however lighting and audio 
equipment have yet to be installed. Two 
Arts Council officials say that the state 
Bureau of Building Construction is 
withholding $650,000 earmarked for the 
equipment. See page 5. 

Summer Sounds 

A review of The Album of the Sound- 
track of the Trailer of the Film of Monty 
Python and the Holy Grail as well as 
reviews of some of the more outstanding 
album releases during the summer, with a 
critique of the book Fear of Flying are on 
the Review pages. See pages 14, 15 



TL 



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id School Reports 



Coopers and Ly brand: hands were in the till 



by Dan LaBonte 

At a cost of $11,500, and after 
five months of evaluating the fiscal 
and administrative procedures and 
controls of the UMass School of 
Education, the international ac- 
counting firm of Coopers and 
Lybrand has completed a 
preliminary report with at least one 
conclusion that finds personal gain 
through diversion of certain Ed 
School funds "may have occurred 
in a number of instances," ac- 
cording to UMass President Robert 
Wood. 

In reference to the possible 
misuse of funds, "any firm con- 
clusion must of course await the 
action by the grand jury and the 
subsequent adjudication of any 
indictment which may be for- 
thcoming," Wood said in a 
memorandum issued to the UMass 
board of trustees concerning the 
accounting firm's report. 

"However one tentative in- 
ference that can be drawn from the 
preliminary audit material is that 
diversion of funds for personal gain 
may have occurred in a number of 
instances, apparently involving only 
one individual," he added. 

Wood said in the memo that he 



cannot specify exact amounts of 
fund misuse in anticipation of the 
current federal grand jury in- 
vestigation, and since "appropriate 
authorities are in possession of 
certain grant and fund records. 

Wood indicated the total amount 
of fund misuse to be only a "small 
part" of the total budgets, in excess 
of the $2.7 million in audited grants. 

"Obviously, any amount misused 



number of years School of Ed 
members were allowed, as a matter 
of policy, to abuse or bypass 
altogether certain operating 
procedures which generally 
"resulted in poor management of 
available funds and poor judgement 
in their use rather than in actual 
misappropriation." 

Although Wood found it 
reassuring that the amount of funds 



— establishment of higher levels 
of approvals including in certain 
cases, the Chancellor and the 
President; 

— requirement of double 
signatures on all authorizations for 
payments and other financial 
commitments; 

— establishment of proper 
approval mechanism for initial 
budget and for any subsequent 



tt 



'...diversion of funds for personal gain may have occured in a number 
of instances, apparently involving only one individual. 



»» 



- Robert Wood 



is intolerable, and we are 
cooperating fully with law en- 
forcement agencies in following 
this up," he stated. 

A second conclusion Wood drew 
from the firm's preliminary report is 
that the "management of grants 
and contracts to the School of Ed 
was poor," which lead to many 
expenditures based either on 
inadequate documentation, 
unauthorized signatures, or 
changes in budget categories 
without prior authorization from the 
funding agency. 

Wood also noted that for a 



apparently diverted for personal use 
was limited, he was disturbed over 
the "substantial potential for 
misuse." As a result of the auditors 
findings, their recommendations 
concern strengthening ad- 
ministrative procedures, particularly 
in the area of grant and contract 
administration. 

The auditor's preliminary report 
suggests various policy guidelines 
for the administration of grants and 
contracts that would create: 

— centralization of grant and 
contract development on each 
campus; 



changes; 

— separation of the various 
elements of grant or contract 
development, contract approval* 
accounting, and the monitoring of 
academic performance. 

The principle suggestions, ac- 
cording to Wood, which are likely 
to be contained in the final report to 
be released later in the month, 
issued by Coopers and Lybrand are 
that: 

— The administration of grants 
and contracts throughout the 
University requires greater central 
policy direction and functional 



oversight of pertinent campus 
activities by the President's office, 
with appropriate responsibility 
vested in a Vice President in the 
area of management and control, in 
setting and implementation con- 
sistent with University-wide 
policies. 

- Department Heads- 
Chairpersons as well as Deans must 
assume a more active role in 
reviewing grant and contract 
proposals as to programmatic 
content and consistency with the 
academic objectives of their unit, of 
the campus, and of the University 
as a whole. 

— On each campus, an Office of 
.Grants and Contracts should be 
adequately staffed and given the 
authority to ensure compliance 
with all policies, procedures, and 
approval criteria; to collect and 
disseminate information con- 
cerning availability of contract and 
grant funds; to channel the formal 
submission of proposals after 
review and to receive and transmit 
notification of awards. 

Also in their final report, Coopers 
and Lybrand are expected to make 
a number of recommendations 
regarding the processing of 

continued on page 11 



Committe< 



by Dan LaBonte 

Stricter and more regularized 
procedures to control expenses for 
travel, meetings, honoraria, and 
consultants, and a more stringent 
control with respect to monitoring 
budgets and grant funds in the 
UMass School of Ed are a few of 
the recommendations made by the 
Blue Ribbon committee's report 
issued at the UMass board of 
trustees last meeting. 

Only one facet of the heavily 
investigated School of Ed, the five- 
member Visiting Committee ap- 
pointed by UMass President Robert 
Wood last March, despite the 
"relatively brief period of time 
allowed" for their evaluations, 
somtimes praised the School's 
innovation, yet often criticized its 
programmatic ambiguity and the 
general "lack of concern" for 
evaluation the committee felt 



/MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 
COLLEGIAN 

EDITORS 

Dan LaBonte, Debbie Schafer 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Ken Shapiro 

ADVERTISING 

Alan Anastos, Peter Birnbaum 

CONTRIBUTORS 

William Mills, Mike Fay, Joe 

Ma Honey, Berta Kundert, Mike 

Kostek, Andy McKenzie, Tyla 

Michelove, Jack Cahill, Stuart 

Cudlitz, Dave Santos, Jim 

Paulin, Tom Coffey, Kris 

"Wizard" Jackson, and the 

incornigable punster Michael 

Moyle. And anyone else we 

might have missed. 

Summer newspaper of the 
University of Massachusetts. 
The staff is responsible for its 
content and no faculty member 
or administrator reads It for 
accuracy or approval prior to 
publication. Unsigned editorials 
represent the view of this paper. 
They do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the student body, 
faculty, or administration. 
Signed editorials, columns, 
reviews, cartoons, and letters 
represent the personal views of 
the authors. 

The office of the 
Massachusetts Summer 
Collegian is on the second floor 
of the Student Union on the 
rampus of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 01002, 
telephone: 545:1902. 



appropriate for new undertakings. 
"What appears to be an ad- 
vantage almost invariably triggers 
an inversely corresponding 
disadvantage," the committee's 
report states. 

In a list of Ed School strengths, 
the committee cited "program 
flexibility" in reference to the 
school's movement from "con- 
ventional departments" to 
"clusters" which, to some degree, 
allowed the innovating "flexibility 
and individualization" that gave the 
school its distinctiveness among 
other national Ed Schools. 

However, in the list of 
weaknesses, the committee states 
there is no "carefully considered 
principle of cluster organization," 
and the ambiguous patterns of the 
clusters were sometimes "con- 
sequences of shotgun weddings." 
The committee cites two faculty 
members who compared the 
situation to Europe during the 17th 
century, "with persons speaking 
different languages and trading in 
currencies of different worth." 

Reorganization was recom- 
mended by the Visiting Committee, 
and they stressed a "serious self- 
study... in order to arrive at a 
substantive programmatic structure 
for which a sound rationale can be 
mounted." The committee also felt 
an essential need to differentiate 
the academic organization from the 
governance functions of the 
school. 

While the committee 

congratulated the school's faculty 
on their "vigorous and energetic" 
attitude, and cited the quality and 
overall calibre of their credentials, 
the committee found that faculty 
requirements were not clear, and 
that "some faculty members are 
relatively naive about the functions, 
structures, and about what is 
required for effective - indeed 
innovative — functioning." 

In reference to the highly 
publicized and alleged academic 
standard dissolution, the com- 
mittee found rather, that the 
school's acceptance of "more 
flexible and independent 
arrangements" pioneered 
education innovation which is 
being accepted more readily 



through out the country, and that 
the school's "willingness to go 
beyond knowledge to a com- 
mitment to action" was a major 
strength. 

In this strength however, the 
committee recognized that in- 
novation through experimental 
curricular modes occasionally 
resulted in inadequate attention to 
scholarship. 











«rro«T or inr 
visiji:.'. rr ?iittce is m school <if HTWHT 

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July, 1*75 

(f . Palrlda Cro<«t 
John 1. Coodlad 

Maxlrf i.ri'tnr 
Harold C. Ilaltllf 
Carl L. Karburerr 







"If there is any problem with 
standards, the solution would seem 
to lie, not in placing controls on the 
freedom to explore and experiment, 
but rather in encouraging hard 
evaluation of the innovative ap- 
proaches of the School. 

The extreme charges of 
irresponsibility, anti intellectualism, 
and the rest are unwarranted," the 
committee concludes. 

The committee's findings 
concerning the "degree mill" which 
the Ed School allegedly produced 
paralelled the Faculty-Senate 
Review Committee's results in that 
the quality of the dissertations were 
"good, although not outstanding," 
and that later dissertations tended 
to be "mo. 3 subjective, less 
scholarly, more 'diary-type' works." 

In an extensive and detailed list 
of suggestions, the Blue Ribbon 
Committee recommends: 

— that the School of Ed sharply 
differentiate the administrative 



functions of the Office of the Dean 
from the legislative and 
programmatic activity of the 
, faculty. 

- that there should be a Policy 
and Planning Committee of faculty 
and students, elected by faculty 
and students, who should be 
advisory to the Dean and to the 
faculty and students, and should be 
small, enough to maintain effective 
dialogue at regularly scheduled 
meeting. It is imperative to decide 
on the role of the Dean. 

- that there be an elected 
Academic Personnel Committee 
with the major function of 
reviewing faculty members eligible 
for tenure, promotion or merit 
salary increases, and that this 
committee be responsible for 
managing the recruitment process 
for new faculty. 

- that there be a Committee on 
Student Admissions and Com- 
pletion, and that this committee be 
appointed by the dean. The 
responsibility of this committee 
would be to review all applicants for 
admission in line with criteria to be 
developed by the faculty. 

- that the effectiveness of the 
governance and the decision 
making structure of the School be a 
continuing agenda item for the 
committee on Policy and Planning. 
Matters of policy with respect to 
the school as a whole must be 
discussed and ultimately approved 
by the faculty, with student par- 



ticipation and decision making 
power. 

— that there be a serious self- 
study, conducting completely 
divorced from the matters of 
governance and policy, in order to 
arrive at a substantive program- 
matic structure for which a sound 
rationale can be mounted. 

— that the necessary balance 
between general and specialized 
studies in education be facilitated 
by creating and granting a measure 
of independence of sub- 
specializations within each division. 

— that immediate, serious at- 
tention to devising a full range of 
both hard and soft approaches to 
evaluation. "There is no special 
merit to flexibility that permits a 
student to define his own learning 
project and then disappear for 
months to carry it out," the 
committee report states. 

— that responsibility for the 
management of all funds, both 
regular and extramural, and all 
support services be centralized in 
the Office of the Dean. 

— that the Office of the Dean, 
with appropriate faculty input, 
study present and future utilization 
of support services provided from 
regular accounts. 

— that there be initiated im- 
mediately an in-depth study of 
present and potential funding of 
faculty, research assistants, and 

continued on page 11 








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WEONgSPAY,*UGU4T, ^ ^97$ 



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THE MASSA<;Hg3>E3reS:S^MME»XX>U-EGIAN 



UlTlass Budget 




Chancellor; U.M«s. 
Boston 








fattier- 

UoKceyer Mel 
school 



% 103 M request: " standstill" at best 



by William Mills 

and 

Dan LaBonte 

UMass President Robert Wood 
termed the $90.9 million operating 
budget recommended by Secretary 
of Education Paul Parks "punitive, 
irrational, and unworkable", and 
instead proposed a $103 "stand- 
still" budget to the House Ways 
and Means Committee at a recent 
hearing in Boston. 



request an "honest one". 

Wood was forced to axe the 
budget once again, at the request 
of the financially troubled state, and 
the trustees voted "with reser- 
vation" to accept the final figure of 
$103.6 million. 

The final figure of $103.6 million 
represented "substantial—but 
responsible—reductions", ac- 
cording to Wood. 




''The House 1 budget was a nonsensical 
budget, in the, exact sense of the word,' 

• Robert Wood 



Wood, at a UMass board of 
trustees meeting later that day, said 
the House budget submitted by 
Parks was a "nonsensical budget in 
the exact sense of the word", and 
that its adoption by the House 
committee could result in the layoff 
of some 400 to 500 permanent 
classified and professional em- 
ployees and would make necessary 
the elimination of some 1,000 non- 
federally supported student jobs, 
and it could run the risk of laying off 
faculty members, as well as a 
possible closing of university 
research stations." 

The trustees last year had 
chopped an original $130 million 
request to $118 million. In his 
opening statement before the 
House committee, Wood said he is 
"prepared to revise the request of 
$118 million established by the 
board (of trustees) in somewhat 
happier times in October, 
"although he called the original 



Calling Parks proposal "cynical, 
simplistic and counter productive," 
and that it "reflects the short- 
comings of the cut- now-think- later 
approach to budgeting," Wood 
said he was "highly skeptical" 
about the budget cutting exercises 
in the executive department. 

"Cutting budgets across the 
board by arbitrary formulas.. .puts 
bad programs, outdated programs, 
unnecessary programs on an equal 
footing with good, productive 
programs," Wood said. 

While sitting next to Secretary 
Parks, and flanked by the chan- 
cellors of the Amherst and Boston 
campuses and by the acting dean 
of the Worcester campus, as well 
as a retinue of budget advisors, 
Wood said the $103.6 million 
recommendation would still require 
the university to "make serious 
sacrifices," and that if accepted 
"would require all our employees to 
continue to absorb the cost of 



*•••••••••« 



inflation." 

Wood also explained that it 
would require the university to 
absorb further increases in the cost 
of fuel and other supplies. 

Wood continued by saying that 
"the university at rockbottom, is a 
capital investment of this state.. ..an 
investment the state cannot afford 
to give up." 

Wood maintained that the layoffs 
and student job losses under Park's 
proposal "are deadly blows that do, 
indeed, strike at the heart of the 
university and at the com- 
monwealth as well." 

"We cannot be a party to House 
1 (Park's proposal), a punitive, 
irrational, and unworkable proposal 
that would erase the gains of a 
generation," Wood concluded. 

The Ways and Means Committee 
will make recommendations to the 
general House which will, as a 
whole, vote on all budgets con- 
cerning Mass. state colleges and 
public institutions of higher 
education later in the fall. 

One of the most controversial 
areas where P^rks has made a 
substantial cut in the university 
budget is in the Worcester medical 
school teaching hospital which is 
scheduled to open Dec. 31. 

Parks has recommended 
delaying the opening of the 
teaching hospital at least one year, 
thus saving 5.5 million in operating 
costs. 

Maintaining that there are plenty 
of medical facilities in Worcester 
already, Parks said he will 
recommend a delay in the opening 
until "the purposes of the hospital 
are clearly stated." Parks also said 
that university officials must realize 
they have to answer to the state 
and that the state should constantly 
be aware of the school's intentions. 

Acting dean of the Worcester 
Medical School, Dr. Reginald W. 
Butcher, pointed out the con- 
sequences of such a delay before 
the House committee. 

"To delay the opening of the 
teaching hospital would have an 
horrendous impact on the 
University of Massachusetts. We 
will not be able to provide proper 
clinical training for our students, 
our faculty will start to leave and 
the school's credibility will be 
seriously damaged," Butcher said. 

Butcher said 100 students have 
been accepted for the fall semester. 
He said, "It is essential the hospital 
be opened if these students are to 



receive proper training." There are 
also 41 students returning in the 
sophomore class. 

Butcher emphasized that $20 
million has been spent in the past 
10 years in recruiting and hiring a 
"group of dedicated clinical and 
basic science faculty members, 
administrators and support per- 
sonnel." 

After testifying, Butcher was 
confident in the House committee 



Senate will insert it," the statement 
said. 

The City of Worcester also has 
joined in the t battle to open the 
school as scheduled. 

Worcester City Manager Francis 
J. McGrath said he will 'meet with 
Gov. Michael S. Dukakis, Parks and:' 
Worcester area legislators and 
members of the Worcester area 
Chamber of Commerce Medical 
School Committee "to see if we 




.. 



university officials must realize they have 

* 

to answer to the state," 

- Paul Parks 



supporting the opening the opening 
of the hospital. 

"I think they (House Committee 
members) are very upset about 
Parks recommendation to delay," 
Butcher said. 

Worcester area senators, James 
A. Kelly, chairman of the Senate 
Ways and Means Committee, 
Danie. I. Foley and John J. Conte 
issued a statement shortly after the 
hearing supporting the university's 
position. 

"We are confident the 
Massachusetts legislature will fund 
the bulk of the budget for the 
medical school," the senators said. 

"If the secretary (of Education 
Parks) does not see fit to insert a 
supplementary request, we in the 



can join hands to preserve the 
future of the medical school." That 
meeting is scheduled for Aug. 15 at 
Worcester City Hall. 

McGrath said Parks proposal 
"will stymie the medical school as a 
medical school. The purpose of the 
hospital is a teaching hosptial. 

"Even though we're sympathetic 
with the secretary's thinking on this 
and the governor's plan for 
economy, when the medical school 
was set up originally they (< "icials 
backing it) said they did not rt ant to 
be a second-rate school," McG< ith 
said. 

"All agreed they v - ' i ; : ' ■ 
first-rate school. 



^^^^^^^^^ 







contmuru 



.... I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMAAER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST i3 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Student Voice 



Student Senate Executive Committee 

State- wide student lobby 
Collins shows support ... 



by Debbie Schaf er 

State representative James G. 
Collins (D- Amherst), expressed his 
support for a massive student lobby 
for higher education in 
Massachusetts, during a discussion 
with members of the Student 
Senate Executive Committee. 

"Practically speaking, we're 
going to have to show the 
legislators that there is a lot of 
support out there for higher 
education," Collins told the 
Executive Committee at their 
Sunday meeting. He called for a 
"grassroots campaign involving 
students, faculty, alumni and 
staff," throughout the state. 

"An organized student lobby 
could be very, very, effective" in 
the effort to prevent massive 
budget cuts at UMass and 
throughout the state, according to 
Collins. If students protest "in a 
professional lobbying way" the 
effect of student organization 
"could be very powerful with the 
legislature in Boston", he added. 
Students would be regarded by the 
legislature as less of a "self-interest 
group" than paid lobbyists, with 
more credibility concerning 
students' belief in their cause. 

Collins added that a well 
orgainzed student lobby would 
have much more effect than a one- 
time demonstration could have. 
"There's a demonstration almost 
every day in Boston, and legislators 
have become immune to that sort 
of thing. If students can organize 
enough to lobby in a professional 
way, it would show the legislature 
that students could also organize 
themselves well enough to throw 



someone out of office," Collins 
explained. 

Referring to Secretary of 
Education Paul Parks' 90.9 million 
dollar budget proposal as "really 
crippling for the University," Collins 
told the exec. comm. that a 
"minimum of six or seven million 
dollars must be added" to Parks 
90.9 figure to operate the University 
at a level comparable to last year. 

"VWre going to have a difficult 
time", Collins said, explaining that 
Parks' "crippling" proposal is based 
upon $700 million of new tax 
revenue, as proposed by Governor 
Michael S. Dukakis. Most 
legislators are inclined to reduce tax 
increases, and Collins said that he 
expects to see "potentially 250-300 
million dollars in new taxes". 

Retaining the University budget 
at last year's level (no increase in 
services or personnel) in keeping 
with UMass President Robert 
Wood's 103.6 million dollar request 
"raises a serious ethical question" 
according to Collins. 

"Is it fair for the University to 
receive all of last year's Budget (no 
10-20 per cent cut) and yet still cut 
other services?" Collins asked. It is 
this question of ethics which will be 
a major barrier in seeing that the 
UMass budget remains near-intact. 

Much will depend on the action 
of the House Ways and Means 
Committee, but Collins feels that 
Committee chairman John J. 
Finnegan (D-Boston), a UMass 
graduate, "is very strongly in favor 
of the University," he said. Collins 
added that he will be working with 
Finnegan "to provide some in- 
dependent recommendations for 
the University budget." 



"I'll be working to get the 
University through this with the 
best budget practically possible," 
Collins told the exec, committee. 

The House Ways and Means 
should have a report on the budget 
ready by early September, Collins 
expects. The budget is then subject 
to approval by the Senate Ways 
and Means committee and by the 
governor. 

"I would envision some cuts," 
Collins said. Representative Collins 
does not forsee a finalized budget 
before November. This delay in 
passing a state budget will further 
aggravate the fiscal crisis since "the 
longer we wait to enact a budget, 
the more revenue we lose in terms 
of taxes," Collins explained. 

After hearing Collins' remarks 
concerning the UMass budget, the 
exec, committee (which acts on 
behalf of the Student Senate 
during the summer) voted to en- 
dorse the proposal which calls for 
the establishment of a state-wide 
lobby and student association. The 
motion came as the result of a 
state-wide conference of students 
held on the UMass campus last 
week. A rally has been scheduled 
for September 17, to be held on all 
state college campuses. 

S.O.P. director John Fisher 
announced at the meeting that 
hiring for the Summer Organizing 
Project has been completed, with 
the appointment of Earl Brown as a 
staff member. Brown will be 
working on research in Third World 
problems. Brown's appointment 
completes the twelve member 
summer SOP staff, "who are now 
working capably in their respective 
areas", according to a memo from 




Debbie Schafer 



State Rep James G. Collins 



Fisher to the exec. comm. 

Members of the Summer 
Organizing Project are working in 
the areas of Research, Economic 
Development, and Organizing. This 
is the third week of operation for 
the Project. In reference to the 
SOP, O'Keefe commented that 
"they are all excellent people who 
seem to be doing an excellent job." 

Ongoing projects of the SOP 

continued on page 11 




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by Dan LaBonte 

Student leaders from six different 
State schools and public in- 
stitutions of higher education 
across Mass. have set a date for a 
state-wide student rally to be held 
on each individual campus on every 
state college throughout Mass. 

The Sept. 17 rally, in the form of 
a public hearing, will provide all 
students and student organizations 
from the various campuses an 
opportunity to finally voice their 
opinions on the possibility of tuition 
increases, proposed budget cuts, 
and the governance and economic 
programs concerning each in- 
dividual institution. 

The action came at an 
organizational meeting of a state- 
wide conference of students held 
recently on the UMass Amherst 
campus and included represent- 
atives from Boston State, Wor- 
cester, Fitchburg, Bridgewater, and 
North Adams State Colleges, 
UMass Amherst, as well as the 
student trustees from Mass. 
Community Colleges, and from the 
Mass. State College System. 

"State schools individually, 
especially smaller community 
college*, have come to the political 
realization that they have no clout, 
howev.r a collective organization 
of ate schools can be effective," 

Michael Brissonnette, meeting 
moderator „od the Attorney 
General from North Adams State 
•;ye Student Association. 
State representatives James G 



Collins (D-Amherst) expressed his 
support for a massive student lobby 
for higher education in 
Massachusetts recently during an 
informal discussion with members 
of the UMass Student Senate 
Executive Committee. 

"One thing we'll have to do is get 
a grassroots campaign going for 
higher education throughout the 
state, involving students, alumni, 
faculty, and staff," Collins told the 
exec. comm. 

"An organized student lobby 
could be very, very effective" in the 
effort to prevent massive budget 
cuts at UMass and throughout the 
state, according to Collins. 

"If students can organize enough 
to lobby in a professional way, it 
would show the legislature that 
students could also organize 
themselves well enough to throw 
someone out of office," Collins 
explained. 

With the financial crisis currently 
facing the state in mind, the 
representatives as a whole felt a 
need for state-wide representation, 
a need for coordination between 
the school and that information and 
resource sharing among the 
schools could change the student's 
current status of political inef- 
fectiveness. 

A state- wide public hearing could 
establish a common position 
among the state schools and as a 
result allow them to offer 
reasonable alternatives to im- 
pending tuition hikes and budget 



ac- 



cuts on a state-wide basis, 
cording to Brissonnette. 

"Our greatest area of concern is 
how to meet the needs of the 
students," he said. 

Another meeting of the state- 
wide conference of students is 
scheduled for Aug. 23 at the 
Worcester State campus. The 
student trustees from the Mass. 
Comm. Colleges and from the 
Mass. State College System said 
that by then reps from all the 
community colleges and state 
school will be informed of the 
meeting and will undoubtedly 
attend. 



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The Fine Arts 



By Mike Fay 

The Boston Bruins and the 
Boston Celtics, neither team 
"world-champions," have in their 
future a sparkling new sports 
complex. If it's built without a 
wooden basketball court, or minus 
an ice-hockey rink, or both, what 
will people say? A white elephant? 

The Fine Arts Complex here on 
campus is such a building, and an 
incomplete shell, the center is 
slated to open, officially, October 
10, with Seiji Ozawa conducting the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

"If you want to make a simile," 
says Complex Director Frederick 
Steinway of the $16 million facility, 
"You come into your house and 
there's a single lightbulb hanging 
from the ceiling, and nothing else." 

Steinway said that lighting and 



audio equipment have not yet been 
installed in either the concert hall or 
the theatre, the center's two main 
rooms. The center's two smaller 
rooms, Steinway said, have similar 
problems on a larger scale. 

Steinway said the University of 
Massachusetts Arts Council 
booked performances for the Fine 
Arts Complex on the "presup- 
position that these performing arts 
facilities would be properly 
equipped, and obviously they're 
not." Arts Council manager Alan 
Light echoed Steinway' s com- 
plaint. 

Most curiously enough, the 
money to pay for the purchase and 
installment of all this fancy 
equipment, (which includes items 
like: curtains to close, drapes, 
dimmer boards, light controls, 




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lights of all kinds, audio equipment 
of every sort, stage equipment, 
theatrical equipment, cycloramas, 
fly-systems, power, and sundry 
other gadgets under the sun), was 
appropriated, the Collegian has 
found out, as far back as October, 
1974, one month before meat- 
cleaving Governor Dukakis was 
elected, duly, by the people of the 
Commonwealth. And the Complex 
money was appropriated by the 
Legislature, in Boston. 

Light, whose Arts Council has 
booked for the coming season such 
names as, the London Symphony 
Orchestra with Andre Previn 
conducting. Van Cliburn, Ella 
Fitzgerald, Pete Seeger, Marcel 
Marceau, et cetera ad infinitum, 
calls the Fine Arts Complex 
"disfunctional". 

Light and Steinway complain 
that the state Bureau of Building 
Construction (BBC) which oversees 
all state constructed buildings in 
Massachusetts, is sitting on 
$650,000 earmarked for equipping 
the center as it should be. The BBC 
has been holding the money since 
October, 1974, the two say. 

On top of the money, the BBC 
has been holding the specifications 
detailing all the work and equip- 
ment the center still needs, also 
since October, 1974. Normally, the 
BBC would accept bids from 
contractors on the specifications, 
and then award contracts to the 
best bidders. But the BBC just sits. 

Says Light, "The money's there. 
It's been appropriated. And don't 
you know that every year they let it 
sit there, it's worth less. And now 
it's only worth $500,000." 

Says Steinway, "Bids were 
supposed to be let. Contracts were 
supposed to be sent out." The 
results Steinway laments. "What it 
means is, we'll be operating under 
severe and austere conditions," he 
said. 

Steinway noted further, "The 
inaugural season was supposed to 
include many other gayla events 
including events which would be 
sponsored by the Theatre 
Department, the Music Depart- 
ment, the Afro-American Studies 
Department, and et cetera." But 
now, Steinway says, "They simply 
will not be done this year because 
there are no funds." 

Could this same trick be played 
on "the greatest attractions and 
artists of the world," as Light refers 




"What ft means w, we'll be operating 
under sever* and austere conditions^" 

• Frederick Steinway 




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to the acts and shows h°'s booked 
and scheduled for the upcoming 
gayla inaugural season? Light said, 
"We'll cancel them if they're 
severely restricted. They won't 
come." 

Light further noted he was 
"promised more than a year ago" 
that the center would be fully 
equipped in time for opening night, 
and that he should go ahead and 
contract shows. Says Light now, 
"They're going to have to have 
what we promised them, or they 
can't play. That's all. They're heavy 
technical shows." 

Light did say that gerry-rigging, 
or seat- pants flying, may bring the 
shows off. He said, "It's up to us to 
figure a way out." 

Of the entire affair, Light said, 
"The whole thing is a comedy of 
errors." But, he wasn't laughing 
too hard when he said so. 

And Light thinks somebody up 
top might take action to fix the 



problem. He said, "We haven't shot 
our last shot at the University. I 
think they'll respond." 

The man who is at the top of the 
hierarchy overseeing the Fine Arts 
Complex here on campus, and the 
man who might be able to help is 
Jeremiah M. Allen, Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

But Allen's secretary. Miss Jean 
Stolarski reports Allen will be out of 
town until August 18. Apprised of 
the BBC situation, Stolarski said to 
avoid "misinformation", an in- 
terview with Dean Allen would be 
appropriate. 

But Fine Arts Complex Director 
Steinway said, "We will have our 
inaugural event, but it won't be 
followed up with a large series of 
inaugural year events as originally 
conceived, as originally planned." 

And eyeballing the University's 
budget, Steinway said, "You can't 
go down to the cellar and shovel up 
a bucket of money." 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1975 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Dylan 
extroverted 

(DYLAN) Bob Dylan has been 
anything but his normally reclusive 
self lately, according to the latest 
issue'of Rolling Stone magazine. In 
a spurt of show hopping in New 
York City, Dylan caught the Rolling 
Stones at Madison Square Gar- 
dens; jammed with Muddy Waters 
and Sky King at the Bottom Line; 
and saw Patti Smith and Ramblin' 
Jack Elliott at the Other End, where 
he and an old friend, Bobby 
Neuwirth, took part in an early- 
sixties-style hoot. 

A Columbia records insider told 
Rolling Stone that Dylan's rumored 
one million dollar price tag on ''The 
Basement Tapes" album came 
about because he wanted to help 
out the band. The source said they 
were having financial troubles but a 
spokesman for the group denied it. 
Rolling Stone was told Dylan didn't 
actually get 'he million, but 
something close to it 

Hey 
Black People 

We're on the air! 

Black News Service and Black 
Mass Communications Project 
presents !&lack programming for 
you for the month of August on 
W.M.U.A. radio, 91.1 FM, Amherst. 
Listen to: 

"KUUMBA" every Tuesday 
evening from 10 p.m. til 2. Sounds 
from the entire scope of creative 
black energies. Tuesday, August 12 
we have Sasa Music Workshop, 
live at the Pyramid and a program 
on the Rastafarians of Jamaica. 
Next week, August 19 listen to An 
Interview with Unity Ensemble, 
members of the progressive black 
music group bringing you insights 
on black music. Tuesday, August 
26 a special dedication to John 
Coltrane. 

"UNIVERSAL RHYTHMS" on 
Thursday evenings, 10 p.m. til 2. 
Brother Sa'id AbdelMalik hosts 
black music sounds of the cosmos. 

Also, Friday evenings from 6 p.m. 
until 10, B.M.C.P. brings you 
Popular Black Music, right before 
the boogie hour. 

Hey, black people! G.^e it a 
listen. 

The dope 
on dope 

This month the governors of 
Colorado and California signed 
similar bills reducing marijuana 
possession penalties. Possessing an 
ounce or less of marijuana now 
calls for fines up to $100. Amounts 
in excess of one ounce are 
punished as misdemeanors selling 
marijuana still remains a criminal 
offense. 

Two weeks before in Maine, 
James B. Longley, the country's 
only governor elected as an in- 
dependent, signed a bill 
establishing a maximum $200 civil 
fine for possessing not more than 
an ounce and a half of marijuana. 

With Alaska's action in May, four 
states have passed new laws this 
year discarding jail penalties for 
minor marijuana violations. Oregon 
was first to adopt a marijuana fine 
law in 1973. 

The laws van/ somewhat in their 
provisions and definitions, but in 
each possession of a small quantity 
of marijuana has been made the 
legal equivalent of a traffic offense 
that is enforceable by a citation 
instead of an arrest. 

Marijuana reform proposals 
remain alive in Michigan, New 
Jersey, New York, Washington 
state and Wisconsin. Hearings were 
held July 16 on bills in Ohio and the 



District of Columbia. 

Reform bills :n Georgia, Hawaii 
and Tennessee must wait for action 
until 1976. In Minnesota, a proposal 
for a $100 citation system was 
shelved until after the first of next 
year when the legislature's official 
session ended before final approval 
could be given. 

Bills in Arizona, Connecticut, 
Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, 
Massachusetts, Nevada, New 
Hampshire and Texas were either 
voted down or killed for the year. A 
proposal to include private 
cultivation in Oregon's marijuana 
decriminalization law was tabled 
without consideration. 

In a backward step earlier this 
year, Indiana outlawed items like 
roach clips and hash pipes, but 
exempted papers, apparently 
believing many Hoosiers still roll 
their own cigarettes. 

No additional Congressional 
activity has taken place since the 
hearings before Sen. Birch Bayh's 
(D-lnd.) Juvenile Delinquency Sub- 
committee in May. 




G.S.E.O.C 

On Thursday, August 7, the 
G.S.E.O.C. (Graduate Student 
Employees Organizing Committee) 
held their weekly meeting in the 
Campus Center. The G.S.E.O.C. is 
working at forming a union for all 
Teaching, Research, and Special 
Assistants. The status of graduate 
student employees is presently 
being threatened by a combination 
of budget cuts, freezes, and 
outright elimination of positions. A 
representative from the Graduate 
Employee Organization of the 
University of Michigan spoke at the 
meeting, explaining how the G.E.O. 
formed when UMichigan graduate 
students found themselves in a 
similar situation to that of UMass 
graduate student employees at 
present. 

A potluck supper will be held 
next Thursday, August 14, to 
continue discussion of fall 
organizing strategies and issues of 
concern to graduate student 
employees. The supper will be at 
6:30 at 22 Butler Place, North- 
ampton. Call 584-3051 for further 
information. All graduate students 
concerned about their financial and 
academic future are invited. 

Zappa suit 

(FRANK ZAPPA) Frank Zappa's 
$20,000 lawsuit against the Royal 
Albert Hall was recently denied by a 
London judge, reports the latest 
issue of Rolling Stones Magazine. 
The suit arose from a 1971 can- 
cellation of a Zappa- Mothers of 
Invention show for alleged ob- 
scenity in some lyrics. The 
judgment in favor of the hall 
declared that, although the songs 
were not obscene, "the Albert Hall 
is in some respects unique amongst 
places of public entertainment" and 
had the right to pass judgment on 
Zappa's lyrics. 

Zappa said the three-week trial 
had cost him $50,000. When Rolling 
Stone asked why he bothered to 
sue for only $20,000, which was the 
cost of putting on the concert, he 
replied: "because I'm right and 
they're wrong. They're not only 
wrong, they're full of shit." 



Bib 

Sinners 
delight 



Black Oak Arkansas was working 
on its next album at American 
Recording Studios in North 
Hollywood when the building next 
door — a massage parlor called 
"Sinner's Delight" — burned 
down. The group had been 
recording a song called "Too Hot 
To Stop" for an album to be titled 
"X-Rated." 

Manager Peter Rudge tells 
Rolling Stone magazine, in its 
current issue, that' the Who are 
planning a tour of the United States 
for fall or winter. 

The latest issue of Rolling Stone 
reports that Paul McCartney and 
Wings have a song in the can called 
"The Crawl of the Wild," recorded 
in London with Dave Mason on 
guitar. 




Dope down 



(EARTH NEWS) - Marijuana 
usage at Oregon State University 
has actually declined since the 
passage of a decriminalization bill in 
Oregon two years ago, according to 
a recent survey. 

That was one of the facts cited 



by Lane County District Attorney J. 
Pat Horton, a staunch supporter of 
decriminalization efforts, in 
testimony before a Senate sub- 
committee which is studying 
federal marijuana reform proposals. 
Horton told the subcommittee 
that Oregon's progressive 
marijuana law has not brought 
about a significant increase in 
usage, and has effected a greater 
rapport and respect between young 
people and police. 

Watergate star 

(EARTH NEWS) - Frank Wills, 
the private security guard who 
discovered the Watergate burglary 
in progress and got it all started, is 
now re-enacting that historic 
moment for the movie cameras. 
Wills is portraying himself in the 
Hollywood version of "All The 
President's Men", the film of the 
Watergate scandals. 



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Super Bowl 

The spectacular glitter and 
pageantry of senior division drum 
and bugle corps competition is only 
two weeks away at the University 
of Massachusetts-Amherst. 

The fourth annual Super Bowl of 
Music opens at 7:30 p.m. on 
Saturday, Aug. 23, in Alumni 
Stadium with competition between 
five top national corps. 

Hosted by the St. George 
Olympians of Springfield, Mass., 
are the Skyliners of New York City, 
Hurricanes of Connecticut, 
Matadors of Rhode Island, Buc- 
caneers of Pennsylvania and 
Sunrisers of Brooklyn, N.Y. 

The Super Bowl of Music is 
sponsored by the Belchertown 
State School Friends Association, 
Inc., and proceeds benefit the 
retarded at the school. 

Tickets are $4, $3, and $2. Ad- 
vance ticket requests may be 
mailed to Joseph E. Sexton, Room 
236 Whitmore Hall, UMass, 
Amherst - 01002, or Springfield 
Area Ticket Information, c-o Foley 
Insurance, 120 Maple St., 
Springfield, Mass., telephone 736- 
5032 - evenings 736-2464. Checks 
should be made out to the 
Belchertown State School Friends 
Association, the sponsors of the 
show. 

Tickets will be available at the 
door. The rain-date will be the 
following day, Aug. 24, at 1:30. 

Hey veterans 

Education loans were extended 
to more than 2,700 veterans during 
the first six months of a program to 
help needy veterans in school under 
the Gl Bill. 

The loans, established by the 
Vietnam Era Veterans Read- 
justment Act of 1974, totaled $1.4 
million, the Veterans Ad- 
ministration reported. 

The figures revealed a sharp 
increase over the first three months 
of the year when only 503 loans 
were made. 

Veterans attending school under 
the Gl Bill, who are in need of 
money to meet education ex- 
penses, are eligible to apply for 
loans up to $600 per academic year. 



The loans are in addition to the 
monthly Gl Bill stipends, it was 
noted. 

Principal factor in determining 
eligibility is the comparison of 
"actual cost of school attendance" 
to the student's "total financial 
resources," a VA spokesman said. 

Applicants must be enrolled at 
least half-time and have sought a 
loan under the guaranteed student 
loan program of the Higher 
Education Act of 1965. Courses 
must lead to a standard college 
degree or be at least six months 
duration and lead to "an identified 
and predetermined professional or 
vocational objective." 

t 'yvr 




Repayment of principal and 
interest is deferred until nine 
months after the student ceases 
half-time enrollment. Interest at the 
rate of 8 per cent is charged and full 
payment is due within 10 years and 
nine months. There is no penalty 
for pre- payment. 

A 3 per cent loan fee is deducted 
from the face amount of the loan to 
provide a fund to insure against 
defaults which are recovered in the 
same manner as other debts due 
the U.S. government, VA pointed 
out. 

Students may apply for 
education loans at the VA regional 
office handling their school papers. 

Flight 
and bracket 



All flight and bracket winners are 
urged to contact the IM office to 
determine tneir opponents for 
playoff competition. For in- 
formation call the Intramural Office 
at 545-2801 or 545-2693. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

- HOUSING REFERRAL SERVICES - 

STUDENTS 

Rental Agents/Property Owners 

If you are a student looking for housing or if 
you are a rental agent with a large number of 
units or if you are a small property owner and 
are seeking tenants for a spare room or upstairs 
apartment, use our services; they are FREE. 

We have established a new computer based 
housing referral system in Amherst which 
serves the Pioneer Valley. We are not a rental 
agent but simply a service facility seeking to 
bring people and housing together in the most 
propitious manner possible. Through a 
cooperative agreement with 5 Colleges Inc., we 
can now offer services to all members of the 
Valley academic community. Contact: 

Off-Campus Housing Office 

3 Munson Hall 
UMass-Amherst 01002 

Phone 413-545-0865 



Dead bury 
distribution 

The grateful dead have given up 
trying to make and distribute their 
own records, reports the latest 
issue of Rolling Stone Magazine. 
Grateful Dead Records, the label for 
the group's product, and Round 
Records, their label for individual 
ventures, have signed with United 



Despite extreme heat and 
humidity, the event was both a 
social and financial success, thanks 
to the support of the many people 
who turned out to enjoy the 
evening, and to help cook, serve, 
and clean, not to mention those 
involved in preliminary preparations 
and advance ticket sales. The union 
raised over $200, a feat which 
would not have been possible 
without widespread support from 





)ie Schafer 

Stop forced bussing.. .trays have rights too!!! 



Artists for manufacturing and 
distribution. 

In explaining the move from 
Communal to Corporate Rock, a 
dead family member said: "We 
didn't take the recession into ac- 
count and our last two releases 
didn't do as well as we counted on. 
And the dead are working on two 
films and the money has been 
coming out of the record company, 
leaving us short." 

As for making deadlines imposed 
by United Artists, Dead Records 
president Ron Rackow said: "listen, 
we're so deadline conscious now, 
they couldn't possibly be more 
strict." 

U.SJL makes $ 

A dinner was recently held on 
behalf of the Union of Student 
Employees as part of an effort to 
raise badly needed funds for such 
major expenses as legal fees in- 
curred during the recognitional 
process, and publication of a 
newspaper in the fall. 

The crowd was entertained with 
music by "The Songs of Gypsy 
Children," an area folk band, and 
also by Doc, a well-known local 
musician. At the end of the evening 
the guests viewed two films 
produced by local 1 199, the hospital 
workers' union. "I Am Somebody" 
and "Like A Beautiful Child" dealt 
with that union's organizing efforts 
in South Carolina and New York 
City. 



the Campus Center workforce, and 
also from the graduate student 
employees presently investigating 
unionization possibilities. 

This was the first major fund- 
raising event in U.S.E.'s continuous 
effort to raise money for legal fees, 
publications, paper and printing 
costs, and all the other ongoing 
expenses which are incurred in the 
everyday operation of the union. 



'Starr' struck 

Ringo Starr celebrated his 35th 
birthday with a party at his Beverly 
Hills home. Guests included the 
Rolling Stones, George Harrison, 
Producer Richard Perry, and Keith 
Moon, who'd arranged for a 
skywriter to spell out "Happy Birth- 
day Ringo". According to a report 
in the latest issue of Rolling Stone, 
the evening kicked off when Ringo 
failed to blow out the candles on his 
cake. They were the joke kind that 
can't be blown out, so he took a 
plate and smashed them out. 

Nuke 
evacuation 

(EARTH NEWS) - The 
Defensive Civil Preparedness 
Agency is studying ways to 
evacuate Americans from major 
cities in case of a nuclear war. The 
agency is negotiating a $70,000 
private contract to develop a 
preliminary plan. 

The study, called "Crisis 
Relocation for Large Metropolitan 
Areas," will include the area from 
Washington to Boston in a test 
sample of how best to move "non- 
essential civilians" to rural areas 
safe from attack. The agency's 
research contractor will use a 
computer to study road maps and 
population figures to plot who goes 
where. Agency officials say they 
also plan tests in other parts of the 
country, but insist that this is a 
study, not a drill. 

Medical money 

The Division of Nursing of the 
School of Health Sciences at the 
University of Massachusetts- 
Amherst has received four grants 
totalling $301,137 for the present 
academic year. 

A $163,895 grant is for a second- 
year continuation of the Com- 
munity Satellite Learning Centers 
to implement the bachelor of 
science in nursing curriculum under 
Dr. Ira Trail, division director. 



INTEAMLCALS 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, AUG 



ilST 13. 



If75- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WHAT'S COIN' ON 



Loveioy's Nuclear 



Wednesday, August 13 
8:00 P.M. Thompson 104 



If you live in the area, even for a 
short time, the name Sam Lovejoy 
is bound to be dropped. Most 
people are aware that his is against 
Nuclear Power and that he is a 
master tower toppler, but few are 
aware of his reasons. 'Lovejoy's 
Nuclear War' is a low bu^Tet 
documentary film that exp. .is 
Lovejoy's attitude and the concept 
behind his drive to make the 
nuclear power people think twice 
about the safety of their plant. 

The beauty of this film is that 
although based in an obvious bias, 
it attempts to deal with all the 



War 



people involved as fairly as ' 
possible. No innuendos, it's all ' 
direct quotes, filmed as you see it 
Sam has many insights to offer > 
about the rights of people to ' 
control their environment, to 
control their lives. 

This film is a must for those who 
care about their future. It won't 
save your life, but give you some 
hard facts to think about. It is one 
of the ways you can support the No 
Nukes project, as all procedes of 
the film (which you can have 
shown in your dorm) go back into 
the movement. Know the choices 
— see the film. 




POOR RICHARDS III 



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$" only $1 j 

J 256-8284 * 

* Belchertown Road j 
[•••*•*•**••****•*••••••••••••***#*• 



LANDRY'S MARKET 



The Oldest Grocery in Amherst 



Budweiser — 12 01. — 5.7$ case 
Munich — 12 oi. — 4.15 case 
Balentine Ale — 12 oi. — 5.55 case 
Heineken — 12 oz. — 14.95 case 
Wur I zbuger — 12 oz. — 14.00 case' 
Guiness — 12 oz. — 14.95 case 
Foster Lager beer — 25 oz. — 11 .15 case 
Ice (eleven pound bag) 
Charcoal — II lb. bag 
Fresh ground beef 

Minced Ham 
Pot Roast 
Cubed Steak 
Skinless Hot Dogs 
Chicken Roll 



DAIRY 

Idolnot farm fresh milk 1.43 gal. 
Cabots Tripple score butter t9c 



1.45 six pack 

1.05 six pack 

1.39 six pack 

3.75 six pack 

3.59 six pack 

2.49 

.99 bottle 

50c 

1.29 

79c lb. 

1.191b. 
1.591b. 
1.591b. 

1.091b. 
1.19 lb. 



PRODUCE 

Tomatoes 19c lb. 
Watermelon 10c lb. 
Cabbage 15c head 
New Potatoes 10 lbs. 19c 



711 Main St. Amherst 253 - 5387 

On the Belchertown Bus Route 




Wlu-ii the Philistines s;i\\ tlwir 
i-liiimpion \v;i.s draft, thry tVd. 



(August 13-19) 
Clean Living - Supermarket (Springfield), Aug. 15, 16. 
Fat - F-ifth Alarm (Springfield), Aug. 14-17. 
Widespread Depression — Lazy River (Northampton), Aug. 13. 
Bill Colwell Band - Rusty Nail (Sunderland), Aug. 14-17. 
Harpo & Friends - Lakeview Inn (Southwick), Aug. 14-17. 
Big Screamin' McGrew - 4 Leaf WhWow (New Salem), Aug. 13- 

16. ^»*ML 

Hamilton Bates Blue Flames - Lary River, Aug. 14-17. 

Deadly Nightshade - Lazy River, Aug. 19. 

Lilith - Poor Richard* HI (Amherst), Aug. 13. 

Bill Colwell Band - Supermarket, Aug. 19. 

Lilith - Bemardston Inn (Bernardston), Aug. 15. 

George Gritzbach - Chelsea House Cafe and Folklore Center (W. 

Brattleboro, Vt.). Aug. 15, 16. 

Magic Music Band - Warwick Inn (Warwick), Aug. 15-17. 

Honey Bear - Red Pantry (Belchertown), Aug. 15, 16. 

High Country - Supermarket, Aug. 13, 14. 

Max Creek - Supermarket, Aug. 17. 

May Apple - Red Pantry, Aug. 14. 

High Country - Smith's Beach (Southwick), Aug. 15, 16. 

Poor Richards III (Amherst) — Open Nightly except Monday; Aug. 
13- Lilith. ^ 

Rachid's (Hadley) - Open Nightly u. I 1 a.m. 

The Pub (Amherst) — Piccadilly Discotheque Thurs. thru Sun. 

Maxwell's (Had'ey) - Open Nightly, Jazz Night Every Sunday. 

Dial Tone Lounge (Hatfield) — Open Nightly until 1 a.m., Tuesday 

Night is Oldies Night. 

Fifth Alarm (Springfield) — Disco Nights Every Monday and 

Tuesday. 

September's (Chicopee) — Open Nightly. 



( T indicates tix on sale at ticketron in CC Hotel lobby) 
SPRINGFIELD (Civic Center) 
Go/den Age Club, Beano — Aug. 14, 1-3:30 p.m., T. 
Golden Age Club, Card Party — Aug. 15, 12:30 p.m. T. 
Miss World USA Beauty Pageant — Aug. 17 T. 
America — Aug. 23 7*. 
Jefferson Starship — Aug. 27 T. 
10 Years After - Aug. 30 T. 
Sweet Sixteen Party — Aug. 30, Banquet Hall T. 
Isaac Hayes — Aug. 31 . ^ £* 

Hatian Dance & Fashion Show — Aug. 31 (Banquet Hall) 7. 
Johnny Cash — Sept. 7 T.- ^^^ 

Bobby Vinton - Sept 24 T. 

Denver Vs. New York Nets, ABA Exhibition Game — Oct. 3. 
Royal Lipizzan Show — Oct. 7. 
Ice Capades — Oct. 14-19. 
Western Auto Dealers - Oct. 25 & 26. 

Golden State Warriors vs, Houston Rockets, NBA Exhibition 
Game — Oct. 26. 

O' Jays— Tower Of Power — Oct. 31. 

Guy Lombardo — Nov. 9. 

Ambulance & Medical Supply Ass. of America — Nov. 13-15. 

Boston Pops with Arthur Fiedler — Nov. 16. 

Hall of Fame Tip -Off Basketball Tournament — Nov. 28 & 29. 

LENOX, Mass. [Music Inn] all T 
Jerry Jeff Walker— David Bromberg Band — Aug. 16. 
New Riders Of The Purple Sage — Aug. 30. 

LENOX, Mass. (Tanglewood) all T 
Linda Ronstadt — Leo Kottke — Aug. 26. 
David Crosby & Graham Nash — Aug. 30. 



Music *n Dance Review 



New Vork dancer and choreographer Thomas 
Pinnock will perform here Thursday, August 14 in a 
music and dance review at 8:00 p.m. on 
Metawampe Lawn. 

Prior to his evening performance, Pinnock will 
teach an open master dance class in the North 
Physical Education Building at 2:00 p.m. Pinnock's 
dance study technique, "Ethnic-Jazz", uses 
movements from Afro- ethnic and Caribbean folk 
forms to give the dance student awareness of body 
mass and the ways it can be moulded into kinetic 
activity. 

At 8:00 p.m. Pinnock will appear with the group, 
Manifestation in a music and dance review 
celebrating the 60's and 70's. During his ap- 
pearance, Pinnock will perform three solos: Buffalo 
Soldier, Fetish and Shout. 

Pinnock is the leading soloist and balletmaster 
for the Rod Rodgers Dance Company. He has 
performed with the National Dance Theatre 
Company of Jamaica, Tally Beatt/s dance en- 
semble and is a co-founder of Choree-mutations. 

In case of rain, the 8:00 p.m. performance will be 
held in Bowker Auditorium. 




Manifestation 
to appear 

The New York based group, Manifestation will 
perform at the final concert in the Summer Ac- 
tivities series on Thursday, August 14. 

Manifestation will make three separate ap- 
pearances during the day. At 1200 noon they will 
perform a music hour on the Campus Center 
Concourse. At 2:00 p.m. the group will be in the 
Fine Arts Center, room 44 for an open rehearsal. 
Beginning at 8:00 p.m. they will appear in a music 
and dance review on Metawampe Lawn. 
Manifestation will be playing music of the 60's and 
70' s, sharing the stage with soloist Thomas Pin- 
nock. 

The group includes Kamal Abdul-Alim on 
trumpet and flugelhorn, vocalist Irene Datcher, 
Hanif Abdu Shahid on tenor sax, Daoud Haroon on 
trombone, Hakim Jami on bass, Charles Eubanks 
on piano and Art Lewis on drums. 

In case of rain, the concert will move indoors to 
Bowker Auditorium. 




Lynch Hour^K. 
Musk Series r* 



Pianist Leon Dunnell will be 

jfeatured in a music hour on the 

JCampus Center Concourse, 

Wednesday, August 13 beginning 

I at 12:00 noon. 

Dunnell will be performing 

[popular piano numbers and 

selections from Brahms and 

Chopin. Many of his numbers "will 

be his own variations on popular 

| piano pieces. 

Now a resident of Northfield, 
I Massachusetts, Dunnell studied 
piano at the New England Con- 
servatory of Music and under j 
composer John Duke. 



All events sponsored by Summer Activities are free 
to UMass summer students and fee paying conference 
participants. The general public will be admitted as 
space permits. 



= M 




Rte. 9 

434 Russell St. 

At The Arco 

Station Next To 

Campus Plaza 

256 0107 



Are you getting; ripped off? 

Check out our prices and see if you are paying more 
than you should be for name brand soda. 
16 oz. PEPSI $1.25 six pack 
12 oz. cans COKE $1.65 8 pack 

COTT quarts 38c each 

7 up— 16 oz. — $1.25 six pack 

We carry returnables 

We carry a full line of Regular and Diet Soda 

NAME BRAND SODA AT DISCOUNT PRICES. 

"WE ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS" 



PIZZA and SUBS from 




at 363 Main St. Amherst (is*-«s«7) 

and 71 Pleasant St. Northampton <su-27oo) 



Here at Fenton's you'll find 
all your tennis needs . . . 




Tennis Apparel: 
Tennis Rackets: 



Tennis Balls: 



Tennis Shoes 



We do 



Adidas 

Wilson, Dunlop, 
Davis, Spalding, 
Seamco, Bancroft 

Wilson, Spalding, 
Dunlop, Tretorn 

Converse, Adidas, 
Nike, Pro-Keds, 
& Patrick 



FREE DELIVERY 



Formerly Domino's 



Restringing Wrist Bands, Head Bands, Presses, Covers 

FENTON'S 

377 Main Street, Amherst 253-3973 

ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 

WHOLESALE* RETAIL 



" M)»»H«»«H«H«H 




/EDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 197S 



10 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1975 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN_ 



II 



Programs 



HMO: a new comprehensive health service 




by Joe Ma honey 

A plan for a new comprehensive 
services program for University 
faculty, staff, student dependents 
and area residents may be im- 
plemented as early as Fall, 1976, 
according to Barry Averill, 
University Health Services director. 

The Valley Health Plan (VHP) 
calls for the existing health care 
program to be reorganized as part 
of a Health Maintenance 
Organization (HMO) - a system 
for delivering health care either 
directly or through associated 
practitioners (in this case, Amherst 
Medical Associates) to a voluntary 
enrolled population in return for the 
payment of a fixed predetermined 
sum. 

Although students will retain the 
present Aetna health care plan, 
according to Averill, "they will 
benefit directly economically as our 
facilities would be utilized more 
efficiently." 



Other advantages of the VHP 
Averill foresees are: 

— health care for dependents, 

— availability of specialty con- 
sultation, 

— facilitation of recruiting and 
retaining young staff doctors 
because of a more diverse patient 
population. (University Health 
Services is now five doctors un- 
derstaffed, Averill said.) 

To receive federal aid under the 
HMO Act of 1973 the VHP must 
"enroll persons who are broadly 
representative of the various age, 
social and income groups within 
the area it serves." 

And it must be organized so that 
"at least one- third of the mem- 
bership of the policy making board 
of the HMO are enrolled members 
in the plan with an equitable 
representation of members from 
medically underserved 
populations." 



Off -campus 

Referral 

Service 



by Berta Kundert 

In these days of program and 
service cutbacks, there exists an 
exception. The Off-Campus 
Referral Service is a new service 
organized to help reduce housing 
problems in the area. Located in 
Rm. 3, Munson Hall, it is the first 
all-student run and organized 
service for commuters on campus. 

Says head co-ordinator of the 
service Dudley Phillips, "About 50 
per cent of the student population 
live off-campus and are not duly 
represented. Our existence ac- 
complishes two things at once. 
First, we take the load off Whit- 
more and secondly, we are able to 
provide better service because we 
have the student's interests in 
mind," Phillips explained. 

The service essentially attempts 
to give advice to all students in 
search of living quarters. "Though 



we've also been known to help 
non-students," Phillips added. The 
organization provides service to the 
entire five-college area. 

Applicants are asked to fill out a 
form indicating roughly how much 
they are willing to spend, the 
number of rooms needed, and 
preferences concerning the type of 
housing desired as well as other 
options. Applicants are informed of 
the results on a specific date. 

The service keeps in touch with 
major landlords in the region and 
maintains lists of all available 
housing. In addition, anyone else 
wishing to rent out living quarters is 
similarly requested to fill out a form. 
All forms are then run through the 
computer. 

There is a separate listing of 
housing offered uniquely to 
graduate students and faculty 
members. 

"We do our best to supply 
housing to all applicants," Phillips 
explained, "but frankly the housing 
situation here in Amherst is bad." 
In spite of this, Phillips feels the 
service has been able to improve 
matters somewhat. 

"We do need student support to 



exist," Phillips stressed. The office 
is currently being run by five 
permanent workers plus volunteers. 

"We try and make the truth 
about the housing situation clear to 
applicants and encourage them to 
play an active part in the search by 
checking with friends and referring 
to the papers," Phillips said. 

Phillips is currently researching 
specific housing problems in the 
area and has communicated 
grievances in the form of a report to 
governor Michael Dukakis. 



Amherst Motel 
and Apartments 

Route 9 — Opp. Zay re's 

I-IV2&2V2ROOM APARTMENTS 
Furnished — Air-Cond. — Pool — Parking — All 
Utilities included — near shopping. 

2568122 $190.00 256-8122 

LEASE SEPT. to JUNE 76 



56 MAIN ST 
AMHERST MASS 



AMHERST 
253 7002 



(Donald J. Qail 

REGISTERED OPTICIAN HEARING AIDS 



Amherst s First Optician 



Don't miss the 




Message Company's 




Back-to-Campus Discount Gi 


uide 


appearing Sept. 1 






Tel. 584-8531 - 584-8200 



BRAKE AND MUFFLER SHOPS 

9 PEARL STREET 

NORTHAMPTON 

OPIN 8 S 30 THURS 8PM SIT 3PM 



■ 







Coopers and Lybrand: in the till 



continued from page 2 



[transactions in the area of per- 
sonnel actions, purchasing, 
authorization of expenditures, 
killing and collection, contract 
close-out, honorarium payments, 
travel, and equipment and supplies. 
Wood also notes that in the light 



of the financial crisis currently 
facing the * university, im- 
plementation of these recom- 
mendations is going to be costly, 
"not only in terms of direct 
operational expenditures, but also 
in that it places additional burdens 
on the vast majority of faculty and 
staff who have been scrupulously 



honest, as well as in that it can have 
an inhibitory effect on innovation 
and change." 

Although this will provide the 
university with an "improved 
system of fiscal management," 
Wood concludes thet "such costs 
must not exceed the benefits 
desired." 



it Collins supports student lobby 



continued from page 4 

include research into liason with 
other state colleges and with the 
Resource Network, a review of the 
parking situation and proposed 
student towing service, and the 
formation of an Unemployed 
Students' Organization. The SOP is 
also completing a survey of 
possible forms of streamlining the 
SGA, developing a profile of the 
state legislature, and aiding 
students in the formation of a co- 
operative newsstand to be located 
in the Student Union Lobby, ac- 
cording to Fisher's memo. 

Also at the meeting, it was voted 
to authorize Student Senate 
Treasurer Jack Margossian to bid 
up to $10,000 for the acquisition of 
stereo equipment at the public 
auction of Soundscope of Hadley, 
Inc. The motion specifies that any 
equipment acquired would be 
offered for sale no earlier than Sept. 
10, and that no workable material 
be held out of stock. The stereos 
would be sold through the Union 
Stereo co-op at a g> at savings to 
students. Holding off on the sale of 
any equipment until September 
would ensure that all students 
would have a fair chance to make a 
purchase through the co-op, ac- 
cording to Exec. Committee 



member Sue Rivest. 

In other action, the Executive 
Committee voted: 

-postpone a motion which would 
authorize several budget category 
changes in the Credit Union 
Association, dealing with 
duplicating, printing, postage, 
telephone, and office supply costs 
totalling $285. 

-to authorize category changes in 
Index, allowing $400 to be trans- 
ferred from the printing and 
publication category to a new 
budget category for art supplies, 
the rationale being that art supplies 
are needed to produce the 1976 
Index. 

-to authorize the treasurer, to 
send the bid and issue a purchase 
order to the appropriate bidder to 
replace tools for the Student Auto 
Workshop, as some tools have 
been broken or stolen. It was also 
mentioned that the Student Auto 
Workshop would be open on 
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday 
during the fall semester with 
tighter security precautions to 
prevent further theft of tools. 

-to approve the $15,279.30 
amount for Larry Magid's salary 
and the remaining $5,720.70 for the 
Vi assistant director, in the stead of 
the SCER board director. 

-to allocate $201 to the UMass 



Tenants Association Day Care 
Camp to meet operating costs. Day 
camp director Ann Wade explained 
that $1,100 had been obtained from 
alternate sources to operate the 
Day Care Camp, but $200 was 
needed to meet costs for the 
summer. 

-that the Student Senate 
Summer Executive Committee 
support the state-wide student 
rally to be held on all state college 
campuses September 17. 

-that the Summer Exec. Comm. 
endorse and participate in a 
meeting with the principal ad- 
ministrative officials (PAO's) of the 
University on Friday, August 22 
from 1:00 to 5:00 P.M. "The pur- 
pose of this meeting will be to talk 
about possible problems that will 
arise in the Fall, and to try to iron 
them out beforehand," said Senate 
President John O'Keefe. 

-to rescind a motion passed at 
the last exec. comm. meeting 
which instructed treasurer 
Margossian that no Senate money 
would be spent for the purpose of 
attending the National Student 
Association (NSA) conference in 
Washington, D.C. later this month. 

-to allocate $45 to defray the 
costs of a dinner meeting to be 
attended by members of student 
government and University of- 
ficials. 



* Visiting Committee: not great 



continued from page 2 
T.A.'s not now supported from 
hard money. 

— that, at an early date, a policy 
decision be made with respect to 
the portion of total resources to be 
devoted to pre-service teacher 
education. 

— that any steps likely to lead to 
a creation of a separate teacher 
education faculty be assiduously 
avoided. 

— early clarification of the types 
and range of in-service education 
programs to be conducted, and the 
committee urges wide-spread 
participation rather that con- 
centration in a designated group. 

— that there be initiated within 
the beginning of the fall term an 
inquiry, leading to policy, into the 
kind of School of Ed to be 
developed and maintained at 
UMass. Is it to be primarily a 



graduate school? a fully com- 
prehensive professional school? or 
a move toward a greater research 
orientation? 

The Committee vehemently 
suggests that there be no delay in 
implementing their suggestions and 
should not wait until a new Dean is 
appointed. In response to this 
suggestion, Umass Chancellor 
Randolf Bromery has outlined a 
"general plan of action." 

Bromery's first proposal is to 
appoint "as soon as possible" a 
Search Committee for a new Dean 
of the Ed School. The committee is 
to consist of five faculty members, 
five persons from within or without 
the School of Ed appointed directly 
by the Chancellor, one under grad 
and one grad student. 

Bromery also intends to establish 
two Task Forces which will 



"develop recommendations for 
internal academic reorganization to 
replace the existing clusters with 
units more in consonance with 
programmatic directions, and to 
review the governance of School of 
Ed and of its administrative 
structure, and to develop 
recommendations for possible 
modification," according to a 
statement issued by the chancellor. 
He does not say who will be on the 
Task Forces, or how they will be 
chosen. 

In addition, Bromery intends to 
create two separate committees to 
evaluate on a continuing basis the 
experimental programs and 
processes within the Ed School, 
and to make recommendations 
regarding fundamental questions of 
policy with regard to future 
directions of the School, according 
to Bromery. 



it UMass budget 



continued from page 3 

"We're afraid that temporary 

economies would be a permanent 

policy for the school, and this 

would be negative," McGrath said. 

Trustee Cavin Robertson of 
Worcester, speaking on Parks' plan 
to operate a prepaid health plan at 
the hospital, said it was "crazy" 
and that it would be "fiscally 
irresponsible to keep the $53.7 
million referral hospital closed. 

"This is the only state institution I 
know of that can bring in revenue", 
Robertson said. He said he wanted 
the governor to take an informed 
position immediately. 

Supporting Robertson, Dr. 
Edmund J. Croce, Worcester 
surgeon and trustee, said, "Unless 
the hospital opens the medical 
school will be a second-rate in- 
| stitution." 

Robertson added he can only see 
'10 years of planning and $130 
million in investment over an 



acknowleged necessity (medical 
school) be drastically affected" if 
the hospital opening is delayed. 

After the House hearing Wood 
was asked if he could foresee a 
tuition hike at UMass. 

"I won't make any decisions 
about a tuition hike until I see what 
the committee (House Ways and 
Means) gives us," he said. 

Wood did say, however, that a 
tuition hike at the university would 
not resolve the state's fiscal 
problems. 

Meanwhile, on the UMass 
Amherst campus, Chancellor 
Bromery has been implementing 
"austerity measures", in order to 
reduse expenditures on a campus- 
wide scale, that apparently include 
25 chartered aircraft flights. 

Bromery insists the flights, over a 
20- month period at a cc : of over 
$3,000, were for "official business." 

According to Bromery, the flights 
were paid for from interest on 



UMass trust funds, not on money 
appropriated by the legislature or 
from student funds, which would 
come from the Students Activities 
Tax Fund (SATF). 

"The appearance of it (flying) 
bothers me, but you can be penny- 
wise and pound-foolish. If I have to 
be inefficient to show that I'm 
frugal, that would violate my 
principles," Bromery has reportedly 
said. 

Bromery said he opted to fly, 
rather than drive, because in the 
plane he can do work, and he flew 
only when his tight schedule 
precluded driving. The average cost 
of the plane," Bromery said, ac- 
cording to a recent Boston Globe 
report. 

Mary Fifield, a spokesperson 
from Gov. Michael Dukakis' office, 
reportedly said, "The governor's 
feeling is that this kind of ex- 
penditure, in light of the enormity 
of the state's deficit, is outrageous 
at best." 







'!'if)lliliiil|l|)«/? 



MH||l(li|iilhi:i;i:ii|ll|ii< 
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With tht» coupon and a IS puicnas* j x ^^^ 

2 ply roll ^™ JiW^fam 

Jumbo 



Viva 

Ml Jumbo «a 

Towels 



sx _ 

39 



Good Mon, Aug 11 -Sat. Aug 16 Limit one roll per customer 

.'V "V '".""."*'.".".' VYV'.'VVVVV" I 

lYIIMir -* I 1 



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is AAAAAAAAAAA*AAAAAAAAAAAAAA**A**IV.aA../W M lAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMr^ 1 " j 



With this coupon and a $S purchase 



Star Kist AtfV 

*— tChunk Light ^W mA 

Tuna MX* 



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i 
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Good Mon Aug 1 1 - Sat , Aug 16 Limit one can per customer 
j ".".'VVVUVVMV, §J32x' 




Nabisco 

12oz. 

Box 



I 

(his coupon and a $5 purchase $X ^^^^ 

Ritz 4Q 



Crackers 



Good IVton . Aug 1 1 -Sat . Aug 16 Limit one box per customer 

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With this coupon and a $5 purchase 

Sun Glory 

frozen *^ 

100°o Orange |uice •■ '***0^* 
from Florida 12 0Z. Can 

Good Mon . Aug 1 1 -Sat . Aug 16 Limit one can per customer 



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29 



AftftAfc - I 

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With this coupon anC a $5 purchase $X 

Land O' Lakes mmgfot 

Butter 79 i 

1 lb. pkg. V» lb. Prints 244 | 



1 lb. pkg. V4 lb. Prints 

it. 

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Good Mon . Aug 1 1 -Sat . Aug 16 Limit one pkg per customer 

muu /t;i,lu»yi.iMWM»VWVWVVV»WVVVWVVVWMVMV'."."". ,'V>, ''^299* 

Shoo w I 



Pries* effective Mon.. Aug. 11 -Sat.. Aug. 16. 

Barbecue 

Steak 

Sale! 





Chuck Steak 




Beef Blade ' Bone 

Formerly Called 
1 st Cut Chuck Steak 

Let em eat steak Barbecue to perfect eating 
goodness . enjoy! 




(Beet Chuck Bone-In) Formerly 
called California Chuck Steak 



Underblade Steak 
Boneless Chuck Steak 
Beef Rib Steak Large End 
Boneless Beef Rib bye Steak 



Quality-Protected 



4th Thru 7th Ribs 



Stop • Shop $ Q 
Great Beef O 



lb 

29 



Simply Super-Uniformly good everytime 

Ground Beef «Q 

'Simply Super regular ground beef contains not more than 28% fat ^^^^J ^Laa^lb. 

Swift's Premium 

Sib. Can tied 
Ham $ 6" 

Primo Italian Sausage H t rsweet*i 4 ! 



Park's Fresh Beef Sausage 

s^ 



12 oz pkg 



$139 



1 



Banquet Meats 

CookinBags 4'*fl 

Chipped Beef. Sliced ^M t * 9 *A 
Turkey, Sliced Beef or Meat Loaf 

Light n' Lively 
Ice Milk, QQ 

Assorted Flavors carton «^«4^ 

Troplcana 

Orange Juice 



Big Daisy Bread 



'is ■« ^ 



sliced 

white 



322 07 ] 
loavat^^ 



>'>100S Orange |uice tiom 
« Florida Just pour and serve 



at^7 




Westside //l\ 

Calif. \M 
Cantaloupe 

4 

Fresh, Delicious... 

Red Plums 



Scoop out seeds, fill 
with Slop* Shop Nat- 
ural Vanilla Ice 
Cream yummy 1 

JUMBO S 



Sandwich or 
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la 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



Review 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1975 



v/ * IwEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1975 



WIZARD OP U> 



m 




UNEVENTFUL 

LIVING 



by Mike "The Kibitzer" Kostek 

Oh no. None of that 'Welcome 
Back' medula here. You were there. 
You saw what happened. You 
stayed whether listening to the 
local slopp station on your summer 
job with Revenge Wire & Cable in 
Zoar, or if you found yourself 
scrawling your simpering live style 
on the Boston Garden 3rd Balcony 
floor as you lay and pondered what 
had brought you, a loveable little 
Portagee, inexorably to the hockey 
cave to see Pink Flyod (as the 
papers kept spelling it). 

As it probably says about this 
optical machine, sketch (providing 



Mackenzie's and my humble 
wishes get transformed into regal 
reality — "Strange events allow 
themselves the luxury of occurring" 
— C. Chan. — and the maze of 
darkness that is the editing and 
printing that will descend after I 
hand in this thang will not claim our 
bright, frail with some Wonder of 
Thought like "Summer Music 
Review"), "Uneventful Living" is 
the best way for me to describe 
Summer 1975 in two memorable 
words. We all lived free of any real 
velocity this season, as nothing 
came down the shute to touch us, 
eat us, hug us or mug us. Certainly 
nothing akin to "Butcher Shop", 
the 1965 classic is sung by Saul T. 
Peter on the Dirty Top • Thirty 
album, Hot Pepper, strode into the 
ham and cherry summer night air 
with the thought-oriented 
feministic reality of these words: 
"A guy walks in the butcher shop 
and started feelin' everything. 
The girl behind the counter yelled 
'Take your hands right off that 

thing! 

Come on, quit your feelin' around, 

cause my meat just ain't for sale." 

And no, nothing the ways and 

spasmodic means of "God Is My 



Notices 



UMASS CRAFT' StfCP 

Part time work "in; \SM ass Craft- Shop 
starting September-:' "3rd. Must have 
knowledge of leather and sijver jewelry, 
work. Ability to ; dbVffcpairs and main- 
tenance of sewing 'machines-polishing 
motors etc. helpful. Applications available 
at the Student Activities Office, 416 
Student Union. Deadline August 22nd. 
BMCP /« 

BMCP (Black Mass - Communications 
Project) Black Programming on 

W.M.U.A. radio, 91.1 FM: . 

"Kuumba" - Tuesday evenings, 10 p.m. 
until 2. Progressive black, music, poetry 
readings, interviews. Hosted by sisters 
Sandra Jackson and Kandi Bourns. 

"Universal Rythms'''"- Thursday 
evenings, 10 p.m. until 2." Progressive black 
music with Bortt Sa'id AbdelMalik. 

"Popular Black Music'*'.- Friday evenings 
6 p.m. until 10. Hosted by Brother Rick 
Grant. 

For those interested in learning radio 
and-or obtaining your Third Class License 
there will be classes every Tues. and 
Thurs., 2:30-4:30 p.m. and in the evenings. 
Call Kandi or Sandra, 545-2876 for further 
details. 
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Commuter Assembly of the 
University will sponsor a free roommate 
party on August 9th on the campus. The 
party is intended to bring people together 
and to help people who wish to be 
roommates, or looking for roommates to 
get together. The party will begin at 4:00 
p.m. and go past 10:00. Refreshments and 



entertainment will be provided. The 
location is Farley Lodge. For further in- 
formation call 545-0865 or 545-0145. 
CRED UN ASSOC 

The Student Credit Union is seeking 
individuals who wish to gain valuable 
experience by working in a financial in- 
stitution. Potential to earn credits. 

LOST 

Woman* U.M. Class ring with initials 
EEL. Please call 549-1563 if found. 

PEOPLE'S GAY ALLIANCE 

People's Gay Alliance general meeting 
Aug. 6 (Wed.) at 7:30 p.m., 903 Campus 
Center. Also, a gay teenagers group is 
forming for rap sessions, >nformaa events. 
If interested, get further details at PGA 
office 413 SU or call 545-0154. 
UNIVERSITY WOMENS CAUCUS 

University Women's Caucus meeting 
Thursday, July 31 12:00-2:00 p.m. in Rm. 
901 C.C. There will be continued 
discussion on "women and the 'budget 
Info, sharing and organizing strategies. 
BISEXUAL WOMENS RAP GROUP 

meets for informal discussion every 
Monday nite at 7:30 p.m. in the Campus 
Center. Check the schedule near the 
elevator for exact room location. 
BROADSIDE POETS 

Poetry Reading Wed., Aug. 13, 8:30 
p.m. Broadside Bookshop, 247 Main St., 
Northampton. David Lenson, Henry 
Lyman, H.W. Tjalsma, Frederic Will. 
Refreshments. This is a non-profit 
organization. No charge for anything. 



Darkness", the theme song of the 
National Citizen's Council For Piss, 
nor "The Night Has Ways of 
Getting To Bed" by Captain 
Weapon made the sounds of our 
hear ring with any enomous 
energy. 

If we start at the top, we soon 
see that the biggest not necessarily 
means the best. And where's our 
ray guns? I was hoping for one by 
now... 

The flash of all time, seemingly 
never to go out (or away), is Elton 
John, whose latest loosening, 
Captain Fantastic & The Brown Dirt 
Cowboy (MCA) made the biggest 
Pop Music waves of all time by 
breaking in at No. 1 (never hap- 
pened before) in Billboard's (the 
best trade magazine — good trades 
made with that one) album chart. 
Goes to Show, though, as the folks 
got a listen to the album, found 
little hits, and shortly gave Eltie the 
"Move over, Meatloaf, you've got 
company" shrug. 

Company it was, the form of 
the other major roll-up of the 
summer, Paul McCartney & Wings' 
Venus & Mars (Capitol). Big hit 
("Listen To What?") undoubtedly 
followed by a few more made for 
wide Top 40 Saleability, but the 
disc lacks Band On The Run's 
cleverness, and settles down to a 
mediocre level. 

Hits in other mediocrity are the 
Eagles, who hit it with One Of 
These Nights, (Asylum) a sodden 
cloverleaf of hard-working 
shallowness. No growth, nothing 
beyond mere pleasantries. 

Also coming up down is Neil 
Young, whose Tonight's The Night 
(Reprise) continues to display a 
readily sellable dear heart, but when 
matched with a wooden head, the 




McCabe & Mrs. Miller 

Wed. 13th Sat. 16th 
7:0049:20 

IMAGES 

Sun. & Tues. 7:106.9.10 

Tilt Harder They Come 

Fri.&Sat. 11:30 

globe 



586 09J5 
I Pleasant St., Northampton 



m ROOMMATE WANTED 



F roommate wanted for 2 bdrm. 
Townhouse $70. Call Ann 649-1347. 

Roommate needed, own room 
$90 mo. Belchertown Linda 323- 
►6637 

2 F wanted for 3 bdrm. apt In 
Puff. VII. $86 mo., haat Inc. Call 
703 660 2632 collect. Ask for Debra 

I or coma to 221 Puff ton between 1-8 
p.m. after Aug. H 

F. RM ATE. Hadley $02.60 mot 666 
4166 after 6:00. 

3 F SEEK A 4th for 2 bedrm 
Townhouse $70. includes utll Call 
Anne 648-1347. 

ROOMMATfwANTrD 
RESPONSIBLE M F room- 
mate. Own room In furnished 
3 bdrm. townhouso. Busline. 
pool, tennis, air conditioned. 
$110. includes utilities. No 
lease. Bob 263-7867. 

FOR RENT 

APT8. FOR RENT. Squire Village. 
$216.00 per mo. 2 bed. 1% bathe, 
town houses. Kemlns Reeleetete 
open deily b evenings. 



QUIET ROOM for rent - woman 
only, 6 min. walk to Amherst 
Center, 10 min. to campua. Call 266 
6216 or 367-8820. 

APTS. FOR RENT Cllffalda Apt. 
$180.00 All utll. Alao (8 mo. 
program avail! 666-~3868. 

Room available in Puffton. Rant 
$86. Call pereon to pereon for 
Martha 617-633-8067. 

ROOM WANTED 

Room in a houea wanted. Single, 
up to $100 mo., Incl. utilities. 
female, senior, reliable, friendly, 
neat, etc. June 263-6467 or 646-0861. 

24 YEAR OLD men neede e home 
for Sept. Rurel house with friendly 
stable people sought to share 
interests Iredical politics, jaiz), 
work, and expeneee. Neat, e good 
cook, end e non-emoker. Own car. 
Call 617 621 0636 after 6 or write 
Steve Shulmen, 406 Centra St., 
Jemeice Plein, MA 02130. 

AUTOS FOR SALE 

71 VEQA. IMMACULATE, 
40,000 miles, 30 mpg, 3 spd 
standard, only 886. Bob. 263- 
7867. 



lyrical and musical cliches he spews 
forth are understandable. Large 
Continued Commercial Success as 
Artiste of the Masses is forecast. 

Both sides of the singer- 
songwriter world I've theorized are 
shown in Neil and James Taylor, 
who operates with something a bit 
more searching upstairs, but lacks 
Young's stilted yet agonized, 
tormented Search For Purpose (M- 
F, 1:30 p.m. Ch. 13). James' Gorilla 
(Warners) reflects a man looking 
for something more to be than just 
a nice singer of black songs to 
white people ("How Sweet It is"), 
but he's not trying that hard, and 
interest on both sides tends to 
wander. (Anyone who, in this year 
1975, writes a song called "Music", 
is not on best terms with his Muse). 

You know, for a Rolling Stones 
Touring Summer, it was kinda 
quiet. They had two albums leak 
out, rather than splash with their 
usual impact, and while their tour 
certainly fanned sales of these two 
odd collections, we heard little we 
hadn't heard before. Overall, spirits 
flagged to the point where one of 
Rolling Stone's covering the 
Stones' tour (always a maximum 
event for the paper) wondered how 
big a deal it was to be the world's 
best (note upcoming modifying 
word) 'performing' rock band. 
Hmmm. Seems some of us are 
getting a bit too old for rock & roll's 
limited bounds. The two Rolling 
Stones albums did well in the 
charts. Made In The Shade was a 
hits collection of the 70's (all their 
music since Sticky Fingers that 
showed the band to be a hell of a 
cooker when shorn of the lesser 
material on their recent records. 
Stylish and interesting. 

Metamorphasis (ABKC) however, 



is the bastard offspring of one of 
the hungriest sharks in the music 
biz, Allen Klein, and his settlement 
with the Stones in his suit with 
them over money hassles left over 
from his days as their manager. 
Metamorphasis is old demo tapes 
dating back to Brian Jones days, 
recorded with assorted folks, and 
isn't really that much. 

Oops, running out of 
space... 



^ vtr V 



^ 



^ 






the songs of night 

run through my head 

like memories of home 

touch it and it's gone 

a frog harmonizes 
with your song 

a heavenly being 

play the stars 

like tiny bits of glass 

and down below 

you play your guitar 

your music floats past 

my open door 

on the wings of 

mountain crickets 

play, evening minstrel, 

of loved ones far away 

play on, til the moist 

blanket of air 
covers me with sleep 
and dreams of home 

Tyla L Miche/ove 




CfawijjtaU 



66 CHEV IMPALA. GREAT 
RUNNING. GOOD 

MECHANICALLY. $386. CALL 
263-7867 OR 263-8868. 



1868 VOLVO 144s rune well $860 or 
B.O. Greg. 648-1362 efter 4:00. 

66 CHRYSLER, beet offer. Bob, 263 
7867. 

68 PEUGOT' 403, eun roof, needs 
bsttery, $100. Drive It away. Bob 
2637867. 

MOTORCYCLES 

HONDA 126SL 3000 mi. exc. cond.. 
asking $476. Call Jeff, 6-2733, 648- 
0216. 

WANTED 

Tta. Boltwood Belchertown 
Project ie e nonprofit etudont org. 
working for the reeldanta of 
Belchertown State School. We 
need donetions of saleable items 
for e flee merket to fund our 
programs. Please cell 684-1909 or 
2668780 

"BOB STILL"" WANTS YOUR 
AILING OR DECREPIT CARI 
Feet $$ for the hulk 263-7887. 



RIDE WANTED 

RIDE WANTED to Chicago, Aug. 
17-18. Share driving and expenses 
Jim, 648-0473. 

MJE L_P_ WA N TJE D " 

SPANISH-ENGLISH Blllnguals 
needed for a paychology ex- 
periment It la a 6 day experiment 
(an hour a day) and It pays $12. If 
interested, call 646-2787. 

FORMER UMASS STUDENT 
WAYNE A. TIFFANY 

FORMER UMASS STUDENT 
Wayne A. Tiffany's whereabouta. 
Urgently deelred. $200 reward. Call 
John Toomey et 617-247-4370 or Mr. 
Gold et 617-826-2836 collect 

BLACK PROGRAMMING 

"KUUMBA", Tuoe. eves. 10-2. (Next 
week, en interview with United 

Ensemble) Unlversel Rythms", 
Thursdey evenlnge, 10' til 2. 
Popular Black Muelc Friday 
evenlnge. 6 til 10. 

SLRVICES " 

BOB WlU STllL FIX YOUR 
CAR RIGHT. Any make. yr. 
model. No iob to smell 263 
7887. 




PUBLISHING SERVICE will 
help prepare newsletters, 
pamphlets, brochures, all 
printed matter. Will aaelet In 
writing, editing, graphlca, 
layout printing, consultation. 
Campua groupa should 
prepare now for fall. Write for 
information: The Meeeaga 
Company of Amherst. P.O. 
Box 346. Amherst 01002. 

"the outback automotive repair 
apeciallilng in SAAB and other 
foreign cars, call . -367-2800. 

MOVING? 

CHROME THUMB TRUCKING 
offer* pood ratee for your next 
move._323-6628. _ _•____ 
LOST 

I LOST my blue thermal sweatshirt 
et the PHJB concert I em going' 
out Waat end desperately need It 
back. Plaeee turn it In to loet end 
found at Fine Arte or cell Leslie 664- 
8624. 

GAY DI8COI 

GAY DI8COI sponsored by 
People'e Gay Alliance ft Gey 
Women'e Ceucus, Aug. 16, Frl. at 
Farley Lodge. 8 p.m. - 1 a.m. 
Rafreehmente served 76 cents. Our 
leet eummer dleco. so let'e live yJ 
It upl 



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SIX 

MO)Trr5 
Of HW 







THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



13 



parkar and Johnny hart 




Your Stars This Week 

By Stella Wilder 



m> erne 

F3ACX 




MOOTHS 
Of FAT 



*a*fftj»2_f-i7 




6BCR6T 

OF 

soevivAx 



Concerns over the next six or 
seven days should be ap- 
proached as one might approach 
the completely unpredictable, 
that is, in the expectation of 
surprise at the very least Any 
who insist on having their ac- 
tivities mapped out for them will 
not fare particularly well over 
this coming week, for the prizes 
and rewards will most certainly 
go to those who are both willing 
and able to make swift and 
effective changes - midstream 
if necessary - and who are 
capable of meeting new and sud- 
den challenges with the same 
success with which they would 
meet challenges long-awaited 
and well-prepared-for Instinct 
will play a larger than usual 
part in success this week, for 
there will generally not be lime 
for the really productive engage- 
ment of the intellect 

The coming week is one which 
lends itself perfectly to such ac- 
tivities as the redecorahon of 
home or office - or any activity 
which might require an agile, 
facile mind in company with a 
keen eye. a good sense of the 
dramatic, and a strong desire to 
make a powerful - and good! - 
impression on others. Because so 
much of this week's success de- 
pends upon the decisions and ac- 
tions of the individual, joint en- 
deavors are not to be en- 
couraged Partnerships survive, 
but only if each partner is capa 
ble of acting alone for the time 
being. 

LEO <July 23 Aug 7) - Take 



stock of the fartffly situation 
before you begin to make plans 
for undertaking a new en- 
terprise on the employment 
scene You may wish to wait 
(Aug 8- Aug 22) - Don't expect 
co-workers to agree with you 
completely this week You may 
have to do some swift changing 
of your usual pace by mid-week. 

VIRGO (Aug 23-Sept 7) - 
There is much to be ac- 
complished around the home 
this week, don't, therefore, allow 
a slow penod on the employ- 
ment scene to depress you. (Sept 
8-Sept 22) - This us a week 
when you may not gain moch 
career-wise, but you can cer- 
tainly make headway where 
new friendships are concerned 
Smile' 

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 7) - 
There is little more than disap 
pointment in store for the Libra 
who insists on going after more 
than his talents can gain for him 
(Oct 8-Oct 22) - If you are v. ise 
you will be guided both b> your 
desires and your limitations 
Don't expect to make the kind of 
gains achieved only by experi- 
ence. 

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov 7) - 
Make every effort to remedy the 
conditions that are causing the 
present difficult situation within 
the family circle Don't 
misrepresent yourself. (Nov 8- 
Nov 21) — Take every , jor- 
tumty to lighten situations occur- 
ring this week on the employ- 
ment scene Don't allow eireum 
stances to overwhelm desire. 



B.C. 



SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 
Dec 7) -Don't take advantage 
of a situation if by doing so vou 
leave a friend in difficulties fry 
to solve your own probleir,s -- 
and another's. (Dec 8-Dec 21) — 
Contacts made early in the week 
may well prove less than valu- 
able as the week draws to a 
close Try to depend more upon 
old friends. 

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 Jan 6) 

— If you must work against your 
own principles in order to re- 
main popular this week, it isn't 
worth it Prove your point by 
sticking to it (Jan 7- Jan. 19) - If 
vou can persuade another to see 
things your way without any use 
of force, all will be well Other- 
wise, it would be better to give 
up 

AQL'ARIUS (Jan 20-Feb 3) 

— Unless you are absolutely sure 
of your goaLs at the time you 
begin work on a new project, 
you would be wise to postpone 
the start (Feb 4- Feb 18) - 
Unless you can act effectively, 
you would be better off not put 
ting forth the effort to act at all 
Reassure others of your desire to 
succeed 

PISCES (Feb 19-March 5) - 
If you are clever at reading 
faces, you should be abl'.' Hi 
forecast the mood of others m 
t ime to escape the consequences 
of discouragement (March 6- 
March 20) — Fear could easily 
keep you from making the kind 
of progress possible this week 
Isolate your fears and begin to 
work at overcoming them 



by johnny hart 











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69P A TICK , KERB 




Remember- 
August is %x Send-an- 

Obscene-Phonecal'- 

t o -Someone- You- .D/e 

Month* 
(Only 19 disgusting 
days left .) 



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HlfcU THE MORMt. k*J# t> 



V4 



< S TH€ MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 197S 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11^75 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMEft COLLEGIAN 



H 




* 

Records 



Monty Python's Flying Circus 

(Pye 12116) time 53:46 

The Album of 

the Soundtrack 

Of the Trailer Of 

The Film of 

Monty Python & 

the Holy Grail 



paid yer bill, but you, by the pinball 
machine, you kids, you didn't pay, 
so stuff it up! Anyway, who said 
paying a fucking (Imp Ang-Sex wd 
No. 1) quarter or $50 bucks or 
whatever made you a critic too? I'm 
in here, putting up with all your 
crep, and I've about had enough! 
I've at least listened to the things, 
and know more about them than 
(Note clever manner of hiding 
grades in body of copy, so skim 
readers must dig a bit deeper. Ha 
ha.). WAIT! I'm talking to you, and 
I'm. ..come back heie... 

OH oh, looks like we're about to 
be SPACED OUT! Get it! Hyahha! 
No more room on the pa 



by Mike Kostek 



Undoubtedly the funny of the 
age is divided between Monty P 
and Firesign T. Both are enraptured 
with splinters of our quickly 
splintering culture (Our culture 
splintering into cults). Monty packs 
not the Overall Import (even though 
they're British) of the Firesign, but 
their routine demolition of the 
routine and choatic makes for 
audience restructuring of a high 
order. Just see how reviewers 
review their work: 

"So, I think I'll start with a 
pounce upon their two records 
newly out, glibly packing them into 
one review (just like the Rolling 
Stone and Stereo Review will do), 
loudly yawping that one is an old 
release (from their earliest TV BBC 
days- throw in that offical stuff—) 
and the other is from NOW, their 
new movie, the Holey Grate thing. I 
shall then spiral into a 'bookends' 
comparison, the old-new 
delineation on their humor 
development, characterial (is that a 
word? better look it up) assertion, 
etc., giving the overall impression 
that I like them, and think they were 
good to start with, but have come a 
long way. I'll need a new paragraph 
when I trot the details out (helps 
the eye fatigue) 

(Need good lead sentence like 
"Thanks, here's your skull back" as 
a sort of joke to sue, ah, lead the' 
fokes in here. I'll have to say 
something now, and it should be 

about the records Ok.... Here 

Monty Python's Flying Circus, 
taped right from the shows, seems 
stilted and removed, yet shines like 
a bit of tortise silver found basking 
on a choral riff. ..good sent., lots of 
illumination, good puns. ..NOW to 
the new one. Strangely enough, 
their new album is the most stilted 
thing they've done since this first 
one. The reason is that no matter 
how much they kazoop around it, 
the boys must still revert to the 
movie soundtrack, which, although 
wackee as expected, still follows 
some, albeit (gd wd) odd Order. 
Achtung! 

OOPS! I've kfecked up, and 
sailed through the deadline, and 
'ere (note eng spllng) I am, in the 
paper. Well, ah, hello, o, lessee 

now (Please printer, ten dots 

there — I need the time—) I shan't 
(nt. Eng.sp.) be much longer. Sorry 
for the messing about, but these 
phony Behind The Skenes Record 
Reviews are a new trick to me 
too.. .and, I, uh...WAIT! COME 
BACK! I HAVEN'T GIVEN THE 
GRADES YET! I KNOW HOW 
MUCH YOU LIKE THE GRADES! 
Ah, hello again. Ok. Almost lost 
you, huh? What? Oh, yes, the 
Grades. Got them right here, and 
(Ed. note. See how inspirational the 
Montys are? All this natting about? 
Great, huhO Even Ed. Notes and 
all.) and here...uh, they.. .are, OH 
yes, right here. Ok, I've got A Bplus 
for the first, and a B for the new 
one. How's that? Now listen, I'm 
the bloody critic (Imp Eng wd) No. 
4) and you just come by here and 
pick up the bl;isTeri thing (Imp Eg 
wd >. b; for upht - ok, you 




Slim Chance 

RONNIE LANE 

(A&M SP 3638) 

time 45:22 



by Mike Kostek 



Slim Chance it is, what with 
Mr. Lane tooling out some sharp 
tunes that are distinctive in their 
finely-crafted difference. An 
amazing glut of taste after the 
shameless Voyeur Cafe musical 
ways of the lazy Faces. B. 



lounge to some notice in jazz-bossa 
nova and thence to limbo. 

Having reappeared, due perhaps 
to co-producer Fahey's influence, 
Bola has chosen to concentrate on 
guitar interpretations of pieces by 
Brazilian composer - Vinicius de 
Moraes, Baden Powell, Dorima 
Caymi - as well as traditional folk 
songs. Music is a very innate and 
compelling part of life in Brazil and 
the guitar is central to the fluid 
sway beat that the music creates. 

Bola Sete is an outstanding 
product of many diverse in- 
ternational influences whose 
unmistakeable present-day style is 
more complexly complete than the 
studied construction of a Ralph 
Towner, the ragtag theme 
development of John Fahey or Leo 
Kottke's unadventurous deftness. 
Sete's performances span great 
vistas of emotions, images and 
musical colors, astounding 
technique always going hand in 
hand with compositional intent. In 
other words, no showing off. 

A few of the 13 cuts that stand 
out and I have room for: the tearful 
joyousness of "Inn of the Begin- 
ning", "0 Astronauta", bassa lilt 
and the dark mood (not to mention 
the title) of "The Lonely Gaucho in 
the Bampas Awaiting the Advent of 
Christmas." "Ocean Waves" is the 
only longer piece, and brilliantly 
suggests the sea's undulations and 
ripples. A most natural album of 
goddam beautiful listening music. 




Bundles 

The Soft Machine 

(Harvest SHSP 4044) 

(Import) 



by Your Sacred Cowboy 



THE BEAU BRUMMELS 
(Warners BS 2843) 
time 31:57 

All very nice, but the Beau's 
problem has always been one of 
scope- they never went far enough 
or deep enough in what they did. 
This reunion album has some 
moments, but never sets sparks. A 
practical demonstration of years of 
u neventful living. C. 




Anniversay Special 

Volume One 
THE EARL SCRUGGS 

REVUE 
(Columbia PC 33416) 
time 35:44 - 
The only thing that bothers me 
about this crackling record is that it 
seems to be a sort of puff job for 
Columbia's Lost Artists Depart- 
ment. What is Billy Joel doing 
playing piano? And who invited 
Alvin Lee? Still, enough real Hot 
Ones are on board Earl's party to 
make things roll nicely. Bplus. 



USA 

King Crimson 

(Atlantic SD 18136) 



by Your Sacred Cowboy 




Ocean 
Bola Sete 
(Takoma) 



by Jack Cahill 



•v - 



"Who s mis strangely-named 
black guitarist recording on our 
label?" the John Fahey addicts 
must be wondering. Let us hope 
they wonder enough to listen, for 
Ocean is a wondrous record, 
opening up new or at least seldom 
heard approaches to solo acoustic 
guitar. Bola Sete ( a nickname 
meaning 8 Ball) is a masterful 
Brazilian musician who has 
travelled a long rough road in mean 
old North America — from cocktail 



Idiots, idiots, idiots! Crimson is 6 
minutes and 32 seconds into "Easy 
Money", right in the middle of a 
great improvisation, and it's just 
faded out. The best cut on the 
album, with the possible exception 
of "Asbury Park", and they just 
fade the freaking thing out. I can't ' 
believe it. That's like exhibiting half 
of a Picasso. I'd gladly have 
sacrificed "Exiles", and even 
"Lament", although that's got 
some goods to it, to hear the rest of 
"Easy Money". That really makes 
me mad. 

Anyway, here's some of K.C.'s 
best and worst, live. The ballads, as 
I said, I could live without, although 
they both have somewhat more 
punch than the studio originals, and 
"Larks' Tongues in Aspic, pt. II", 
and particularly "21st Century 
Schizoid Man" sound like they've 
been done a few hundred times too 
many, but are delivered with ad- 
mirable ferocity. "Asbury Park" is 
the liveliest of the live, particularly 
for Fripp's snakey guitaring and 
Wetton's bomping bass; it too is 
cut short, but not as noticeable. 
"Easy Money" is a little tired at the 
beginning, but the band has some 
fun with it, and when it turns to 
improvisation, a much slower, more 
serene drift than the studio version, 
it is nothing short of beautiful. 

Actually I think the best part of 
the album is hearing the Fripp & 
Eno album over the P.A. before 
they start. I wish somebody would 
get on the ball and release that over 
here. 

King Crimson: a "the King is 
dead, live" \B\ 

Atlantic Records: a "helluva 
tribute, folks" I0-I 



Wait a minute, this can't be the 
Soft Machine; for one thing, I heard 
a melody, for another, the album 
isn't named after a number. I can't 
believe they've finally copped out 
on their competition with Chicago; I 
was expecting it to go on until the 
last member of one band or the 
other had died. But the game is 
over, and the score is Chicage-S, 
Soft Machine- Bundles. 

With this album the Softs either 

begin their recovery from the 

assembly-line jazz-rock that has 

been the bulk of their output since 

the original band-members began 

drifting away after their fourth 

album (4, I believe it was called), or 

else are making one last stab at 

quality before taking the big slide 

into obscurity. At any rate, this is a 

definite improvement over their 

vacuous 7 and most of Six. They're 

still an extremely riff-oriented band, 

which as before tends to make their 

compositions over-simplified, but at 

least there's not quite so much of 

the repeating-riff-with-a-solo-on- 

top, due in large part, no doubt, to 

the fact* that Mike Ratledge 

(keyboards - only surviving 

member of the original band) only 

contributed about five minutes 

worth of the writing. 

The new boy in the band, Allan 
Holdsworth (guitars - first 
guitarist the group has had since 
their first album) is given lots of 
space, which is all right; he brings 
with him a certain element of guts 
which has been badly needed for 
years, and he is neither overbearing 
nor overderivative of other 
guitarists. In fact, nobody's really 
overbearing on this record, and I 
think that's what I like about it; 
they're playing as a group, at least 
occasionally, and not just backing 
up each others' riffing. They still 
need a lot of work on their writing, 
though 

An "on the way up but not up 
yet" l/M 



them all is the addition of Jeff 
Baxter, late of Steely Dan. Baxter 
has unquestionably helped the 
band towards new direct'onr A lot 
of the mr.erial shows sharp Steely 
Dan tendencies, especially the 
piano and guitar sections. "Double 
Dealin' Four Flusher" is a prime 
example. Another strong influence 
on Stampede is the Southern rock 
twin guitar sounds and country 
flavor; "Sweet Maxine" showing 
strong Allman guitar (not to 
mention Steely Dan also) parts. 
"Maxine" is nicely spiced up 
because of it. Without it, we would 
have just another "China Grove". 
Lastly, dominant horn and or- 
chestral arrangements further 
enliven various tracks. The horns 
are a delightful addition, making 
otherwise dull tracks into fuller, 
more rewarding ones. 

Stampede is thus a strong album 
from start to finish. I wouldn't 
hesitate to call it the Doobies' best 
product to date. Getting Jeff Baxter 
was the best move they ever made. 
From the looks of their initial effort 
together, the Doobie Brothers can 
now be counted as one of the good 
rock bands. (B) 




letter 




Dear M. Kostek: 

Just wanted to let you know that 
I was there [Lenox] and saw it the 
same way you did [Springsteen] 
I've seen Bruce about 20 times, I'm 
originally from Philly [Springsteen 
Country] and I've seen the man in 
every conceivable situation — 
Small music clubs, bars, old movie 
theaters, outdoors. The only two 
times I've been really disappointed 
has been the last two times — a 
really mediocre concert with a 
fanatical audience in NYC and in 
Lenox. At Lenox it seemed to me 
that in their sterotypical boogie 
monster reaction the crowd 
brought a performer -artist down to 
their level by demanding too little. 
Maybe they don't know what they 
missed. I did, and you did. Sigh. I 
think you have a certain facility with 
the typewriter keys too. You get 
down and you get tight too. 

David Dye 
A one time Amherst resident 
who lives in the isolated doldrums 
of Maine but who still has friends 
there who send him Springsteen 
reviews. 



Stampede 

The Doobie Brothers 

(Warner Brothers Records) 

time: 40:50 



by David P. Santos 



Somehow, I never could get into 
the Doobie Brothers material. Their 
music was technically fine and fun 
to listen to; mindless AM pop stuff. 
Unfortunately, it all sounded the 
same. Variations on a theme. 
Recently though, the Doobies have 
pulled a couple of surprises; one 
was their most recent single "Black 
Water" and this new album, 
Stampede. Both are a cause for 
hope. 

Stampede shows three new 
influences. The most evident of 



Review 



E 



concerts 



In Concert 

Bonnie Raitt 

Music Inn, Lenox 

August 9, 1975 

Reviewed by Kris Jackson 

Singer-guitarist Bonnie Raitt 
and Steve Goodman en- 
tertained a crowd of some 
eighteen million at the Music 
Inn in Lenox last Saturday, 
Aug. 9. That attendance figure 
may be somewhat inaccurate, 
but the setting can only be 
reminiscent of Woodstock: a 
field full of stoned people, a 
stage, mud, and naked little 
kids. 

And cops. They seem to be 
running the place, taking 
tickets and all. But no 
paranoia, just business. 

The opening act, Steve 
Goodman, was a pleasant 
surprise: varied, intersting 
original material, competently 
presented. But he could only 



be a warm-up for Raitt. 

Her music as always, was 
traditional country blues at the 
roots, original ideas in rock, 
and every shade and hue in 
between. Her guitar work 
ranged from the smoothest 
strumming to the funkiest 
bottleneck, and her ac- 
companiment, consisting of 
bass, backup guitar, piano, and 
drums, seemed solid, though 
bored of the road. The main 
show, though, was Raitt's 
voice: by turns sexy, logical, 
pleading, challenging, or just 
plain musical. 

Sunset came, the music 
ended, and the crowd jammed 
onto the road* again, just like 
Woodstock, until the police 
herded everyone down a 
backroad which flew God- 
knows- where down an un- 
marked, unchartered road 
which finally came out in — 
whew! — Lenox. 



books 




Fear of Flying 
A Penis' Eye View 
Reviewed b" Tom Coffey 

(In writing this I presume a 
large number of people have read 
the book. I imagine many people 
have only considered reading it. No 
matter, after 16 years of school I 
still can't get "book report" and 
"book review" straight.) 

I can't figure this out. Is this 
book's advance reputation a 
product of lecherous pulse-feeling 
ad men or just a horny culture's cry 
for any kind of sex? Bookcover 
announcements by jaded critics 
howl "I had to buy a new box 
spring after reading this delicious 
novel." Once popular authors laud 
"A delightfully horny first novel. 



Class, sass, and ass." Words and 
truncated phrases gleaned from 
long texts like passion pink 
blueberries from a full bush scream 
out "boiling", "exotic erotica", 
"uniquely arousing", "fitfull", 
etcetera. Fear of Flying: sex, lots of 
it, you name it, we got it. No holds 
barred. 

All lies. 

The major thrust of the book is; 
how one particular woman learns to 
stand on her own two feet. It is a 
woman's liberation. Erica Jong's 
frank look at our birthday suits, her 
ease with the words fuck and cunt, 
and her idolization of the "zipless 
fuck" are only part of the overall 
story. 

Before I tread further, let me 
preface my bullshit by saying what I 



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think about the metaphysical 
difference between men and 
women. All things being equal, it is 
only that: a difference. And that 
difference is directly attributable to 
the unique differing natures of the 
clitoral and ejaculatory orgasm. 
Nuff said. 

I can count the number of books 
I've read by female authors on one, 
maybe two, hands. Seeing how my 
reading itinerary usually falls prey to 
popular taste, it is then worth 
noting the sex of the author of this 
novel, for the book may be a female 
forum of unprecendented bestseller 
history. And Erica Jong (as Isadora 
Wing) duly notes that she is tired of 
D.H. Lawrence, Henry James, and 
James Joyce telling the reading 
world how women think from their 
perspective perch in yang-land. 

I may be running out of the basic 
paths, but from what little I've read 
on female liberation — or the 
oppressed versus the oppressor, as 
it may clearly be sometimes — 
most of these books are written in a 
form that may be described as a 
diatribe or a harangue, in some 
cases, or at least didactic or 
pedantic in some manner. Jong's 
Fear of Flying avoids the above, 
makes no pretenses, and is candid 
and bound to truth. It is this quality 
which separates it from it's sisters 
and makes it stand out. 

Enough socio- pol itico 
razamatazz. The book is a plaintive 
personal narrative told to a life long 
friend. It is a soul laid bare. It is 
autobiographical. It is her first 
novel. 

Erica is a wonderful reconteur. 
She has an ability to relate an 
experience powerfully without an 
overdose of uncommon words, 
much like Sylvia Plath. 

Isadora feels that the human 
body is to be touched and com- 
mented upon. She says she is a free 
sexual animal. She envisions the 
zipless fuck (which is like obscene 
sex with no strings attached), then 
the next day she longs to be loved 
and involved in a porcelain-secure 
suburban setting. These ambivalent 
feelings tear her apart. They tear 
her apart even more when she 
actively attempts to follow her 
desires. 

Isadora feels that she is innately 
dependent on a man. That she can 
only fulfill her personalitv and self 
through him. This is one conclusion 

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she reaches: "People don't 
complete us. We complete our- 
selves. If we haven't the power to 

complete ourselves, the search for 
love becomes a search tor serr- 
annihilation; and then we try to 
convince ourselves that self- 
annihilation is love." 

One criticism that finds this book 
easily is: it's elitist. That is true 
when one considers the upper-class 
Manhattenite background and the 
playgrounds of Europe. However, 
the sincerity, the telling-it-like-it-is, 
again is the quality which separates 
the book. That is her background 
and the story is; the impact it has 
had on her. 

The area where the book is elitist 
though, is the addition of French 
and German words to her ab- 
normally large vocabulary (which 
she flaunts at times). She's been to 
those countries; natch, she can 
speak them. Those of us who 
haven't had that opportunity, nor 
the ambition to learn them, should 
at least be edified as to the words 
bent. 

An added aspect to the book is 
that the author lays carefully in 
view her reasons for writing. She 
writes because — though she does 
not label it as such during the book 
- it is a skill, job, lifely enterprise 
that she can delve into creatively 
and with her soul. Eager to achieve, 
eager to learn, it is the job of the 
artist. However, there are definite 
barriers for her where there would 
not be for a man. The barriers are 
both tangible (a woman seeking a 
powerful career) and intangible (her 
independence is somehow linked to 
her ability to write. Indeed, her 
father used to paint over her 
mother's paintings when he ran out 
of canvas, and her mother would 
passively put up with it. 

Jong's sublime intelligence is 
much like Joni Mitchell's. Speaking 
from the heart they lambaste the 
sneaky pretentions and ferret out 
the truthful meanings. Like artist 
Joni, Erica's struggle for freedom is 
umbilically related to her traditional, 
environmental, sometimes 
biological, ties to womanhood 



gnawing at the self. From "The 
Same Situation" on Court and 
Spark by Joni: 
"Still I send up my prayer 
Wondering who was there to 

hear 
I said send me somebody 
Who's strong and somewhat 

sincere 
With the millions of lost and 

lonely, ones 
I called out to be released 
Caught in my struggle for higher 

achievement 
And my search for love 
That don't seem to cease" 
The book leaves you hanging (as 
opposed to erect). Will Isadora 
Wing ever come to grips with this 
soul-shattering ambivalence? Will 
she ever find the zipless fuck? My 
guess is that she'll find her art- 
work, and that the next stop on her 
forthright journey will be a further 
exploration, a deeper indictment, 
somewhere near Mitchell's view in 
"For the Roses", which as space 
won't allow, you'll have to get hold 
of yourself. 



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14 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER COLLEGIA^ 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1*75 



Collegian Comments 




"Official" Nonsense 



by Jim Paulin 



I 



Sultry summer. Any thermometer not 
regulating a refrigeration unit has its mercury 
aspiring to heaven. The digital ther- 
mometers, outside of banks, are lighting up 
all their bulbs to accommodate three digits, 
and everywhere digital thermometers are 
blooming brighter than the bulb in Santa's 
nose around Christmas time. The best ad- 
jective for this summer is "soggy." The 
worst is "crisp." The newspaper under my 
arm is soggy, and it seems like the newsprint 
is starting to run, the pages becoming sheets 
of uniformly gray illiteracy. As I sweat in my 
living room, the T.V. weatherman stares out 
of his air-conditioned studio and reminds me 
that it's "hazy, hot, and humid." 

The "official" temperature is measured at 
the airport, which, as George Carlin says, is 
"ridiculous, since nobody lives at the air- 
port." Airports are always located on the 
"outskirts of Gotham." In Boston, the air- 
port's near the ocean, where the tem- 
perature's always cooler due to the nice sea 
breezes. The National Weather Service, with 
its "Official" temperature, can take its 
"official" thermometer and stick it where if II 
get an official temperature of 98.6. 

The heat will continue through January, as 
people sweat while anticipating increases in 
tuition. 

Paul Parks, honorable Secretary of 
Education probably thinks that the 
university, out here in the hicktown of 
Amherst is still mainly concerned with rows, 
and should be doing something about the 
high price of meat, but since it's not, he 
wants to slaughter us with Dukakis' meat 
cleaver. The first time he came out here, he 
must have shocked at the fact that the roads 
are paved west of 495. I'd think though, that 
he'd like this place, since it looks so much 
like one of the model cities he used to ad- 
minister. Nobody out here, or anybody 
anywhere else that has anything to do with 
this place likes him a whole lot. The trustees 



and administration call his ideas "crazy** and" 
"nonsensical". At the trustees meeting, the 
student trustee promised to call for Mr. 
Parks' resignation. Former Great Society 
heavy and now UMass President Wood 
asked "that's the only resignation you're 
calling for?" Like anyone else at a long 
meeting, the trustees sit around picking their 
noses and grinding their hands into their 
chins. 

Earlier that officious Wednesday, in the 
State House, the university was before the 
House ways and rv. »ans committee haggling 
over its yearly allowance with the 
representatives "who have to answer to the 
taxpayer." The reps sit along a long bar, 
talking into microphones plugged into a 
central sound system, and the only way you 
can tell who's talking is by looking at lips. 
The Worcester medical school feared that its 
new teaching hospital was going to be the 
victim of infancticide and that its brilliant 
staff it had just recruited would defect if it 
didn't get enough money. 

While the chancellor form Boston campus 
was describing his campus' library and all the 
books it still needed to acquire, in ac- 
cordance with the demands of official 
academic accreditation, one of the 
representatives "who has to answer to the 
taxpayers" interrupted and asked if the 
Department of Youth Services was using the 
campus to detain delinquent children. He 
must have been joking, even if the place ' es 
resemble a fortress. The chancellor gag , ad 
and sputtered what sounded like a "<1uh." 
Someone sitting beside the cha- cellor 
whimically interpreted the question to nean 
were any students being detained , | the 
library. The question would have be< l more 
appropriate for Chancellor Br ™rv since all 
that would need to be don > cor vert this 
campus' library into a dete i cer.^r would 
be to change the locks on the ooio of the 
study rooms. 



Signing Off 



The summer is winding to a close, and this the staff. First, thanks to reporters: Richard 
i issue of the Summer Collegian is the last. Wright, Cliff Skibinsky, Walter Mitus, John 

What has happened this summer will McHale, Judith Wolinsky-Soloway, Bill Mills, 
affect us all in the fall, and beyond. Susan Genser, Aaron Huber, Berta Kundert, 

It's been one long waiting game ... waiting Sue Adley, Mike Fay, Bonnie Ruth Allen, 
for the budget to be cut, waiting for some Hillary Martick, B.J. Roche, Joe Mahoney, 
concrete results in the alleged Campus Mike Kneeland, Tom Coffey, Paul Logue, 
Center mismanagement scandal, waiting for Rebecca Greenberg. Thanks a lot to Tyla L 
student organizers to organize themselves, Michelove, Mike Kostek, Andy McKenzie, 
waiting... waiting for Godot, or so it would and David Sokol, who provided us all along 
seem at times. And we're still waiting, with music and record reviews, concert 
Undoubtedly some changes are in order for reviews, and centerfold musical listings, 
the fall, and the outlook is bleak, at best. As The following people made the weekly 
students, we must prepare ourselves to exert Collegian Comments page possible through 
our rights since the pressures put upon the their efforts, and we thank them: E. Patrick 
University have had a tendency to come to McQuaid, Rob Melacasa, Zamir Nestelbaum, 
rest upon the heads (and pocketbooks) of Robert Golner, Brian Harvey, and Jim Paulin. 
the students, in the past. Extra special thanks go to the three artists 

It's important that the Summer whose talents were both infinite and in- 
Collegian existed, even if we were unable at valuable to us: Mike Moyle, Stuart Cudlitz, 
times to give a complete picture of the and Kris Jackson (this issue marks Kris 
situation at UMass. Students are the reason Jackson's retirement from the Collegian). 
UMass exists, despite the apparent belief of Photographers who helped were George 
many administrators to the contrary. Withers, Tuna Stewart, Ed McCarthy, and Ed 
Students can all too easily be stepped upon Cohen. Thank you all. 
quietly during the summer, when fewer are In addition, we would like to extend our 
around to watch. sincere gratitude to the Summer Activities 

Therefore, it's essential that students have Staff who gave us their continued 
a summer newspaper to give them at least a cooperation and assistance all summer, 
partial idea of the situation at UMass. Budget Special mention goes to Fred Nobles, who 
cuts are readied, offices are closed, the always managed to get all of each week's 
administration makes moves that students Dublicitv material to us by deadlines, 
would know nothing about without a We would also like to take this time to 
newspaper. We were * ist a weekly paper extend a very special thanks to our 
w'*h a fabiy smaii staff. We didn't always publishers at Ware River News, most 
>e soace we wwd^d Unooubtedly especially Lorna, Cynthia, Debbie, Betty, and 
v.w.e are i' ingt that \:ti% ! J '; out fif the 
pa->*r uW i 'lOuio nave bee, included. 

Yet, in spite of our limitations, we have 
tried to give at least some ide i of the events 
that concern the future of the University as a 
whole and of ourselves as students over the 
summer. We hope that we have succeeded. 
Many tharjii are in order for the people 
^•Ifcg Jkunmer Collegian possible, 



of course Pa* whose dedication and ex- 
pertise has made the summer not only 
poa* >w, but indeed enjoyable. 

Arid last, but not least, we'd like to thank 
the UMass administration for a never ending 
source of material. 
...That's all, folks. 

Debbie . ha*er, Dan LaBonte 
Surr><t -r Collegian Editors